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Author Topic: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 3243 times)

Robert

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: February 14, 2022, 02:12:25 AM »


The fallen flower petals of Prunus ‘Okame’. I admit that I enjoy the carpet of flower petals on the ground, as much as I like the flowers on the tree. In addition, to view the petals as they fall and flutter to the ground is especially peaceful.

Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Leucogenes

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: February 14, 2022, 11:14:56 AM »
Hello Robert

As you know, I read every word from Jasmin and you with utmost interest and great enthusiasm. Unfortunately, I often lack the necessary time to comment on every report from you.

Diplacus douglasii really forces me to express my joy. Wow...what an enchanting tiny beauty...totally unknown to me until now I am particularly interested in the native creatures of your California home...you know.

Also, the recent Lewisia rediviva specimen you showed caused my heart to race. The magnificence during bloom will be overwhelming...I am sure.

Best regards and health to you both....

Cheers

Robert

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2022, 05:58:34 PM »
Hello Thomas,

Horticulture and working with plants is such a fascinating journey.

I work with the plants that are available to me and close at hand. Orchestrating the plants into a pleasing garden tapestry is such an exhilarating, creative process. And then, each plant species is a world in itself to explore.

The Genus Diplacus and Erythranthe are very fascinating. I have been working a great deal with our local species, of which there are many.

Lewisia rediviva is generally found on serpentine in our part of California. It is easy to cultivate, however it is also very demanding as to its cultural requirements. I grow a few plants in specially prepared sites in our garden where they grow well. Both Diplacus and Erythranthe are easily amenable to our garden. Now I grow hundreds each year, both my own hybrids as well as specific genetic lines of the species. I am very enthusiastic about our local Diplacus and Erythranthe species.

We can get so much valuable information from this Forum as well as Ian Young’s Bulb Log. I enjoy Ian’s comments on some of our California native species that he and Maggi grow in their garden. For example, his comments concerning Veratrum fimbriatum are very fascinating to me. I will never grow this species, however I do want to grow our local Veratrum californicum var. californicum. His comments are full of tidbits of information that provide clues as to how to grow this (and related) species and use it effectively in the garden. He does this with a myriad of plant species. I have such gratitude for this resource and his continuing efforts.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Akke

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2022, 06:41:42 PM »
Robert

I’m joining Leucogenes in his enthousism for Diplacus douglasii, absolutely charming. I’ve been looking forward to them (in a vicarious way?), had a sneak preview when you mentioned them earlier.  Your attention for overlooked local plants is inspiring, Eucrypta is very attractive without being showy. It’s also reassuring that enjoying fallen flower petals is done more often.

It’s very pleasant to share in all the completely different scenes, Nik, your snowy rock outcrops look great. Though winter is not forecasted now, it might still visit.

Jasmin

Your beautiful description of the sunset made me think of rain immidiately, I hope you got some.

Here Scilla libanotica fliowered.


I’ll spare you the pictures of the destruction in the park done by city employees, normally they’re very careful, I’ve send a notice. I put in a request to be careful with ( almost 100% certain) Gagea Lutea too, more than a 100m2 doesn’t get a chance because of mowing early.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Leucogenes

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: February 15, 2022, 11:06:26 AM »
You put it very well, Robert...working with plants is a journey.... partly to distant worlds.

I have sown many species again this season...including a great many North Americans. These are becoming more and more my favorites. The two absolute highlights will probably be Sphaeralcea caespitosa and Astragalus loanus.🤞

Membership in the Eriogonum Society is one of my next steps.😉

Thank you so much for always expanding my botanical horizons with your reports....

Robert

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: February 15, 2022, 03:24:13 PM »
Thomas,

I hope that some day you are in a position to share the results of all the seed sowing you have done over the years. Although I grow very different North American plant species under very different circumstances, I am still keenly interested in what you are doing with plants. Understanding what species grow well for you and even what species did not work out would be very fascinating and enlightening to me.

I hope that you can post some photographs of your results in the future.


