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Author Topic: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 1650 times)

Robert

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: May 28, 2022, 08:04:37 PM »


Brodiaea terrestris ssp. terrestris is also a late blooming species.



A few days ago the first flower buds of Calochortus superbus started to open.



The fully open flowers are amazingly intricate and beautiful.



In the shaded part of the garden the first of the Lilium pardalinum hybrids are starting to open.



The white flowers of Heteromeles arbutifolia have a strong pollen scent. This plant grows near the path to the compost pile (a must for our garden!). The scent of the Toyon (Heteromeles) reminds me of the local chaparral habitats where this species is native.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2022, 08:09:29 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: May 28, 2022, 08:06:36 PM »


Rhododendron cumberlandense is one of the late blooming Azalea species that thrive in our garden.



The tall stems of Aquilegia formosa are filled with flowers in our shaded garden. The fragrant flowers of Nicotiana sylvetris are now open too. The tall stems of Digitalis purpurea are loaded with seedpods. Hopefully they will seed about our garden without help on my part. I always sow seed of this species just in case they fail to seed in the garden. Their flower show each spring is something I do not want to miss.

Now our garden is transitioning into its summer phase. Planting and harvesting agricultural crops now occupies much of my time and is very pleasant. For me, the natural rhythm of the agricultural seasons is being restored. The barley harvest has been completed and I have almost finished the rye harvest. Natural wild yeast sour dough cakes and salt free pickled vegetables are finally returning to my diet. With the hot summer-like weather I can contemplate ornamentals for our summer – early autumn garden. Planning autumn agricultural crops has already started.

[The temperatures have vacillated all week:  We had a couple of nearly 40°C days, followed by a precipitous drop down to around 20°C.  This trend seems likely to continue.  It remains dry in our area, with clouds from storms to the far north passing through.

Nik, 

Thank you for the times you have submitted in the past.  The tranquility of your garden and nearby has brought me wonderful reminders to slow down, breathe, and persevere through a challenging time.  I have learned to appreciate mosses more, having your exquisite photos bringing their details to my attention.  Computer stuff remains a challenge for me, and for Robert, so we understand your decision to bow out.  Just want you to know our gratitude for what you have submitted.

Akke,

Your photos are incredible.  Just loved the Allium, the willow by the water, and the ant (under wildlife).  One day I saw a bee just poking up out of an iris in the early morning, as if poking out from under the covers and deciding it was too early to get up.  I was not quick enough to get back out to photograph it, but I did think of you.  Many of the birds have begun molting, a good sign.  Hopefully Naomi can take the hint, and we will be done with nests and eggs—the first rest since mid-February.  Tovi, on the other hand, is having a terrible time:  He is normally my sweetest, but lately has been aggressive.  Today he went after me, and bit my arm hard (better than my face).  I still have yet to figure out what upset him.  That is what I get for loving creatures that really are not domesticated.  More material for my bird care guide!  Never a dull moment!]
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

ian mcdonald

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2022, 08:29:16 PM »
Robert, I envy your cool temperatures, here it is around 15oC and raining. The same is forecast for all of next week. More like a poor March.

MarcR

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: May 29, 2022, 03:24:10 AM »
Robert,

Lovely garden!  You seem to be about 3-4 weeks ahead of us, in The Salem area of Oregon.

It must be nice to have things maturing early.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2022, 03:26:52 AM by MarcR »
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F  -9.4C.  Rainfall 50"+  but none  June-+September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight.  soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus.  Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix.

Mike Ireland

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: May 29, 2022, 11:14:15 AM »
A selection from the garden.
Aquilegia canadensis
Campanula betulifolia
Clematis hirsutissima
Clematis fusca dwarf form, from seed sent to me by Lesley Cox

Robert, would really like to be able to grow Calochortus in the garden, even in the alpine house I find them near impossible.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2022, 05:36:29 PM by Mike Ireland »
Mike
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

Maggi Young

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: May 29, 2022, 02:07:27 PM »
Another from Anton Edwards : " Weeds or Wonders? Here are four to think about: hellebores in seed, Brunnera leaves, blue Corydalis flowers and yellow welsh poppies (Meconopsis cambrica) They all are beautiful, and normal weeds don’t stand a chance against them. But they all take over the world if not controlled …  "

Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Maggi Young

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: May 29, 2022, 02:15:21 PM »
Also from the garden of Anton and Margaret  - some paeonia shots from Anton ....


P. lutea ludlowii


P. rockii type


P. rockii type
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Mariette

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: May 29, 2022, 03:50:20 PM »
Diplacus pictus is a very tiny plant for me. If I may save seed, I´ll sow it earlier than March when it arrived with me this year.



Peloric foxgloves were growing in the garden when we bought the house 38 years ago. A pseudo-pelorie with proliferation turned up a few years ago, this year´s find shows additional petals as well.



This plant was bought as Lathyrus gmelinii, but looks different from plants shown growing wild. Any ideas? In the background are the orange flowers of Lathyrus aureus, a smaller and daintier plant in all parts with me.



Vincetoxicum hirundinaria ssp intermedia showing yellow flowers.

« Last Edit: May 29, 2022, 03:59:27 PM by Mariette »

Claire Cockcroft

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: May 29, 2022, 05:59:45 PM »
There is a lot of color in the garden, despite the seesaw weather of rain/cold/hot.

Maianthemum racemosum (Smilacina racemosa)
705768-0

Iris innominata (or a close hybrid)
705770-1

Dianthus and genista
705772-2
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

Claire Cockcroft

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: May 29, 2022, 06:03:11 PM »
While I grow many rare and/or difficult plants, I also appreciate the common, easy ones.

Dianthus
705774-0

Aethionema
705776-1

Amsonia, just coming into bloom
705778-2
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

ruweiss

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: May 29, 2022, 09:19:34 PM »
Dear friends, thanks for showing all the fine plants in your gardens.
Attached are some photos from the last time:
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

ruweiss

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Re: May 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2022, 09:25:14 PM »
More plants:
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

 


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