We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise  (Read 4869 times)

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #45 on: November 19, 2023, 06:36:15 PM »
During the La Niña event of last year we experienced much below average temperatures during the winter and early spring with very low snow levels in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. These events are closely associated with La Niña in our part of California. The much above average precipitation last winter, however, is generally not associated with La Niña.

Climate change has impacted our region to the point where we are in uncharted territory. El Niño was once associated with much above average precipitation and temperatures during the winter months in our part of California. Starting about 25 years ago, the association between El Niño events and seasonal weather patterns began to decouple.

Currently there is a very strong El Niño event occurring in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. So far temperatures have turned much above average, typical of an El Niño event in our region. However, precipitation totals have been running about average, with long periods between precipitation events. Precipitation is much more difficult to forecast than temperature, especially months into the future. Right now there is no clear indication which direction our winter precipitation season will turn. Drought seems to be the new normal for us, so I am not very optimistic about another abundant precipitation season this winter in our region.

Looking to create a garden resilient to our evolving conditions is a passion.  Right now, autumn color finally began, but the much welcome rain has quickly blown much of the leaves away.  So, we look with anticipation toward spring, and some plants that we are working with to create this acclimated vision.



This is a photograph of Rhododendron occidentale ‘Early Cream Pink’. This is one of 5 selections I made from an ecotype of the species found in the Pulga Bridge region over 20 years ago. All 5 selections are extremely heat tolerant. 115 F (46.1 C) temperatures are common in this region most summers, and these plants thrive in our Sacramento garden despite the extreme heat we have experienced the last few years. In addition, each selection blooms about 45 days before the type species in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The Sierra Nevada race of Rhododendron occidentale is very different from the race found in coastal areas of California. For hot, dry climates these selections are vastly superior to the coastal California varieties of this species.



This is one of our Rhododendron occidentale hybrids derived from our Pulga Bridge selections. It too is extremely heat tolerant and thrives in our Sacramento garden. Progress does not stop here. Crossing these with extreme dwarf forms brings the possibilities of small 0.3 x 0.3 meter plants that are extremely heat tolerant, and have fragrant and colorful flowers. Maybe my Summer of Love series of deciduous azaleas will someday be realized. How exciting!



Developing resilient new plant varieties for hot, dry climates is very exciting. This high elevation form of Erythronium multiscapideum thrives in our Sacramento garden. The petals of this selection are flushed pink. In addition, the genes of the “Cliftonii” ecotype of this species are present throughout the genome of this species throughout its range. The depth of genetic variability presents additional breeding possibilities.



There is tremendous genetic variability in Calochortus venustus.



Breeding forms of Calochortus that are easier to cultivate is another project that is slowly progressing. This pink form of Calochortus venustus from the Sierra Nevada Mountains is quite attractive.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #46 on: November 19, 2023, 06:38:35 PM »


Calochortus splendens is another species found in brutally hot and dry parts of California.



For those that enjoy growing tiny alpine species, these high elevation forms of Calochortus minimus are worth the effort to cultivate.



If one observes closely, the genetic variability in Calochortus minimus becomes very apparent. These low elevation forms of Calochortus minimus experience extremes of heat and drought not experienced by the alpine forms of this species. In this photograph a pure white and flushed pink form of this species can be seen. This is only a fraction of the variability found in this species.

In a rapidly changing climate there are many opportunities to find and develop new resilient plant varieties for hot dry climates.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 467
  • Country: us
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #47 on: November 20, 2023, 02:49:49 AM »
Robert,

Over the past 60 days daytime temperatures have ranged between 52 and 71 degrees F [11-21 C].
Night temheratures have ranged from 44- 56 F [7-13 C].
We actually have more different taxa in bloom now than we did in summer.
I have been trying to inventory what is in bloom and just in the early part of the alphabet, i have in bloom:

i/o = indoor/outdoor  /a= annual
* In winter wraped in a polyethylene cylinder with hair dryer and thermostat set to 35 degrees F