Akke,

I enjoy and appreciate all that you are sharing with us on the Forum. I am extremely interested in how your container garden will evolve over time. It appears that you have a completely different pallet of plants species to choose from compared to my situation in California. For example, you are exposed to a different range of Viola species than the ones I work with here in California. I am very interested in how these Violas species work for you.

Yesterday here in Sacramento, the first F2 seedlings of Viola purpurea ssp. purpurea started to germinate and show cotyledon leaves. I was crossing my fingers and hoping they would germinate and grow, and now they have appeared! For me such a simple thing is very promising and exciting. I have a set of Viola glabella seedlings that are surviving into their second growing season. I will be repotting a portion into a different soil mix that I believe will be more to their liking. And then there are our other local native Viola species that are in various stages of development. It is spring and so much is coming along quickly now.

Thank you again for sharing so much. The close up photograph of Scilla libanotica was enchanting!

I will post more as I can. Right now I am starting an irrigation repair job up at the Placerville property so will be very busy at times.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2022, 06:36:03 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Akke

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2022, 07:14:42 PM »
Robert

Thanks for sharing so much information and pictures, seems there’s a lot of reading and enjoying to catch up in the diary section. Meanwhile, pleasure and being inspired is going on, I’m not trying to achieve the ‘perfect’ container, just learning and having fun. Seeds are germinating and I’m equally excited about the ‘local’ species as I’m about the ‘exotic’ ones.
Concerning species we grow, it might be more fascinating that we actually grow a few that are the same, given the very different circumstances. Muscari azureum, or pseudo, is just starting to show flower buds, I’m afraid I drowned some previousely, they seem fine at the moment.
Talking about water/rain, next week a lot is expected here, are you’re going to get any? Maybe our general/my private situation isn’t too bad, groundwaterlevel has been low for a few years now, we used to think about getting water out, now there’s plans to keep it in.
Good luck with repairs.

Jasmin, thanks for all your wise and helpful words. I’ll keep them in mind and at heart.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Robert

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2022, 06:30:19 PM »
Akke,

Unfortunately, we received no rain from the most recent storm that passed through our region. There was a light dusting of snow at the crest of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, however this was hardly measurable. The persistent dry weather is very troubling.  [Jasmin adds:  Your lovely thoughts did bring the most beautiful sunrises and sunsets due to the sheer number of clouds of varying shades of grey.  I hoped some very dark clouds would come, to have that as background for the Okami cherry, but they did not get that black-grey color I hoped for.  I too am pondering our shared thoughts.  Now two of our cockatiel hens have laid eggs—actually one had three and the other one—and these are restless and demanding until they have their clutches and brood in earnest.  If any wonder where I disappear to, it is bird slavedom.]



The dry storm front was followed by strong, cold, dry winds. Generic hybrid Crocus opened their flowers in the sunshine.

You are so fortunate to have such a wide variety of plants available to you. Caravans and porters rarely come to Sacramento, California. This is why I garden the way I do, attempting to turn the most mundane and common plants into something interesting and exciting (at least for me). When I read the Crocus, Narcissus, and Galanthus threads on the Forum, I feel a sense of admiration for the plants. The efforts and creativity of many people has created a world of plants and gardening that is very inspiring. The plants may be unobtainable here in Sacramento; however the Forum threads fuel my desire to be resourceful, to see if I can transform our local common plants into something new, interesting, and exciting.  [Jasmin: I prefer the optimism of gardening to the news.  I really like the color of Mr. Mylemans Eranthis hyemalis “Schwefelglanz”, and yes, I felt so bad about his Galanthus elwesii “Kite”, whether the damage is slugs, or virus, perhaps even the bark he used, or frost.   So maybe I am not such a Galanthus brute!  I just do not want too many taking over the yard.]



I am finally getting our garden beds covered with shredded autumn leaves. Better late than never. Most of the Galanthus have finished blooming and the Erythroniums are just getting started. Erythronium multiscapideum is our local native species and they grow well in our garden. Other common native species such Iris hartwegii ssp. hartwegii and Iris macrosiphon grow well in these beds along with our local Sisyrinchium species: S. bellum, S. elmeri, and S. idahoense var. occidentale. In the far bed are many Camassia leichtinii ssp. suksdorfii. This species is common and sold by the thousands; however I have a large local gene pool to draw upon to breed and expand upon what already exists. This makes gardening fun and interesting.



