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Author Topic: Primula 2018  (Read 19529 times)

Philip Walker

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #30 on: April 05, 2018, 11:49:01 PM »
P. 'Stradbrook Dainty'
P.'Allen Queen'
P.'Joan Hughes'

Yann

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2018, 09:30:13 PM »
I never have heard of Primula megasaefolia, do you sown it Gerd?
Lots of nice primulas in this post.
North of France

Gerdk

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2018, 07:39:38 AM »
I never have heard of Primula megasaefolia, do you sown it Gerd?
Lots of nice primulas in this post.

I received a piece of this plant from a friend a long time ago. It does well but only when  kept inside during spells of frosty weather -seeds are built occassionally.

Gerd
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 06:46:49 PM by Gerdk »
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

johnralphcarpenter

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2018, 01:41:54 PM »
This unknown primula has established itself under some shrubs here. Similar to Primula vulgaris but bigger and darker. Any guesses?

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Ralph Carpenter near Ashford, Kent, UK. USDA Zone 8 (9 in a good year)

David Nicholson

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2018, 08:34:09 PM »
I think you'll have to settle for a form of Primula vulgaris Ralph. Do you get P. elatior (Oxlip) in your area, if you do this might have some blood in it? All i all they are promiscuous little things.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Steve Garvie

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2018, 09:53:08 PM »
Primula renifolia -a compact Caucasian Primrose relative.
WILDLIFE PHOTOSTREAM: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rainbirder/


Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Philip Walker

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #36 on: April 24, 2018, 10:48:03 AM »
Primula henrici
Primula 'Mauve Mist'
Primula x pubscens seedling
Primula x 'Kusum Krishna'   (edit to correct name)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 12:29:11 PM by Maggi Young »

Steve Garvie

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #37 on: May 01, 2018, 11:06:42 PM »
Primula henrici
WILDLIFE PHOTOSTREAM: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rainbirder/


Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Claire Cockcroft

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #38 on: May 11, 2018, 05:33:29 PM »
It's the start of a parade of candelabra primulas.  Primula japonica is always the first (and seeds prolifically).  Primula cockburniana has vanished, but its genes live on in a hybrid.
...Claire
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

Sally

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #39 on: May 12, 2018, 05:25:19 AM »
Claire, is that P. japonica a named one? Do you grow one of about that color called 'Glowing Embers'?

Sally
In Idaho

Claire Cockcroft

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #40 on: May 12, 2018, 05:44:52 PM »
None of my P. japonica plants are named ones.  They started years ago from various seed exchanges and have mixed themselves quite readily.  I do wish I could get 'Postford's White' back, but so far, seed exchange seeds have let me down.
...Claire
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

David Nicholson

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #41 on: May 24, 2018, 07:19:36 PM »
Do I assume that Dodecatheon is still in Primula?

I've grown the following from seed but I wonder if the names are correct? If anyone can help please it would be much appreciated.

Dodecatheon pulchellum


flower close up of above
617231-1

Dodecatheon frigidum


David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Sally

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #42 on: May 26, 2018, 06:33:41 AM »
David, your Dodecatheon pulchellum is certainly more robust than the ones growing wild here.  I'm not sure, but ours may be D. pulchellum pulchellum.  The species native to this ranch stays short, doesn't have such large leaves, and usually a maximum of 4 or 5 flowers per stem.  But the rainfall is only an average of 14" per year.

Sally
South of Lewiston, Idaho

Claire Cockcroft

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #43 on: May 27, 2018, 12:07:05 AM »
Primula forrestii, grown from 2009-2010 SRGC seed exchange.  Originally, I thought I had a single plant in the pot, but this year, with 3 flowering stems, I discovered that two are pins and one is a thrum.  Hopefully there will be seeds, thanks to hand pollination.
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Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

David Nicholson

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Re: Primula 2018
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2018, 07:46:20 PM »
David, your Dodecatheon pulchellum is certainly more robust than the ones growing wild here.  I'm not sure, but ours may be D. pulchellum pulchellum.  The species native to this ranch stays short, doesn't have such large leaves, and usually a maximum of 4 or 5 flowers per stem.  But the rainfall is only an average of 14" per year.

Sally
South of Lewiston, Idaho

Thanks for responding Sally. After further research I'm now thinking that the plant I had labelled as Dodecatheon frigidum is more likely to be D. meadia. The D. pulchellum is quite sturdy and I wonder if the seed was perhaps from the form 'Red Wings'?
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

 


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