Abutilon hybridum
Abelmoschus moschatus
Abutilon megapotamicum
Abutilon pictum
Abutilon ‘Thompsonii’
Achimines antirrhina i/o
Achimines erecta i/o
Achimines grandiflora i/o
Achimines hybrids i/o
Achimineslongiflora i/o
Aconitum carmichaelii
Aconitum helmsianum
Agastache barberi
Agastache foeniculum
Allium callimischon
Allium stellatum
Althaea cannabina
Anemone huphensis
Anemone vitifolia
Anisodontea scabrosa
Antirrhinum hispanicum
Arum pictum
Asclepias incarinata
Bomarea caldesii i/o
Brugmansia sanguinea i/o
Calluna vulgaris
Caltha dionaefolia
Camelia brevistlea
Camelia fluviatiles
Camelia japonica
Camelia oleifera
Camelia sanguinea
Camelia x vernalis
Campylotropis macrocarpa
Caryopteris x calydonensis
Caryopteris  incana
Ceanothus ‘Marie Simon’
Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
Cestrum ‘Orange Peel’ i/o
Chelone lyonii
Chelone  obliqua
Clerodendrum bungei
Clerodendrum ugandense i/o
Clethra barbinervis
Clitorea ternata  /a
Cobaea scandens /a
Colchicum autumnale
Colchicum baytopiorum
Colchicum bivonae
Colchicum byzantium
Colchicum ‘Lilac Wonder’
Colchicum speciosum
Colchicum variegatum
Commelina coelestis
Correa ‘Dusky Bells’ i/o
Crocus banaticus
Crocus goulimyi
Crocus hadriaticus
Crocus kotschyanus
Crocus laevigatus
Crocus longiflorus
Crocus medius
Crocus nudiflorus
Crocus ochroleucus
Crocus oreocreticus
Crocus pallasii
Crocus pulchellus
Crocus sativus
Crocus serotinus
Crocus speciosus
Crossandra nilotica i/o
Crowea exalata  i/o
Cuphea ignea /a reseeding
Cuphea macropetala /a   reseeding
Cyclamen africanum
Cyclamen cilicium
Cyclamen cyprium
Cyclamen graecum
Cyclamen hederifolium
Cyclamen mirabile
Cyclamen rholfsianum
Daboecia cantabrica
Daboecia scotia
Diascia barberae
Diascia cordata
Dichorisandra reginae i/o
Distictis buccinatoria *
Dracocephalum forrestii
Eccremocarpus scaber
Erica abietinia
Erica alopecurus
Erica calycina
Erica carnea
Erica cetinthoides
Erica coccinea
Erica x darleyensis
Erica discolor
Erica glandulosa
Erica pilulifera
Erica pixidiflora
Erica sparsa
Erica tetralix
Erica triflors
Erica vagens
Erica versicolor
Erica x watsonii
Escallonia bifida
Escallonia x exoniensis
Eucryphia cordifolia
Eucryphia x nymansensis
Fremontodendrom californicum






« Last Edit: November 20, 2023, 03:00:47 AM by MarcR »
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #48 on: November 20, 2023, 08:09:20 PM »
Hi Marc,

Is it unusual for so many plant species to be blooming in your garden in mid-November?

Here temperatures have been running above average for the month of November, although there is not much blooming in our garden at this time. In past years we have had some species bloom well out-of-season, during the autumn or winter. Temperature is clearly one variable; yet other factors are involved. Variations in solar radiation (cloud cover) can initiate out of season blooming. Epigenetics may also be involved, however there is still much to learn about how and why epigenetic processes take place. Epigenetics is clearly a survival/adaptation mechanism for most life forms.

In some cases epigenetics is involved with changes that take place in the vernalization process of various plant species. It may also be involved with the changes that take place with seed dormancy. For example, seeds that will germinate readily when sown fresh (i.e. go through their normal vernalization to germination process), but enter a more complex dormancy if sowing is delayed.

Learning and discovery is never ending, but this makes life and gardening enjoyable and interesting.

Below are a few of our native Delphinium species that we are working with in our garden. Most are difficult to work with in our low elevation, hot, dry, Sacramento garden. Steady progress is being made to find and create forms that are much easier to cultivate in our garden. They are such graceful, beautiful plants.  [Jasmin]:  These have shown the most promise, given our conditions.  Decades ago, we could dabble with more traditional garden Delphiniums, but just as with Meconopsis, eventually climate and climate change won out.



This is a high elevation perennial species that grows quite large.



Delphinium gracilentum is a mid-elevation, perennial species. There are many color forms of this species. A favorite in our garden.



This is Delphinium hesperium ssp. pallescens as seen in Colusa County, California. We have never cultivated this species in our Sacramento garden, however it would be worth trying. It is also a good reason to return to this region, as there are so many fine plant species in this area.



Delphinium nuttallianum generally blooms with deep lavender-blue flowers. In my fieldwork I occasionally encounter white and lavender-pink forms of this species. Delphinium nuttallianum is a perennial, high elevation species. I have found mid-elevation forms of this species that likely have genetic qualities that might allow this species to be cultivated in our Sacramento garden with more ease.