Our Star Magnolia, Magnolia stellata, is starting to open its flowers.



In our dry garden, Arctostaphylos densiflora ‘Howard McMinn’ is in full bloom. Our native Manzanita species are a major food source for our native hummingbirds and a myriad of native insect species.  Nearby, Arctostaphylos ‘Sunset’ is also in bloom. The coppery new growth of this variety is very attractive.



Moraea macronyx seems happy in our dry cider block planters. This species blooms consistently each year and is such a pleasure to see in bloom.

Soon our dry garden will bloom with many local native Themidaceae, native Allium species and a host of native annuals.

Now, off for a few days to repair the irrigation!
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Akke

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: February 17, 2022, 10:38:49 PM »
Robert

The scenes you share are so pretty, the contrast of different seasons has become so much more attractive lately, before, flowers and foliage growing would have got my full attention instead of the whole picture. The beautiful snowy pictures shown here have added a great deal to this at well.
Is your generic hybrid Ruby giant? The purple stands out to the other colours anyway.

Sometimes a picture isn’t even necessary, Jasmin, your description of the Okami cherry triggered my imagination. I didn’t google the Okami, just made a picture in my head to fit your description, stlll I hope you can make this picture.  The weather here is not very pleasant, strong winds and more to come, I might even move some containers into shelter.

You seem to have much more challenges in your climate, I just like the way you’re working with them, showing so many beautiful plants in your garden and wild ones. Sometimes it feels that we had to do with what was available as well. Where I grew up, geographically from your point of view inside ‘de Keukenhof’,(it is located to be more accurate about 5  to 10 miles to the west because the soil was leaner and better draining, that was real tulip territory) dutch Tulips were favourite generally. Where I live now, just over a hundred miles to the northeast, Stinzenplanten found their origin. Yup, I’m fortunate, there’s so much to enjoy within a (short) walk with the dog. There is and will be a lot of species to share with neighbours and other people, it’s charming. Getting bulbs or seeds, there’s  possibilties here, I’m worried about the seed exchange though, at the moment I’ve started practising hand-pollination as I acquired some lovable species as bulbs. Seedlings I’ve sown are increasing every day, we(neighbour is a big mental part of this) will see what local species are sown additionely, some indigenous Veronica seems very likely.

Trying hand-pollination.

A bit messy.
Sold by thousands, with a possibilty to observe by tens/hundreds of thousands, often overlooked.

Temperature is good, this Tulipa bud is in hurry

Hope the wind doesn’t destroy it.

Scilla Mischtschenkoana is late despite above average temperatures.

Just love ‘the little blue bulbs’

To my standards, a difficult one.

Crocus cyprius flowering for the first time, hopefully many more times to come.
(Up to a point,this one really would have liked your dry winter,Robert )

Jasmin

Take care of your cockatial hens, I wouldn’t be surprised if they are good company, my chicken was. Her offspring were better friends with my father as he ran the vegetable garden.


Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Mike Ireland

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: February 18, 2022, 03:53:05 PM »
Two daphne in flower at the moment, hope they still are after the "howler" we are having today.
Daphne bholua Jaqueline Postill & Daphne mezereum seedling.
Mike
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

Mike Ireland

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: February 18, 2022, 03:56:14 PM »
Cyclamen coum, a lovely dark flower.  Unfortunately not in my garden,  at a friends in south Lincolnshire.
Mike
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

Akke

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: February 18, 2022, 08:59:38 PM »
Mike

Your Daphne look beautiful and peaceful, I hope the storm didn’t damage it. At the moment we’re probably getting the worst, better to see tomorrow when day comes. Wish everyone the best.
Akke & Spot
Mostly bulbs. Gardening in containers and enjoying public green.
Northern part of The Netherlands, a bit above sealevel, zone 8a normally, average precipitation 875 mm.
Lots to discover.