Delphinium patens ssp. patens is a low elevation, perennial species. We have had great success cultivating this species in our Sacramento garden for many years. Second generation plants are being grown and tested throughout our garden. At one time this species grew abundantly on our Placerville property. Due to very poor land use practices, this species is now rarely seen on our property. Steps are being taken to restore much of our property to something that might resemble its original condition 300 years ago before the introduction of gold mining, invasive species and livestock grazing.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #49 on: December 15, 2023, 07:42:36 PM »


Winter in our part of Northern California is an active time for many plant species, especially many California native species. Pictured is a batch of Phacelia campanularia seedlings started in October. They are now large enough to plant out in the garden and will make a beautiful display, if all goes right, when they bloom in the spring.



Over the past few months I have been transferring my handwritten botanical field notes to one of my computers. There are over 30 years of field notes, so this process will take time. Fortunately, what I have accomplished so far has proven very helpful in my development of superior varieties for our Sacramento garden. With the computer I am able to sort my field note data according to species, location, elevation, microclimate, soils types, ecotype characteristics, and more. This data can also be linked to my climatic data for our part of Northern California.

In the photograph above, I am selecting seedlings for further evaluation based on seedling phenotype characteristics and known marker genes for specific characteristics. Quick access to the data in my field notes has simplified and enhanced this process greatly. This certainly can reduce the number of seedlings that need to be grown on to maturity.



This batch of Narcissus romieuxii type seedlings started blooming on 5 December. This is 4 weeks before the average first bloom date for this type of Narcissus in our garden. During other seasons flowers have appeared as early as 16 December. We have no history on this batch of seedlings other than they were derived from open pollenated garden plants. Without a history for these seedlings there is no way to know whether this early blooming characteristic is a function of the weather this season or a genetic characteristic that will persist to a certain degree from season to season. I like to keep notes, so this batch of seedlings will begin to have a history and unique characteristics can be notes.



This photograph was taken of the same batch of Narcissus romieuxii type seedlings on 13 December. All of our older batches of Narcissus romieuxii type seedlings have flower buds emerging from the soil and seem on track to bloom at their usual time, approximately 1 January.

Our goal is to breed resilient plants well adapted to our Sacramento garden. Establishing a truly sustainable closed garden ecosystem, like one finds in nature, is also a very important goal. The creative process to craft garden plants that are useful, functional, beautiful and unique to our garden is a very pleasant pursuit.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2023, 07:46:30 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #50 on: December 29, 2023, 05:53:01 PM »


As we approach the New Year I would like to share some photographs from our Placerville garden taken during the spring and autumn of 2007.



Our Placerville garden was lush and full of many beautiful trees, shrubs and perennial species.



We liked to use color and texture of foliage effectively in this garden.



We had many grafted named varieties of Japanese Maples.



Autumn leaf colors were spectacular.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #51 on: December 29, 2023, 05:55:10 PM »


This is the same garden today.



“A picture is worth a thousand words”.

This is why we are so emphatic about sustainability and building resiliency into our garden and the plants we grow in our garden. Our Placerville garden is an example of how climate change and other changing conditions can ravage a garden if one does not consider sustainability and resiliency into the long-term garden plan and design.

We feel sad that all these plants died; however without this lesson we would not be creating an exciting new garden in Sacramento. I am currently engaged in my most creative and exciting gardening projects. Jasmin and I hope to share our new and evolving garden though this gardening diary.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 467
  • Country: us
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #52 on: December 30, 2023, 08:33:08 AM »
Robert,

It is sad that so many trees died.  You might consider replacing them with things like various Catalpa species and Paulownia elongata.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #53 on: December 30, 2023, 05:24:15 PM »
Hello Marc,

A plan for the site where our Placerville ornamental garden was once located was devised quite a few years ago. Our primary objective is habitat restoration. The goal is to recreate a stable habitat/ecosystem that resembles what might have existed 300 or 400 years ago in an Upper Sonoran, Blue Oak Savannah ecosystem in this area.

Most of this project does not pertain to ornamental horticulture, however some aspects are being applied as part of my R & D projects here in our Sacramento garden. For example, the process of rapid adaptive evolution is being applied to create resilient ornamental varieties specifically adapted to our region and the climatic changes taking place. The concept of rapid adaptive evolution is nothing new. In a broad sense, one could say that the selection/evolution of teosinte to maize is an example of this process.

In our Sacramento garden we are making excellent progress applying rapid adapted evolution in our R & D projects. For example, in three short years we have developed genetic lines of Ranunculus occidentalis that are tolerant of summertime irrigation, highly resistant to garden pests and diseases, and are strongly perennial. The original introductions of this species in our garden were quickly destroyed by garden pests and had no tolerance of summertime irrigation. Developing strongly perennial plants occurred quickly in the selection process. Currently we are in the process of incorporating additional breeding lines to create what we envision as outstanding and resilient garden plants for our region.

We have many other species in the development stages. For example, excellent progress is being made with our native Delphinium species, Lupinus polyphyllus, as well as many of our native bulbous species such as Erythronium, Allium, Brodiaea, as well as other Themidaceae. Identification of useful genotypes in the field is being facilitated greatly by the organization of my botanical field notes on one of my computers in a way that specific populations can be identified and trialed for useful genetic characteristics.

So out of what could have been viewed as an unrecoverable disaster, has come the most creative and fulfilling horticultural undertaking I have done to date. It is incredibly exciting and every day brings something new, fascinating, and fulfilling.

[Jasmin]:  Yes, although we loved the garden-that-was immensely, we are so excited and enthusiastic to create something new.  This is the opportunity gifted us.  Gardens are creative endeavors.  Change is constant, no matter what we grow:  There are seasons, weather, microclimates, plant successes and plant “failures”.  It is up to us how we choose to view or perceive the situation.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 467
  • Country: us
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #54 on: January 06, 2024, 12:23:30 AM »
Robert & Jasmin,

You are fortunate to have 2 beautiful properties to work with. I think that [within limits] almost anything you do with either of them will look nice, because the beauty of the  property will make it so. Your current plan of selectively breeding natives to adapt to climate changes  is certainly a wise approach. Once you have established your native Garden; you might consider adding an eclectic selection of exotics that you enjoy and that do not clash with your natives.  Though, if you want to grow exclusively natives that will have its own beauty.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #55 on: January 06, 2024, 02:54:00 AM »
Hello Marc,

Yes, my work with local California native species is progressing well. I am working with a select partnership, here in the U.S.A., to expand the range of plants I grow in our Sacramento garden. There are other Mediterranean type plants I am working with. Any new acquisition needs to meet strict, specific requirements before it is included into my development work. I find this work is extremely fulfilling, highly creative, and filled with the most fascinating experiences and results throughout the seasons.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #56 on: February 03, 2024, 06:32:57 PM »
Here in California the winter has been very mild. December was the warmest December ever recorded. We also experienced above average temperatures in January, 2.76 F (1.53 C) above the 30-year average. It was 76 F (24.4 C) on 29 January! This tied the record high temperature for the month of January set back in 1984. We also had some cold weather in January, however we are still on track to record the warmest December through March time period. The lack of chilling hours is likely to have a strong impact on agricultural crops as well as ornamental species.  [Jasmin]:  As an aside, the personal impact of such a warm winter has actually been the proliferation of mildew in the house on the north side during damp days (foggy or high humidity, but not exactly rainy).  Even with airing the house (since it is not frigid), the stuff grows much too quickly.

The lack of cold weather has also manifested itself in high snow levels and below average snow accumulation. Currently snow liquid equivalents are about 75% of average to date above 6,000 feet (1,829 meters). Below 6,000 feet the situation is much worse, 25% or even less. Currently, precipitation amounts are running about 85% of average to date, however a large snow pack is very important hydrological aspect of both the ecology of the Sierra Nevada Mountains as well as a reservoir of water for agriculture and municipalities throughout California. We have two more months in our precipitation season and are hoping for the best.

Here in our garden I am doing the best I can to create and maintain genetically diverse seed lines of at least a few ornamental species. Margaret Thorne alerted us to the alarming number of Meconopsis species either lost to cultivation or threatened to be lost soon. The situation here in California is similar or even worse for many ornamental species. So many ornamental seeds traded about are either unintended hybrids or highly inbred and lack the genetic diversity to survive the dramatic climatic shifts taking place around the globe. Too many species are introduced from the wild and then are quickly lost to cultivation. Continuing reliance on wild seed stocks is not a viable strategy in the long term, given climate changes. I am doing the best I can to do what I can to remedy this situation; however I am just one person and can only do so much. At least, efforts are being made to remedy the situation with the Genus Meconopsis.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2024, 06:38:00 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #57 on: February 04, 2024, 08:09:50 PM »


I enjoy creating true-breeding, genetically diverse seed lines to share with gardening friends. It is always nice to receive true-to-name or true-to-description seeds to grow in the garden.

Above is an example of seed saving going wrong. A number of years ago, I received seeds labeled as Crocus tommasinianus. When the resulting plants bloomed, it was clear that they were not Crocus tommasinianus, but hybrids, likely with Crocus vernus. In addition, the plants turned out to be completely sterile, and are likely aneuploids. Unless I get a spontaneous doubling of the chromosomes and some sort of fertility is restored, this line is useless. Most of the Crocuses in our garden are of a similar makeup. Fortunately, I finally have one fertile seed line. How inbred this line is, is unknown to me at this time, however the F2 generation of plants are coming along.