Mike Ireland

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #42 on: February 19, 2022, 11:46:02 AM »
Akke the daphne & the rest of the garden look fine this morning.  Amazing what the plants can stand up to.
Surprised the greenhouses have survived without a little damage.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2022, 11:48:31 AM by Mike Ireland »
Mike
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

Mike Ireland

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #43 on: February 19, 2022, 12:03:11 PM »
Crocus tommasinianus the day before the big storm, not opened today as it is very dark & overcast.
Mike
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

Robert

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Re: February 2022 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #44 on: February 19, 2022, 06:51:26 PM »
Mike

Jasmin:  Your Daphnes are lovely.  Daphne mezereum is particularly sweet.  Thank you for sharing your friends’ Cyclamen coum also.  Cyclamen are one of my favorites:  the flowers, foliage, and the seed capsules always delight me!  Your most recent photo of the crocuses was superbly beautiful!

Akke

Jasmin:  Your pictures are always so lovely!  Sounds like we are all suffering strong winds these days.  It continues to be extremely dry, with no rain in the forecast.  I will absolutely have to water!  I think your imagination is better than the picture I scribbled of what I hoped for:  A background of slate grey-blue, dark Prussian blue, and black; the Okami cherry lit from the setting western sun, which highlights the bark and pink flowers with a peach glow.



With the heat everything is opening in an explosion of flowers:  buds are just about everywhere.  The risk now is there is a prediction of a deep frost that could kill.  We shall see.  As for the birds, they are far ahead of their past March-April pattern.  All our birds are rescues or rehomed from previous homes.  The four cockatiels are all hand-fed, human-bonded birds, very unlike our budgies and canaries that were all aviary parent-reared.  However, it does lead to very humorous situations.  So far the canaries are tamer than the budgies.  They all know my proper place is to serve!

[Robert]

Akke,

The Genus Crocus certainly works for us in our garden. Yes, the previous picture posted was of Crocus ‘Ruby Giant’. When I bought the bulbs many years ago they were labeled as mixed Crocus: Yellow, Lavender, and White. Many years later I purchased Crocus ‘Ruby Giant’. These match the other Crocus, so I am assuming they are the same.

Crocus cyprius is a great recommendation for our garden! I did an Internet search for Crocus cyprius to see if they were available in California or even the U.S.A. I did not find a source. This is a VERY common dilemma I run into when looking for specific plants for our garden. So, like so many other plant species, Crocus cyprius goes on my “if by some miracle I come across this plant” list.

I have a great deal of success growing Crocus from seed. 60% of the Crocus species in our garden were grown from seed. On the other hand, I cannot get any of our Crocus to set seed, despite hand pollination. Maybe I will get seed this year. Next year I will grow some Crocus in pots so I can better control the environmental conditions. Maybe with this method I will have success.

I recently read an article about “China Lilies” in California. Narcissus tazetta ssp. chinensis was brought to California during the California Gold Rush of the 1800’s. They can still be found growing around old building sites dating to the 1800’s. Maybe the China Lilies at these old sites qualify as Stinzenplanten? The old timers I talked with back in the 1970’s used the term “China Lily” to include Narcissus tazetta ssp. chinensis as well as some other old Narcissus that were found at these old sites from the 1800’s as well as the very early 1900’s. It is all very interesting.



Diplacus pictus is now coming into bloom. I originally bought the seed from Seedhunt, a small California-based mail order seed company. If one is interested in growing California native annuals, they are one seed company to check out. They do have a web site.



Pseudotrillium rivale is native to Northwest California. Our hot, dry Sacramento, California garden is very different from their native environment. I have a few plants that are doing very well in our garden. They also set seed! I am very pleased. [Jasmin:  He is “pleased”!  I should think the words “completely excited” are more accurate!  The garden really is transforming into the visions we have held and conversed about for so long.]



About 20 years ago I grew a random batch of seed gathered from numerous named Pulmonaria varieties growing in the Placerville garden. The Placerville garden is completely gone now; however some of the offspring of these named varieties are growing on in our Sacramento garden. They do extremely well in our garden.



This is another plant derived from that original batch of seed.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

 


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