I received seed of Narcissus cantabricus that have developed into nice plants and are completely fertile. They appear to be true-to-type. Sadly, most of the “species” Narcissus seeds I receive are unintentional hybrids. For breeding purposes they are generally fertile and do give me a mix of genes to work with, however they are useless as true-breeding species as they were originally labeled.

Despite the challenges and obstacles I am making slow progress with some groups of plants that interest me. Progress with our local native plant species is relatively rapid since I do not have these same challenges and obstacles, yet these breeding projects still require a great deal of effort on my part. Thankfully I enjoy the process, which is a pleasure and rewarding.



I want our seed lines to become tough, enduring plants. All of our plants are grown and tested outside in the garden. I want them to thrive despite the weather, pests, and diseases. Also, when possible, I want them to thrive under a range of soil conditions, and require little or no supplemental fertilizers. In other words, I want to create plants that will preform well in our garden or a friend’s garden without a lot of pampering.



Here is an example of how I can make rapid progress with “local” native plant species. Pictured are some of this year’s intra- and inter-specific Erythronium hybrids. Erythronium hendersonii, E. multiscapodium, E. oregonum, E. taylorii and E. tuolumnense are represented in the mix. An issue we need to deal with in our Sacramento garden is a lack of chilling hours (vernalization), which influences the growth and blooming of many Western Erythronium species in undesirable ways. We grow hundreds of seedlings and select the most adapted plants to keep in our garden. Rapid adaptive evolution is possible if large numbers of genetically diverse plants are grown.



I have not worked much with the genus Cyclamen, however I appreciate this chance Cyclamen coum seedling immensely. I hope to save seed from this selection and see if I can develop a true-breeding seed line.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #58 on: February 04, 2024, 08:12:40 PM »


Delphinium patens ssp. patens is another local native species that I am working with. The next generation of plants is coming along nicely. Many years ago this species grew abundantly on our Placerville property. They were so beautiful! I want to recreate this effect in our Sacramento garden. In addition, a strong adaptable seed line will be useful when it is time to reestablish this species on our Placerville property.



Our native Pipevine, Aristolochia californica, is coming into bloom in our Sacramento garden. We have planted many, hoping to attract Pipevine Swallowtail Butterflies (Battus philenor) to our garden. Blooming Manzanita species are also part of the equation: In the winter the adult butterflies feed on the nectar provided by our native Manzanita species while they mate and lay eggs on the Pipevine plants.

Last year I planted seeds of our native Asclepias cordifolia, Purple Milkweed. Most of the plants have grown well. Despite the fact that the plants were small, we were still able to attract one Western Monarch Butterfly to our garden. The Western Monarchs are near extinction. I hope to plant some of our other local native Asclepias species in our Sacramento garden. Perhaps we can create a small haven for the Monarchs before it is too late to keep the species going.



Salvia gesneriiflora blooms all winter and is a great source of nectar for our native hummingbirds.



The bright red flowers of Salvia gesneriiflorum are very showy.



Salvia semiatrata is another late autumn – winter blooming species. The native hummingbirds enjoy the nectar of this species too.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4820
  • Country: us
  • All text and photos © Robert Barnard
Re: Robert's and Jasmin's Garden Paradise
« Reply #59 on: February 04, 2024, 08:13:45 PM »


I enjoy both the flowers and the texture of the foliage of Salvia semiatrata.

[Jasmin]:  Right now it is 13ºC.  Today is very dark with scattered rain, and increasingly intense wind with strong gusts.  It hardly seems possible now that it was so warm and sunny just a couple days ago, when Robert took these pictures.
     The Aristolochia plants in the front garden are just breaking dormancy, and it is too early yet to know if they will bloom.  Slowly we continue to add groupings of native plants to create mini-ecosystem communities to invite the return of our native birds and butterflies. 
     This is a more hopeful long-term restoration than the more common effort—one I had done in the past:  In my previous efforts to encourage our native species, I did not have sufficient populations that could sustain themselves through the numerous conditions they encountered in the garden.  Further—as often happens—nectar/food-source plants were in the garden; yet because they were entirely non-native plant species, they did not provide the year-round food/nectar, the hiding places and habitat, to actually nurture the young to adulthood, whether nestling or caterpillar.  It was a lovely garden, and it was enjoyed, but it really did not fulfill this other important goal I had.  This time, we have a much more integrated garden, one we hope will be more enticing and sustaining of our native fauna.  We shall see.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal