Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

Bulbs => Ian Young's Bulb Log - Feedback Forum => Topic started by: Ian Y on January 03, 2018, 11:35:16 AM

Title: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 03, 2018, 11:35:16 AM
I wish everyone a happy healthy New Year with many garden pleasures and successes.

The first Bulb Log of 2018 is heralded in by a profusion of hoop petticoat Narcissus flowers.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan031514978967BULB_LOG_0118.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan031514978967BULB_LOG_0118.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Linda on January 03, 2018, 03:41:26 PM
Already read and admired! What a nice way to be greeted in the still new year! Thank you!!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: annew on January 03, 2018, 07:21:33 PM
Craigton Chalice is a lovely thing, and very distinct. It's so hard to choose between so many gorgeous hoops just now. Nice to see you have the same problem!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 03, 2018, 08:05:43 PM
Already read and admired! What a nice way to be greeted in the still new year! Thank you!!

Thanks Linda, hopefully you will enjoy them for the rest of the year.

Craigton Chalice is a lovely thing, and very distinct. It's so hard to choose between so many gorgeous hoops just now. Nice to see you have the same problem!

It is a nice problem to have Anne, so many are lovely but not distinctive enough - they have to stand out from the crowd before I even consider naming them.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 10, 2018, 11:23:55 AM
Winter thoughts and tasks in this Bulb Log

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan101515583223BULB_LOG_0218.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan101515583223BULB_LOG_0218.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on January 10, 2018, 07:30:23 PM
I like the winter views of your garden, and all the evergreen plants in it. Ferns look so big and nice.  :)
I have been thinking recently about how different the climate can be also in my garden: in some parts the frost melted away during the warm period around New Year, but in another part of the garden the ground stayed frozen! Just the same as you had over there. :)
Though now the ground is frozen everywhere, but again some parts are better for early spring plants than others later when the spring comes.

I remember you have written earlier (maybe in the summer, I can't now find it) that Primulas don't like it when you can't dig the ground. Do I remember correctly and are they more difficult to grow when there are more tree roots, and the compost is added only above the ground? Which Primulas do like your garden?
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 11, 2018, 04:11:11 PM
Leena,
Yes it is my experience that Primulas do best in fresh dug ground,, they will grow if you have a good amount of humus above tree roots that is refreshed every year.
The Primulas that have stayed with us are Primula florindae and other candelabra types, also P. vulgaris,  veris, etc. Oh Primula marginata.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on January 12, 2018, 11:03:27 AM
Thank you.  :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 17, 2018, 11:36:03 AM
Narcissus 'Craigton Chorister' on the cover of this Bulb Log - which finds the bulbs and the photographer having to adjust to deal with the low winter light.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan171516188852BULB_LOG_0318.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan171516188852BULB_LOG_0318.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: YT on January 17, 2018, 03:17:24 PM
Hello Ian,
Iím happy you mentioned my 'Craigton Chorister' picture posted in the forum, thank you :)
The mid-day light levels at your place are far lower than I guess. That is almost twilight! I have to thank to living in the low latitudes with higher light levels.
Flash unit on compact digital cameras Ė even if they are high-end models like yours Ė usually donít work well with flowers.
Using the neutral colour LED torch with your camera under the weak sunlight is a very good solution. And perhaps a tabletop tripod like this http://amzn.asia/9E5H2V0 (http://amzn.asia/9E5H2V0) could help you.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 17, 2018, 07:06:29 PM

On a cloudy day at this time of year it is always twilight- yesterday and today we had blue sky and sunshine all be it very low in the sky.
I have a small tripod but it is difficult to place it near my subject without it or the camera causing damage to others.
The problem is my own making as it was me who planted so many bulbs:-))
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: annew on January 21, 2018, 06:25:30 PM
Thank you both. It has me looking at little tripods for taking my flower portrait shots indoors. Gloomy here too. 8)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 24, 2018, 11:44:02 AM
See how the freezing conditions affect the Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan241516794058BULB_LOG_0418.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan241516794058BULB_LOG_0418.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Diane Whitehead on January 25, 2018, 06:27:49 PM
I am surprised that your Eranthis seeds manage to survive on the surface and germinate.
I have birds that practically plough the ground, with both feet moving backwards so they
can eat any seeds below the surface litter.

Perhaps your birds have daintier eating habits.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Harald-Alex. on January 25, 2018, 07:52:53 PM
See how the freezing conditions affect the Bulb Log.

(Attachment Link)
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan241516794058BULB_LOG_0418.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan241516794058BULB_LOG_0418.pdf)
Hallo Ian Young, I have read Your interesting blog with the frost-conditions-pictures. We have here this very often in winter, but this year it is very warm, only some nights with -2įC. I am every time so surprised, to see, how dowdlayed snowdrops after frosts stands up with much of energy!
Thank You for so many blogs, I am memeber of the SRGC since november 2017 and read with great interest the bolgs of the former years! Greetings from germany Harald Alex
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 25, 2018, 08:54:33 PM
I am surprised that your Eranthis seeds manage to survive on the surface and germinate.
I have birds that practically plough the ground, with both feet moving backwards so they
can eat any seeds below the surface litter.

Perhaps your birds have daintier eating habits.

Diane, we have lots of birds foraging for seeds,also mice, but they never seem to touch the Eranthis seeds.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 25, 2018, 09:00:18 PM
Hallo Ian Young, I have read Your interesting blog with the frost-conditions-pictures. We have here this very often in winter, but this year it is very warm, only some nights with -2įC. I am every time so surprised, to see, how dowdlayed snowdrops after frosts stands up with much of energy!
Thank You for so many blogs, I am memeber of the SRGC since november 2017 and read with great interest the bolgs of the former years! Greetings from germany Harald Alex

Thank you Harald Alex, it is always interesting to compare growing conditions in other gardens and countries as we all seek to achieve the same goal of good growth.
I am sure you will enjoy being a member of the SRGC and among other things your joining helps support these pages.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 31, 2018, 11:33:21 AM
Snowdrops start to flower in the garden while Narcissus are under glass in this Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan311517398203BULB_LOG_0518.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jan311517398203BULB_LOG_0518.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: John85 on January 31, 2018, 05:46:59 PM
About the sandbeds in the greenhouse :
Ian you say that 15 cm is a minimum.1m would be quite expensive.What would be a good compromise,knowing that the sand would not be on a kind of table but on the top of a raised bed of "normal" soil.
Would a layer of gravel between both be advisable?
Your sand seems quite gritty.Is that the best?What would be ideal?
What kind of manure do you use (a lot of K I guess but not only) and how much?
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on January 31, 2018, 06:43:32 PM
About the sandbeds in the greenhouse :
Ian you say that 15 cm is a minimum.1m would be quite expensive.What would be a good compromise,knowing that the sand would not be on a kind of table but on the top of a raised bed of "normal" soil.
Would a layer of gravel between both be advisable?
Your sand seems quite gritty.Is that the best?What would be ideal?
What kind of manure do you use (a lot of K I guess but not only) and how much?

John

I would say 30cms of sand sitting on the soil would be good, no gravel between the layers.
Yes it is a gritty sand that is best, it is better draining and holds air as well.
Yes plenty K after flowering, I scatter alight dressing of NPK 7-7-7 in Autumn before the first watering then when I water in the winter using cans I add a quarter to half strength liquid tomatoe fertiliser.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 07, 2018, 11:37:49 AM
The wave of Snowdrops and Narcissus flowers rolls on in this week's Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb071518003380BULB_LOG_0618.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb071518003380BULB_LOG_0618.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Diane Whitehead on February 12, 2018, 06:13:08 AM
Lovely upward view of the snowdrops, Ian.

Do you dig yourself a hole to crouch in, set the camera on the ground
and hope it focusses itself, or pick the flowers and put the vase up high
so you can be comfortable?
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 12, 2018, 10:15:35 AM
Diane
I set the camera on the ground switched to manual controls including focus , my procedure is explained  in the Bulb Log beside the Cyclamen picture.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Diane Whitehead on February 12, 2018, 06:08:52 PM
OK.  So you're not lying flat on the ground - just the camera is, and
you take lots of photos to get one that is good.  Isn't it wonderful
to be able to do that now instead of being parsimonious with film.

It would be interesting to see you doing it on YouTube. 
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 12, 2018, 06:58:18 PM
OK.  So you're not lying flat on the ground - just the camera is, and
you take lots of photos to get one that is good.  Isn't it wonderful
to be able to do that now instead of being parsimonious with film.

It would be interesting to see you doing it on YouTube.


I am kneeling down and pretty low to the ground, I get the exposure and focus pretty quickly it is the framing that takes a few shots although I am learning all the time.
Yes when I was taught photography I was told to remember that every time you pushed the shutter button it cost you money- al that is changed now.
Mmm a YouTube that's a thought but I would need extra hands, or a tripod!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on February 12, 2018, 07:52:04 PM
I'm game to try to help!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Rick R. on February 13, 2018, 01:00:58 AM
My camera has a tilting view screen, so I can hold the camera on the ground pointing upward and still see how the photo will look.  A fully articulating view screen would work even better.  Of course, the camera's manual mode allows the most control for how one wants his picture to look, but may I offer a simpler method for simpler people (like me):

Any camera with a manual mode will also have an adjustment called "exposure compensation".  Here you can instruct your camera to let in more (or less) light by varying amounts, than it normally would.  It is usually used in automatic or semi-automatic modes.   In the case of Galanthus with the camera pointing up at the sky, you take a normal pic and the Galanthus flower itself turns out too dark.  Adjust your exposure compensation to +1, +1.7 or +2 to let in more light.  (Try them all, it doesn't cost anything!)  The detail of the flower can then be seen. 

This is an excellent easy trick with lots of applications.  When snow blankets the ground, the camera auto mode will often show the snow with a gray tint, and dark objects will have little detail and just look black.  Fix this with exposure compensation and let in more light.  My winter snow landscape pics are always taken with at least a +1 EV (exposure value).

Another example, same pic with different exposure compensations:
[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

 Some cameras have Exposure compensation bracketing. This will automatically take a series of photos at differing exposure values (EV) each time you snap one picture.  Even less fuss!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 14, 2018, 11:23:39 AM
Rick, thanks for sharing that information, I also use the exposure compensation a lot when on automatic settings, especially when photographing white flowers.

By learning and being familiar with your camera settings/ functions and experimenting with them will result in more creative and better photographs.

A fully tilting screen would be an advantage in these situations.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 14, 2018, 11:24:34 AM
Flowers continue to appear, despite the changing weather, but will they open - find out in the Bulb Log.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb141518606975BULB_LOG_0718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb141518606975BULB_LOG_0718.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on February 15, 2018, 07:04:51 PM
Nice to see your Leucojum in flower Ian. Last April I bought small pots of L. vernum and L. v. carpathicum from Beth Chatto's nursery which I later planted in the garden, both are just showing noses. A couple of weeks ago I bought a 2 Ltr pot of L. vernum from a local Garden Centre (a surprising purchase opportunity?) and these have also been planted in the garden and are showing about 2" noses.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on February 15, 2018, 07:43:57 PM
It can sometimes be a real shock to find certain plants on offer  for sale in a garden centre- or even a supermarket!  Case of being  in the right place at the right time, David!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 15, 2018, 08:03:39 PM
Nice to see your Leucojum in flower Ian. Last April I bought small pots of L. vernum and L. v. carpathicum from Beth Chatto's nursery which I later planted in the garden, both are just showing noses. A couple of weeks ago I bought a 2 Ltr pot of L. vernum from a local Garden Centre (a surprising purchase opportunity?) and these have also been planted in the garden and are showing about 2" noses.

I love Leucojums David we only have a few early flowers just now but in a few weeks we should have lots of them in flower.
You are wise to buy them when ever you get the chance.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 21, 2018, 11:33:35 AM
There is no time like the present in Bulb Log 0818


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb211519212603BULB_LOG_0818.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb211519212603BULB_LOG_0818.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: sokol on February 21, 2018, 12:16:05 PM
Thanks Ian, to remember me to bring my Eranthis pinnatifida to a protected place. We will have frost below -10įC next week.
The trick with the glass is sometimes better than bringing the pot to a warmer place, especially when the plants have rooted out of the pot.

I did not know that it is so easy to split a Haberlea clumb. I will do this too, later in the year.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 21, 2018, 02:39:29 PM
Thanks Ian, to remember me to bring my Eranthis pinnatifida to a protected place. We will have frost below -10įC next week.
The trick with the glass is sometimes better than bringing the pot to a warmer place, especially when the plants have rooted out of the pot.

I did not know that it is so easy to split a Haberlea clumb. I will do this too, later in the year.

Yes because so often the roots grow out pot into the sand plunge so I do not like moving them around, it does make photographing them difficult sometimes but always the plants come first.

Hope nothing suffers in the frosts we are also forecast to have a colder period.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on February 28, 2018, 12:04:50 PM
Lots of flowers to enjoy and jobs to do in this Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb281519819248BULB_LOG_0918.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb281519819248BULB_LOG_0918.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Yann on February 28, 2018, 10:17:23 PM
lots of nice photos under the sunny scottish sky (not anymore  ;))
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 01, 2018, 10:09:25 AM
lots of nice photos under the sunny scottish sky (not anymore  ;))

Yann, the sun is shining briefly between the snow showers but all the Galanthus have collapsed to the ground to survive the bitter cold made worse by the strong easterly winds.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Yann on March 01, 2018, 10:59:59 PM
indeed the strong cold wind gonna affect several plants in the garden, i also fear for the 1-2 years old bulbils in the frozen compost.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 07, 2018, 11:20:23 AM
A cold snowy start to spring in the Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar071520421452BULB_LOG_1018.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar071520421452BULB_LOG_1018.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on March 08, 2018, 10:01:45 AM
I love the structure big rhododendrons give to your garden. Most of the ones you grow are not hardy enough to grow here or they don't grow so big, but there is R.brachycarpum var tigerstedtii and cultivars with it as a parent which can become large also here, and with your garden in mind I have been growing them (from seed) so that someday there would be big rhodos also in my garden.  :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on March 08, 2018, 03:50:00 PM
Leena,  Rhododendron smirnowii reaches a good size and is VERY hardy.  I also have a R. taliense x lacteum which is  hardy in a cold spot.  Also, my pet R. bureauvii can take a lot  of cold - it  rolls its leaves and feels cold  but  survives.  I hope you can source some of these to add to your garden.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on March 10, 2018, 11:00:17 AM
Maggi, thank you. :) Of course, R.smirnowii is hardy also here! I forgot about it. I don't have the pure species growing, but I have some seedlings with it as a parent (though the other parents are smaller rhododendrons). R.bureavii is not hardy enough to grow here, even in the warmest part of Finland in the south west archipelago it is not doing so well, but some say that R.bureavioides is more hardy, and I have two seedlings of it growing. I love Taliense section rhododendrons with indumentum, and I have a small R.adenogynum which I hope will grow to be a beautiful plant. I have also small two year old plants of R.taliense, they grow really slowly. My biggest plant with nice leaves is ten years old R.balfourianum var aganniphoides and it's been completly hardy so far. I have great hopes for it. :)
Growing rhododendrons from seed is quite slow process, but I have learned a lot about them in the meantime.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 14, 2018, 11:45:22 AM
The yellow river rises as the white wave flows across the garden while Crocus bring strong colour.
Click on the Bulb Log link.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar141521023978BULB_LOG_1118.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar141521023978BULB_LOG_1118.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: fermi de Sousa on March 14, 2018, 12:42:22 PM
Rivers of gold and silver flowing in Aberdeen!
Well done, Ian!
Your cobblestone bed looks like it is working at keeping the bulbs safe from varmints
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 14, 2018, 02:23:55 PM
Rivers of gold and silver flowing in Aberdeen!
Well done, Ian!
Your cobblestone bed looks like it is working at keeping the bulbs safe from varmints
cheers
fermi

So far so good Fermi it is certainly deterring them from digging and eating the corms. I also see from clusters of small leaves that after the mice chewed away the new corm leaving the old corm below new growths must have formed on the old corm.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 21, 2018, 11:25:11 AM
Winter refuses to release the  Bulb Log but in the shelter of the bulb house I can enjoy the Narcissus flowers.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar211521629526BULB_LOG_1218.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar211521629526BULB_LOG_1218.pdf)

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: pehe on March 21, 2018, 08:26:47 PM
Ian, thank you for making the Weekly bulb log. It is a real pleasure reading them!
The blue striped "Crocus biflorus" in bulb log 11 looks very similar to Crocus abantensis Azkabans Escapee from Janis Ruksans.

Poul
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Carolyn on March 21, 2018, 09:32:33 PM
My thanks too, Ian. I have just managed to germinate Tropaeolum azureum for the first time. I was not sure what to do with it next, so read all your bulblog entries and made some notes. It stands a better chance of surviving now. The seed came from the seedex and was sown in January at 20C, germinating after about 6 or 7 weeks. So far, 2 out of 6 seeds have germinated, which, after reading the bulblog, seems to be quite a good result. I was surprised to read that you leave the seeds outside in the cold. I would have expected this to be a warm germinator. Like you, I have often (well, always) had nothing germinate at all. it would be interesting to hear how other people have got on with these seeds.
Thanks again for all your useful experience.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: John85 on March 22, 2018, 09:03:45 AM
Thanks to Ian we don't even have to go outside to the mailbox to have up to date garden news.
The mice here must be better diggers as cobbles don't deter them to dig and eat the corms.
Therefore I plant them in 'boxes' made of 6mm mesh.But the stems are often cut by the wind at the level of the wire mainly for small bulbs that can not be planted too deep.
Does anyone have a better idea?
Ian,your galanthus trough is a bit damaged.Was that done by the frost?
How long do they last usually before needing some repair.(min temp. -8įC)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 23, 2018, 01:04:37 PM
Ian, thank you for making the Weekly bulb log. It is a real pleasure reading them!
The blue striped "Crocus biflorus" in bulb log 11 looks very similar to Crocus abantensis Azkabans Escapee from Janis Ruksans.

Poul

Good spot Poul, there are similarities and I had not considered that as a possibility - I will check the corms when they go dormant.
thanks Ian
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 23, 2018, 01:09:46 PM
My thanks too, Ian. I have just managed to germinate Tropaeolum azureum for the first time. I was not sure what to do with it next, so read all your bulblog entries and made some notes. It stands a better chance of surviving now. The seed came from the seedex and was sown in January at 20C, germinating after about 6 or 7 weeks. So far, 2 out of 6 seeds have germinated, which, after reading the bulblog, seems to be quite a good result. I was surprised to read that you leave the seeds outside in the cold. I would have expected this to be a warm germinator. Like you, I have often (well, always) had nothing germinate at all. it would be interesting to hear how other people have got on with these seeds.
Thanks again for all your useful experience.

Well done on germinating Tropaeolum azureum.
Over the years we have had a lot of problems getting seed to germinate now I just scatter it in the sand beds where it seeds around happily over twenty seedlings are growing in the latest sand bed I converted last summer.

Best advice for young seedlings is feed every time you water and keep them growing for a long as possible which may mean keeping them cool in summer! If they get too hot or dry they will immediately go dormant.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 23, 2018, 01:15:47 PM
Thanks to Ian we don't even have to go outside to the mailbox to have up to date garden news.
The mice here must be better diggers as cobbles don't deter them to dig and eat the corms.
Therefore I plant them in 'boxes' made of 6mm mesh.But the stems are often cut by the wind at the level of the wire mainly for small bulbs that can not be planted too deep.
Does anyone have a better idea?
Ian,your galanthus trough is a bit damaged.Was that done by the frost?
How long do they last usually before needing some repair.(min temp. -8įC)

John I might have been foolhardy saying that the cobbles have been successful but for over a year now we have not lost any corms plus I like the look of of the bulbs growing through the cobbles.

That trough must be 20 years old now and the degradation of the top edge is a combination of weather and birds - I generally retouch the paint on the top edge about every five years . I have had a new trough prepared for two years now but just never got around to doing the job of emptying it in the summer - this year I hope.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Carolyn on March 23, 2018, 03:57:48 PM
Well done on germinating Tropaeolum azureum.
Over the years we have had a lot of problems getting seed to germinate now I just scatter it in the sand beds where it seeds around happily over twenty seedlings are growing in the latest sand bed I converted last summer.

Best advice for young seedlings is feed every time you water and keep them growing for a long as possible which may mean keeping them cool in summer! If they get too hot or dry they will immediately go dormant.
Thanks, Ian,  I will try to keep them cool and well fed.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on March 28, 2018, 12:24:53 PM
Erythronium and Crocus are the main flowers appearing in Bulb Log 1318.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar281522236136BULB_LOG_1318.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Mar281522236136BULB_LOG_1318.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on April 04, 2018, 11:16:34 AM
Ian is away today - speaking about Erythroniums to the SRGC Stirling Group, in advance of his appearances at Inverewe for the Erythronium Festival next week,  so it's up to me to give you this week's Bulb Log  link....

"Despite the repeating return of winter weather Rhododendrons and Corydalis join in with the other spring flowers bringing more colour to the Bulb Log."

http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr031522779861BULB_LOG_1418.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr031522779861BULB_LOG_1418.pdf)

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on April 05, 2018, 09:35:13 AM
This is surely the best time in your garden, flowering rhododendrons, hellebores, snowdrops, corydalis, hepatica and erythronium starting now. You have a really nice Helleborus, peach coloured (picture just before that first also very nice blueish Hepatica). :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on April 11, 2018, 11:40:48 AM
Ian is away again -  at Inverewe for the Erythronium Festival - so I'm  on Bulb Log  loading duty!

[attachimg=1]

Bulb Log 1518
 corydalis carpets and  spring  flowers

http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr111523442939BULB_LOG_1518.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr111523442939BULB_LOG_1518.pdf)

[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on April 18, 2018, 11:28:39 AM
The colours of Corydalis welcomed me home plus some of my impressions from my trip  to Inverewe Gardens.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr181524046866BULB_LOG_1618.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr181524046866BULB_LOG_1618.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on April 23, 2018, 08:30:34 PM
..............................A couple of weeks ago I bought a 2 Ltr pot of L. vernum from a local Garden Centre (a surprising purchase opportunity?) and these have also been planted in the garden and are showing about 2" noses.

And there was I praising my local independent garden centre. It turned out to be Leucojum aestivum and not vernum. Of well, such is life!!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on April 25, 2018, 10:15:42 AM
Such is life David sadly that happens all too often although you should not be disappointed with Leucojum aestivum it is a fine plant.
I will let you have some L. vernum later if I get round to splitting some of our clumps.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on April 25, 2018, 11:17:38 AM
Erythronium big time in the Bulb Log.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr251524651300BULB_LOG_1718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Apr251524651300BULB_LOG_1718.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Robert on April 25, 2018, 02:43:34 PM
Hi Ian,

As usual, I enjoyed reading your recent issue of the Bulb Log. I do have a few questions. It was a little unclear to me if the photograph of Erythronium aff. grandiflorum Mount Prevost BC in your garden represents an individual or a whole population with similar uniform characteristics? In addition, has anyone done a follow up survey(s) of this population(s)? I would enjoy reading additional published information regarding this wild population. I am very curious. Thank you for your time.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on April 25, 2018, 05:29:42 PM
I have the same questions Robert, it is an isolated population that I think needs studying in the wild.
The small number of plants that I have flowered share similar characteristics and are very different from any of the other forms of E.  grandiflorum that we grow.
Hopefully the pot of seedlings I have germinating now will result in more flowering plants for me to study in around 5 years but still not good enough to be definitive about identity that work needs to be done in the field.
Interestingly I believe it grows in roughly the same locality as Trillium hibbersonii which some say is just a from of T. ovatum.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Robert on April 26, 2018, 01:45:40 AM
Hi Ian,

It seems like it is going to take some dedicated volunteer effort to clarify the understanding of this unusual Erythronium. I did a Google search of Erythronium grandiflorum Mount Prevost BC. The references brought me back to the SRGC Forum. Other references of acknowledge subspecies/varieties did not turn up anything that seemed to match the plants from Mount Prevost or your garden. Hopefully, someone can investigate the Mount Prevost region and gather on site data that can add to our understanding of this interesting Erythronium. New information may help clarify your findings as the next batch of seedlings come into bloom.

I hope folks appreciate the decades of dedicated effort you have undertaken adding to our knowledge of the Genus Erythronium. Very  8)  !
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 02, 2018, 10:34:03 AM
Walking among Erythronium in this Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May021525253474BULB_LOG_1818.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May021525253474BULB_LOG_1818.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 09, 2018, 09:38:15 AM
Bulb Log 1918 is full of flowers predominately but not exclusively Erythronium and Trillium.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May091525853765BULB_LOG_1918.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May091525853765BULB_LOG_1918.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Diane Whitehead on May 10, 2018, 02:44:49 AM
it is an isolated population that I think needs studying in the wild.

Interestingly I believe it grows in roughly the same locality as Trillium hibbersonii which some say is just a from of T. ovatum.

No, Mt Prevost is nowhere near where hibbersonii was found. Vancouver Island is big.  The two are about 200 km apart as the eagle flies - no roads and a lot of mountains in between.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 10, 2018, 09:50:17 AM
Thanks for the correction Diane, my memory is not always accurate:-))

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on May 10, 2018, 07:54:58 PM
Bulb Log 1918 is full of flowers predominately but not exclusively Erythronium and

Really, 1918. That's even older than me!? ;D
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 11, 2018, 09:34:50 AM
Really, 1918. That's even older than me!? ;D

Bulb Log 19 of 2018 :P
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Michael J Barrett on May 16, 2018, 08:37:59 AM
Fascinating reading, and wonderful to see and read  about the differences in hybrids. The photos (as always) leave me in awe and inspired for our spring in the Southern Hemispheres later in the year. Iíve worked on getting a very modest erythronium collection started, after having a few for a couple of years now. Thanks Ian.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 16, 2018, 10:52:42 AM
Thank you Michael, great to see you have joined the SRGC Forum and I hope your Erythronium thrive in your garden.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 16, 2018, 10:54:02 AM
This is the 800th Bulb Log - I have been writing and posting it online every week since January 2003.

The Bulb Log Diary covers a lot more than bulbs and this week I feature Rhododendrons.

Please click the link to view all 25 pages of pictures and text.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May161526464085BULB_LOG_2018.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May161526464085BULB_LOG_2018.pdf)

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on May 20, 2018, 09:52:00 AM
Very many thanks Ian, here's to the next 800.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 23, 2018, 11:12:06 AM
Very many thanks Ian, here's to the next 800.

Thanks David, I cannot say how long the Bulb Log will go on, perhaps I can sustain it for a few more years, but there will not be another 800.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 23, 2018, 11:13:03 AM
Be sure to click the link where you will see Ramonda, Jankaemonda, Trilliums, Rhododendrons and Pinguicula  among the many flowers that I share in this Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May231527069951BULB_LOG_2118.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May231527069951BULB_LOG_2118.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 30, 2018, 11:34:52 AM
The summer has come in Bulb Log 22 where we are having the warmest driest period for this time of year that I can remember. Plenty of flowers on Fritillaria, Paeonia, Corydalis, etc...


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May301527674236BULB_LOG_2218.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018May301527674236BULB_LOG_2218.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: tonyg on May 30, 2018, 10:10:12 PM
The summer has come in Bulb Log 22 where we are having the warmest driest period for this time of year that I can remember. Plenty of flowers on Fritillaria, Paeonia, Corydalis, etc...

The cover picture is outstanding Ian, real eye catcher.  As always the garden looks wonderful.

When and how do you take cuttings from those Salix featured?  I grow both and would like to make more to spread around.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Yann on May 30, 2018, 10:19:42 PM
I missed the last 2 isssues, it's now repaired. Marvellous Ramonda  :o
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 31, 2018, 12:43:16 PM
The cover picture is outstanding Ian, real eye catcher.  As always the garden looks wonderful.

When and how do you take cuttings from those Salix featured?  I grow both and would like to make more to spread around.

Tony, thanks for your kind comments.
I have been taking cuttings from the Salix over the last month since new growth started these are all rooted and growing on. I have been rooting them under a mist unit but have also rooted them at other times of the year by just placing them in sand and keeping them moist, most root very easily.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on May 31, 2018, 12:46:47 PM
I missed the last 2 isssues, it's now repaired. Marvellous Ramonda  :o

Thank you Yann it is good to have your continuing support.
Many of the plants and the gardeners have been struggling in the recent and rare heatwave.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on June 02, 2018, 07:55:02 AM
I always read bulb log though I don't comment much. :)  This time I have to thank you for the information that Fritillaria camschatcensis from Alaska is different than Eurasian form. I have now flowering plants which I got from Alaska a few years back and I was wondering about their color, but now I know they are the colour they should be. :) Mostly here you can see only the "black" form.
Your Paeonia obovata has very nice open flowers, mine are more cup shaped.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on June 06, 2018, 11:15:43 AM
 The Bulb Log where summer flowers enjoy the sunshine in the raised beds and troughs while others feel the heat and prefer shade.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun061528279597BULB_LOG_2318.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun061528279597BULB_LOG_2318.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on June 06, 2018, 11:16:41 AM
I always read bulb log though I don't comment much. :)  This time I have to thank you for the information that Fritillaria camschatcensis from Alaska is different than Eurasian form. I have now flowering plants which I got from Alaska a few years back and I was wondering about their color, but now I know they are the colour they should be. :) Mostly here you can see only the "black" form.
Your Paeonia obovata has very nice open flowers, mine are more cup shaped.

Thank you Leena for your support and kind words.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on June 06, 2018, 09:47:16 PM
Lovely Bulb Log Ian, not that they aren't always
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: tonyg on June 07, 2018, 09:20:57 AM
Thanks for showing the propagation set up.  Making me think I should invest in a mist unit :-)

Edrianthus serpyllifolium a gem ..... going on my wants list for the next seed exchange.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Carolyn on June 07, 2018, 11:42:53 AM
Ian,
I am interested to see that you are growing Maianthemum bifolium v. yakushimanum.  I hope it proves to be better behaved than Maianthemum bifolium v. kamtschaticum in my garden, where it has turned into an absolute thug, impossible to eradicate. It spreads by underground runners. In its defence, it may be OK in drier gardens, and its leaves and flowers are lovely, slugs don't bother with them. Cornus canadensis is another plant running through one of my borders, but at least it grows less densely and gives other plants a chance.
The bulblog is a joy to read, as always. Thanks!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on June 13, 2018, 10:53:02 AM
Thank you all for your kind feedback I always enjoy reading your comments -  here is this weeks Bulb Log.

The main influence on our garden is revealed and illustrated in this Bulb Log along with flowering Poppies, Peony and many other plants please click the link to see all 23 pages.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun131528883104BULB_LOG_2418.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun131528883104BULB_LOG_2418.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on June 20, 2018, 09:32:09 AM
Self-seeding hardy garden orchids,Dactylorhiza, are the feature of this Bulb Log.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun201529483296BULB_LOG_2518.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun201529483296BULB_LOG_2518.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: tonyg on June 25, 2018, 09:51:41 AM
Tony, thanks for your kind comments.
I have been taking cuttings from the Salix over the last month since new growth started these are all rooted and growing on. I have been rooting them under a mist unit but have also rooted them at other times of the year by just placing them in sand and keeping them moist, most root very easily.
Just a few weeks later and I have some cuttings rooted in damp sand using two plastic soft fruit containers as a mini propagator  :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on June 25, 2018, 11:09:27 AM
A success story for propagation and primary recycling!!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on June 27, 2018, 11:05:46 AM
Bulb Log 26 is a special edition with my report from the scenic and flower rich Uists, click the link to view all 36 pages.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun271530093701BULB_LOG_2618.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jun271530093701BULB_LOG_2618.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Sally on June 27, 2018, 01:29:05 PM
Thank you, Ian, for yet another wonderful Bulb Log. 

Sally, south of Lewiston, Idaho; Zone 5ish
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: samsgarden on June 27, 2018, 04:11:23 PM
Thank you for this trip log, Ian. Gratifying views of the 'Machair' and outer islands wildflowers as is the weekly views of your gardens.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on June 29, 2018, 01:05:53 PM
Thank you Sally and Sharon for your kind words I am happy to hear that you join me each week:-))
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Yann on June 29, 2018, 08:48:42 PM
Interesting to see you've more or less the plants as in my region, 800 miles separating us.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on July 04, 2018, 11:20:32 AM
Nomocharis, Lilies, Arisaema and Rocscoea are all flowering in what is an unusually hot dry summer here at the Bulb Log.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul041530699387BULB_LOG_2718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul041530699387BULB_LOG_2718.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on July 11, 2018, 11:07:09 AM
Despite the continuing summer drought the Bulb Log offers up garden delights and highlights.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul111531303396BULB_LOG_2818.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul111531303396BULB_LOG_2818.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on July 18, 2018, 11:37:13 AM
The Bulb Log where the garden and gardeners are feeling the heat, re -potting and potting mixes has started ,  and Roscoea display their flowers............


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul181531909057BULB_LOG_2918.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul181531909057BULB_LOG_2918.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Yann on July 18, 2018, 05:33:55 PM
another pretty good log, thank you Ian!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: annew on July 22, 2018, 08:34:17 PM
Your garden still looks lush and gorgeous despite the heat. Those Harvington Roscoeas are beautiful, are they hybrids?
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on July 23, 2018, 10:51:17 AM
Your garden still looks lush and gorgeous despite the heat. Those Harvington Roscoeas are beautiful, are they hybrids?

Anne
 I don't know for sure if they are hybrids or just selections but they are beautiful- they are also fertile as I have self sowing seedlings around some of the plants.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on July 25, 2018, 10:35:02 AM
In this Bulb Log I review growth in troughs, the bulb house sand beds, hedge cutting and make a sad announcement.


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul251532511029BULB_LOG_3018.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Jul251532511029BULB_LOG_3018.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: ashley on July 25, 2018, 12:09:52 PM
I'm so sorry to hear your news Ian and Maggi, and hope she slipped away peacefully.  Parting is very hard.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 01, 2018, 11:30:42 AM
Click the link to this weeks Bulb Log with Roscoea 'Harvington Imperial', Explorers Garden in Pitlochry and lots more of interest.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug011533113122BULB_LOG_3118.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug011533113122BULB_LOG_3118.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: bibliofloris on August 01, 2018, 04:43:07 PM
Itís so interesting to me to see the many ways your climate is similar to and different from mine, here near Seattle. Here, although it rarely gets above 85 F (~29.5 C) in summer, we have almost no rain from July through September. Itís still much greener here in summer than where I grew up, in northern California, but I still love the way the plantsí relief after rain that you describe! (Crossing my fingers for a bit later this week...)

I would expect many of the plants that are native to my part of the world to have done relatively well in your areaís drought, since the lack of summer rain combined with massive quantities of shallow-rooted native trees leave very little summer water in the woods. (Though nurse logs do help.) Shrubs like Vaccinium ovatum, Ribes sanguineum, and Mahonia nervosa look dusty, but fine, and our sword ferns hold up pretty well. Camassias grown near water here, though, so might be an exception. (And almost everything in my garden gets powdery mildew at this time of year, alas!)

Many non-native shrubs like rhododendrons and camellias are very drought-tolerant here as well, and are commonly grown here, but I donít see much growth in summer.

Glad to hear you got some rain at last!
Kelly


Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 04, 2018, 10:48:51 AM
Great to hear from you Kelly, it is always interesting to compare how plants respond to climate in different parts of the world.

We are still getting some exceptionally hot days, yesterday it hit 26C which is very hot for us but for some 10 days we have been getting rain as well with cooler nights and I am noticing new growths on many plants that were, like I was,  struggling to cope in the hot dry conditions.
If this last one year the plants should survive if it were to become a pattern many of the plants we grow will have to change, some doors will close and others will open.

 
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: bibliofloris on August 05, 2018, 07:11:29 PM
Actually, Iím noticing more differences in cultivation practices than in plant choices. Many of the wonderful gardens here near Seattle grow some of the same plants you do, which makes sense, given that our springs, autumns, and winters are similar. I would guess that the strains we grow have adapted to our climates, but so have the gardeners. For example, many here group plants according to summer water needs, when minimizing watering is a priority. Since I grew up in a drought-prone area, I use drip irrigation in summer, which is uncommon here, but very common in California.

Itís amazing to see how lush your garden looks in summer, even in a drought year! And yes, Iíve had a lot in common with my drooping plants lately too! Fingers crossed many of yours have survived this hopefully exceptional year.
Kelly
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 08, 2018, 09:58:34 AM
Actually, Iím noticing more differences in cultivation practices than in plant choices. Many of the wonderful gardens here near Seattle grow some of the same plants you do, which makes sense, given that our springs, autumns, and winters are similar. I would guess that the strains we grow have adapted to our climates, but so have the gardeners. For example, many here group plants according to summer water needs, when minimizing watering is a priority. Since I grew up in a drought-prone area, I use drip irrigation in summer, which is uncommon here, but very common in California.

Itís amazing to see how lush your garden looks in summer, even in a drought year! And yes, Iíve had a lot in common with my drooping plants lately too! Fingers crossed many of yours have survived this hopefully exceptional year.
Kelly

It is interesting how our perceptions are relative - I think our garden looks quite bare at this time of year, mostly because most of our ground growth is spring and early summer growing, while you think it looks lush:-)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 08, 2018, 11:31:08 AM
Click the link for the Bulb Log that this week looks at flowers and pollinators.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug081533724031BULB_LOG_3218.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug081533724031BULB_LOG_3218.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 15, 2018, 11:54:22 AM
The twists and turns of a day's work in this Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug151534330274BULB_LOG_3318.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug151534330274BULB_LOG_3318.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Gabriela on August 16, 2018, 01:22:01 AM
Ian - after the first lines of the blog I kept smiling all the way to the end :)
You described so well the way a garden day journey goes by, probably familiar to many others here; well, maybe not as rich as yours.

I may repeat myself but with every log I admire your discipline for writing regularly and taking pictures during various task in the garden. I know it is not easy to interrupt for taking pictures while doing something in the garden; but so many valuable lessons for all of us!

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 16, 2018, 11:47:03 AM
Thank you for your kind words Gabriela, it is the feedback and encouragement that helps me to keep going.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: annew on August 18, 2018, 08:24:02 PM
 :D :D I was the same , it is like a chain reaction, one thing leads to another until sometimes it's difficult to remember why you went up the garden in the first place! What a lovely surprise to discover the helleborine, word must have got round that this garden was a great place to live  ;)
Fascinating resting buds on the Craigton Purple, quite unlike the C solidas that are the only ones I have grown.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 22, 2018, 11:16:55 AM
Thank you Anne, I think most gardeners will be familiar with these knock on effects when working in the garden - yes and I am all too familiar with not remembering what I went up  the garden for and not just in the garden ::)


Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 22, 2018, 11:17:47 AM
Click the link to read this Bulb Log with another week of Rhododendron, mixed tasks, planting, repotting, cuttings, also the start of the autumn flowering bulbs .

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug221534930320BULB_LOG_3418.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug221534930320BULB_LOG_3418.pdf)


Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: hadacekf on August 22, 2018, 04:24:17 PM

This is another very informative bulb log Ian.
This is a very informative bulb log Ian. I like it very much. There is currently a huge difference between the two gardens. We have a temperature of 30 į - 34 į C. for 6 weeks and no rain. My garden has a desert-like appearance.
Franz
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 22, 2018, 05:31:57 PM
Thank you Franz, I think most of us have been experiencing unusual weather this year - while our weather does change from year to year these have been extreme.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 29, 2018, 11:24:55 AM
Click on the link for the Bulb Log with the fruits and flowers of autumn plus nature the greatest inventor.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug291535536689BULB_LOG_3518.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Aug291535536689BULB_LOG_3518.pdf)

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Rick R. on August 29, 2018, 04:50:07 PM
Ian, even though so many things you grow are not possible for me here in Minnesota (USA), I never miss reading even one.  I find your Bulb Logs incredibly useful, as your methods, ideas and portrayals are adaptable in so many other ways , if not directly.

If I were to post here each time I felt gratitude for your time spent composing the bulb log and teaching in your special way, I would be writing each week.  Instead, I attempt to shower you with well deserved accolades, perhaps yearly, with sincere and heartfelt appreciation.

As I leaned back in my chair reading this bulb log, I was struck again my one of your impressive, well prepared bulb portraits of Colchicum.  Itís always been an enigma to me, how and why these bulbs so ďstrangelyĒ grow.  Yet another "Aha" moment that inserted glee in my life.

So this Bulb Log edition that focuses on "not flowers" has prompted me to express some of my admiration, as the entire life cycle of plants is both interesting and important, and this culture of knowledge taught here as well as within the SRGC in general is invaluable and not commonly found.

 Thank you !!!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on August 29, 2018, 06:42:38 PM
Very well written Rick and I heartily second your appreciation.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on August 29, 2018, 06:50:07 PM
Rick
Thank you for such a kind appreciation of my work it is very gratifying to know that my fascination of plants is shared among so many.

Also thank you David for your support .
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 05, 2018, 11:43:04 AM
Bulb Log 36 brings the September storm when I water the bulb houses to start the season plus autumn flowers are blooming in the garden.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep051536139026BULB_LOG_3618.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep051536139026BULB_LOG_3618.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Gerdk on September 06, 2018, 12:19:56 PM
Ian,
Like you I gave all my bulbs with a preference for a warm and dry summer rest your ' Septemberstorm ' treatment.
I remember that you once wrote in an older log (can't find it) that the date for this first watering could be changed in latitudes south of Scotland.
I would be glad if you will let me know which idea is behind this.
I might suggest that the amount of light for the coming growing season is one reason, i. e. in the south a later start is possible because there is a longer periode of sufficient light expected, but maybe I am wrong.

Gerd
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on September 06, 2018, 12:23:51 PM
Hello Gerd- Ian is away today - but I m sure he will answer you  later.  :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: sokol on September 07, 2018, 08:41:02 AM
Gerd, I also do this like Ian.

I have repotted some pots yesterday and root growth has started in most pots. Some pots contained bulbs with and without roots. So it can't be wrong to water them now.

One problem seems to be that plants come into growth too early as the winters are too mild in parts of Britain. I don't have this problem as we have always cold enough winters.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 07, 2018, 09:20:15 AM
Ian,
Like you I gave all my bulbs with a preference for a warm and dry summer rest your ' Septemberstorm ' treatment.
I remember that you once wrote in an older log (can't find it) that the date for this first watering could be changed in latitudes south of Scotland.
I would be glad if you will let me know which idea is behind this.
I might suggest that the amount of light for the coming growing season is one reason, i. e. in the south a later start is possible because there is a longer periode of sufficient light expected, but maybe I am wrong.

Gerd

Thanks for your comments Gerd.
In warmer parts than ours the temperature gradient that I believe triggers the bulbs into growth generally comes later - you just need to look at a weather map  we are already getting close to 0C at nights.
I have considered light as one of the parameters that could trigger the growth and have concluded that it cannot have a direct effect  but indirectly it does as longer daylight hours will influence the temperatures.
Watering the bulbs too early while they are still in summer rest can cause wet rot and fungal diseases so it is important to know from careful observation when your bulbs are ready to root.


Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 07, 2018, 09:27:15 AM
Gerd, I also do this like Ian.

I have repotted some pots yesterday and root growth has started in most pots. Some pots contained bulbs with and without roots. So it can't be wrong to water them now.

One problem seems to be that plants come into growth too early as the winters are too mild in parts of Britain. I don't have this problem as we have always cold enough winters.

Thank you for your comments Sokol the more we share our observations the more we can learn from each other.
Yes you are correct the bulbs are ready and waiting for water when you see root growth.

You have also identified one of the big challenges we face in our climate is the very erratic nature of our winter where sudden mild conditions can cause the bulb to grow only for the temperatures to plunge down once more and this cycle is often repeated several times in a winter.
I would love a good cold winter followed by a warm bright spring but that rarely happens in Aberdeen.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Gerdk on September 08, 2018, 06:45:44 AM
Maggi & Ian,
Thanks you for your kind help.

@ Ian: I see that I have to treat my bulbs individually. So with some of them I will start later
than beginning of September.
With all of the bulbs which I gave a resting periode with artificial heat (mainly autumn flowering daffodils)
the ' start ' at the the beginning of September seems to work because there are no losses because of
rot and they can use the better light conditions of an earlier begin.

Gerd
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 12, 2018, 09:29:50 AM
What is a garden?
Click the link to read this week's Bulb log 3718.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep121536740381BULB_LOG_3718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep121536740381BULB_LOG_3718.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: John85 on September 12, 2018, 04:59:36 PM
Ian,
Do you have a picture of the little plant umbrellas as seen on the old picture(the one with grass)?
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on September 12, 2018, 06:04:24 PM
John, those are old-fashioned  barn cloches - cannot find any  photos of ours right  now  so here are some from the internet..

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
These last two photo from this site  - click  here (http://glangwili-farm.blogspot.com/2012/08/how-to-assemble-barn-cloche.html)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 19, 2018, 11:24:38 AM
Autumn colchicum and autumn crocus provide the colour in this  week's Bulb Log click the link to see all 23 pages.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep191537352318BULB_LOG_3818.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep191537352318BULB_LOG_3818.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Carolyn on September 22, 2018, 03:31:49 PM
Ian,
Another interesting bulb log, thank you.  I notice that you have cyclamen hederifolium and coum growing close together in one of your beds. Most of the articles about cyclamen in the garden suggest that it is better to keep these two apart, as cyc hed will outgrow coum and be a bit of a thug.  I used to follow this advice, but the ants in my garden have other ideas and have scattered the seeds, so I now have mixed plantings in some places. The two species seem to co-exist quite happily (so far). Do you find that coum is able to cope with hederifolium in the longer term?
Another combination which has happened is C. coum and intaminatum, which seems to work well.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 23, 2018, 11:32:22 AM
Thanks for your comments Carolyn.

The Cyclamen coum and hederifolium have grown there from seed and so far seem perfectly happy companions - I will exercise an element of control by collecting the seeds in that sand bed as there are probably enough of cyclamen there now.

I have also read the advice that you mention and it may prove to be sound but I have found that such advice is often repeated, verbally and in print,  through many years to the point where  nobody knows the reason why it was given in the first place so I prefer to run my own trials and learn from my own mistakes.

Trust your ants;-))


Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on September 26, 2018, 11:47:08 AM
Autumn colours continue to delight in this week's Bulb Log with more Crocus and Colchicum flowers appearing every day......

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep261537952595BULB_LOG_3918.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Sep261537952595BULB_LOG_3918.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 03, 2018, 11:26:58 AM
Autumn flowering crocus and colchicum continue flowering and I  cannot resist sharing them in this week's Bulb Log


[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct031538560553BULB_LOG_4018.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct031538560553BULB_LOG_4018.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 10, 2018, 11:32:04 AM
Narcissus and Galanthus join in with the other autumn flowering bulbs in this Bulb Log.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct101539167298BULB_LOG_4118.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct101539167298BULB_LOG_4118.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 17, 2018, 11:48:29 AM
Autumn storms turn the garden red in the Bulb Log

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct171539767380BULB_LOG_4218.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct171539767380BULB_LOG_4218.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: bibliofloris on October 19, 2018, 04:16:50 PM
I love the beauty of decaying leaves and collapsing plants too ó how they change color and even form. Thanks for sharing this glimpse.

Iím curious about your Fuchsia procumbens seed capsules ó do you remove them as they start to turn red, and let them ripen inside? Or do you discard them, to keep the slugs away from your plants? Iím growing it for the first time, and those seed capsules look quite different from the dark purple ones Iím used to, on Fuchsia magellanica, etc.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 22, 2018, 02:37:59 PM
I love the beauty of decaying leaves and collapsing plants too ó how they change color and even form. Thanks for sharing this glimpse.

Iím curious about your Fuchsia procumbens seed capsules ó do you remove them as they start to turn red, and let them ripen inside? Or do you discard them, to keep the slugs away from your plants? Iím growing it for the first time, and those seed capsules look quite different from the dark purple ones Iím used to, on Fuchsia magellanica, etc.

Thank you for getting in touch Kelly.

Yes if you want the seed it is best to remove them before they turn red - the seed is perfectly viable when the capsule is green and the fruits are incredibly tasty to rodents, slugs, birds among others. I will be showing the seeds in an upcoming Bulb Log.

Apart from eating the seed capsule slugs have not been a  issue with this  plant  all the above ground growth dies down in most of our winters reappearing again next year.

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 24, 2018, 11:19:00 AM
Autumn leaves provide a valuable resource and make surprising patterns, Crocus flowers in the garden and under glass, a mollusc hotel, click the Bulb Log link to read all.....

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct241540375209BULB_LOG_4318.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct241540375209BULB_LOG_4318.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Joakim B on October 29, 2018, 03:44:14 PM
Dear Ian I have been enjoying the Bulb logs and read many of them in the last days with great joy ;D
I have been reading both backwards and from last year at this time and forwards, any way of reading them has be great fun!
If I may have a request? It is that common English names on trees (weeds etc) could also get the botanical names so that non English readers faster understand what it is. It is not often I need to ponder but when reading a few month of posts there are some so having that in mind would be making it even easier for Your readers.
 It is a great fun to read and I have also been enjoying the video logs. A great addition to the concept I must say.
Thanks again for doing this nice work and hope it is ok to come with suggestion on such a nice work.
Kind regards
Joakim
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: David Nicholson on October 29, 2018, 06:50:52 PM
A warm welcome back to the Forum Joakim, it's soooooo long since you were last with us.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 29, 2018, 07:20:15 PM
Dear Ian I have been enjoying the Bulb logs and read many of them in the last days with great joy ;D
I have been reading both backwards and from last year at this time and forwards, any way of reading them has be great fun!
If I may have a request? It is that common English names on trees (weeds etc) could also get the botanical names so that non English readers faster understand what it is. It is not often I need to ponder but when reading a few month of posts there are some so having that in mind would be making it even easier for Your readers.
 It is a great fun to read and I have also been enjoying the video logs. A great addition to the concept I must say.
Thanks again for doing this nice work and hope it is ok to come with suggestion on such a nice work.
Kind regards
Joakim

Thank you for getting in touch Joachim and giving me feedback I am always open to suggestions. I am aware that many of the readers are not in the UK and do try and qualify common names by using botanical names - I will pay more attention to that in future.
Thank you again for your kind words and welcome back to the forum.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Joakim B on October 30, 2018, 11:33:59 AM
Thanks for the welcome back Ian and David and thanks for having us non native speakers in mind Ian. Name of trees and weeds tend to be the last things I learn in a new language.
A big thank You to Maggi that helped me getting my old account back again  :-*
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on October 31, 2018, 11:26:09 AM
The colours of autumn leaves and Crocus, collecting and sowing seed, a look at some of the troughs and a review of a new book on trough making all waiting for you to click the link.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct311540984573BULB_LOG_4418.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Oct311540984573BULB_LOG_4418.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: bibliofloris on October 31, 2018, 03:34:10 PM
Thanks for the seed capsule photos, Ian! Iím always a little nervous that Iíll pick the ones I donít know well too early, so itís very helpful to see.
Kelly
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Joakim B on November 01, 2018, 12:31:34 PM
Dear Ian
Which are the 2 cyclamen that You have in the photo of C longiflorus?
I have read earlier that You remove the leafs that fall on top of cyclamen, also outside. Does that not also remove some frost protection?

Have You tried seeding in cyclamen in Your drive way? Or is it to sunny/ exposed for them that they will not make it? In our garden ants do a lot of the seeding of cyclamen so I am a bit surprised that You do not have any there?
Kind regards
Joakim
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 01, 2018, 01:07:51 PM
Thanks for the seed capsule photos, Ian! Iím always a little nervous that Iíll pick the ones I donít know well too early, so itís very helpful to see.
Kelly

You are welcome Kelly, I think we are all a bit too cautious sometimes we should be bold, not afraid to make mistakes and if we do learn from them.

 
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 01, 2018, 01:16:20 PM
Dear Ian
Which are the 2 cyclamen that You have in the photo of C longiflorus?
I have read earlier that You remove the leafs that fall on top of cyclamen, also outside. Does that not also remove some frost protection?

Have You tried seeding in cyclamen in Your drive way? Or is it to sunny/ exposed for them that they will not make it? In our garden ants do a lot of the seeding of cyclamen so I am a bit surprised that You do not have any there?
Kind regards
Joakim

The two you can see in the sand bed are Cyclamen are cyprium and mirable and yes we do have a few Cyclamen hederifolium in the drive way plantings but they tend to be hidden by the other growth especially the Geranium. I have not encouraged them in the drive because they are the only plant in leaf in the winter when I like to cut all the old growth down to the ground and the Cyclamen leaves don't make it easy.
I have found the Cyclamen leaves hardy in our garden without the need of being covered in leaf fall and being constantly covered in wet leaves can cause wet rots to get a hold.

There ants in our street but I have never seen any in our garden.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Paul Cumbleton on November 03, 2018, 04:46:46 PM
Hi Ian,
I seem to remember from previous Logs that you grow several Eucomis other than the Eucomis autumnalis ssp amaryllidiifolia that you show. I wondered if the seed you collected and sowed was open pollinated? - I have found that Eucomis are very promiscuous and whenever I have sown open pollinated seed I have ended up with hybrids between the various species that we grow. You probably know this already, but I thought perchance not I might save you the frustration of waiting a few years only to find things didn't turn out as expected! Having said that, occasionally the results may not be "pure" but can be very attractive.

Paul
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 03, 2018, 06:55:43 PM
Thanks for sharing your experiences Paul. It was open pollinated but the only other Eucomis in flower was E.  bicolor which was some distance away.
Thanks for your warning but I would not be too disappointed with hybrids especially if they prove hardier than the parent and will grow outside.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 07, 2018, 11:54:49 AM
A world of plants in this Bulb Log -click the link.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov071541591530BULB_LOG_4518.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov071541591530BULB_LOG_4518.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 14, 2018, 11:15:09 AM
Bulb Log with Galanthus, Crocus and Narcissus flowers under glass while outside there are more autumn leaves.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov141542193818BULB_LOG_4618.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov141542193818BULB_LOG_4618.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 21, 2018, 11:21:00 AM
Follow the link to this Bulb Log to see more Narcissus, Crocus and Hedera helix..............

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov211542797865BULB_LOG_4718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov211542797865BULB_LOG_4718.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 28, 2018, 11:59:22 AM
Despite the Bulb Log being under thick dark clouds, battered by wind and rain  the Narcissus continue flowering and the shoots of spring are revealed......

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov281543406263BULB_LOG_4818.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Nov281543406263BULB_LOG_4818.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: angie on November 28, 2018, 06:36:40 PM
Wow Ian you have made a really good job of your cloud tree in the front garden. Wish I had a good eye like you have. Must drive past and see it in the flesh as they say.

Angie  :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: ian mcdonald on November 28, 2018, 08:42:37 PM
Ian, always something of interest in your garden. Are you sure you want Erinus though? I have seen it in two places in the wild in Scotland, planted by some person who ought to know better and it is practically impossible to control once established.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: YT on November 29, 2018, 10:03:41 AM
Hello, Ian and the forum members :) The weather here is oddly mild for the moment and a potfull ‘Craigton Chorister’ looks coming into flower next week :D Their leaves are a little bit taller and buds are glowing quicker than the usual by the very warm temperature.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 29, 2018, 01:21:00 PM
Wow Ian you have made a really good job of your cloud tree in the front garden. Wish I had a good eye like you have. Must drive past and see it in the flesh as they say.

Angie  :)

Thank you Angie don't just drive by drop in:-)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 29, 2018, 01:24:19 PM
Ian, always something of interest in your garden. Are you sure you want Erinus though? I have seen it in two places in the wild in Scotland, planted by some person who ought to know better and it is practically impossible to control once established.

We have grown Erinus alpinus for years and in our garden it is quite well behaved.
I do agree that it should not be spread to the wild although you will find it naturalised on walls and buildings in many towns.

Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on November 29, 2018, 01:27:16 PM
Hello, Ian and the forum members :) The weather here is oddly mild for the moment and a potfull ĎCraigton Choristerí looks coming into flower next week :D Their leaves are a little bit taller and buds are glowing quicker than the usual by the very warm temperature.

Yes that does look to be growing taller than it has done for you in previuos years Tatsuo but I am still envious as ours is three times as tall as that and still growing.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Maggi Young on November 29, 2018, 02:13:21 PM
Thank you Angie don't just drive by drop in:-)
Kettle on every day at 3pm, Angela!! !!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: angie on November 29, 2018, 05:16:27 PM
Kettle on every day at 3pm, Angela!! !!

Sounds great to me  ;D ;D ;D

Angie  :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Matt T on November 29, 2018, 08:44:28 PM
N. 'Craigton Chorister' is in flower here too! My first watering was not made until mid-October, some 6 weeks after Ian's first storm. Interesting that it made no difference to flowering date! Temperature cues are likely to be more important than moisture. I've not measured it, but could try if the wind ever dies down!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on December 05, 2018, 12:11:33 PM
The Bulb Log continues to flower through the dark days of winter.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec051544008114BULB_LOG_4918.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec051544008114BULB_LOG_4918.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: bibliofloris on December 06, 2018, 04:30:39 PM
What a beautiful small narcissus, Ian! I hadnít ever grown the ďpetticoatĒ types, but ordered ĎJulia Janeí after seeing photos of yours and the other rock gardenersí last season. Iím excited to see it bloom in person.

Thanks for sharing the ongoing process of selecting and growing on a cultivar, too. Itís something Iíve never read much about, and I find it very interesting.

Perhaps what I mean to say is thank you for continuing to speak to comparative beginners, too. :)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on December 07, 2018, 10:39:17 AM
What a beautiful small narcissus, Ian! I hadnít ever grown the ďpetticoatĒ types, but ordered ĎJulia Janeí after seeing photos of yours and the other rock gardenersí last season. Iím excited to see it bloom in person.

Thanks for sharing the ongoing process of selecting and growing on a cultivar, too. Itís something Iíve never read much about, and I find it very interesting.

Perhaps what I mean to say is thank you for continuing to speak to comparative beginners, too. :)

Thank you Kelly hopefully you will  get some seed from your ĎJulia Janeí then you can start for yourself the process of growing and selecting bulbs from seed. Growing bulbs from seed should carry a warning that it becomes addictive because the excitement you feel when you first flower a bulb you have raised from seed never diminishes.
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on December 12, 2018, 10:46:55 AM
Opening with a still life I am reminded that time does not stand still click the link to find out why I am looking back through sixteen years of Bulb Logs.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec121544609297BULB_LOG_5018.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec121544609297BULB_LOG_5018.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on December 19, 2018, 12:10:32 PM
 This Bulb Log looks at the 'Craigton' Cultivars and could be sub titled here is one I made earlier.

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec191545221205BULB_LOG_5118.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec191545221205BULB_LOG_5118.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Leena on December 19, 2018, 04:11:01 PM
The final picture in today's bulb log is so beautiful! So are all of your Erythroniums. :)
I also liked your Corydalis 'Craigton Red', besides nice flowers above foliage, it has very pretty foliage, so small-leaved, I don't know the correct word in English. Its foliage lookes more like C.kusnetzovii- hybrids or C.wendelboi, or C.vittae foliage, but flowers so red like with C.solida.
C.'Craigton Blue' is the most famous of blue Corydalis at least here. It seems that when there is a C.flexuosa -hybrid blue Corydalis for sale, it's name is always 'Craigton Blue'. I have three plants bought here with that name, and all of them flower earlier than your real CB even when they are grown in the same bed, so they must be different plants than the original. There are also differences in the foliage, but for most people here all blue Corydalis are the same. :o
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on December 26, 2018, 11:58:02 AM
Looking back through 2018 is the theme of the last Bulb Log of the year........

[attachimg=1]
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec261545824994BULB_LOG_5218.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Dec261545824994BULB_LOG_5218.pdf)
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Rick R. on December 26, 2018, 10:04:21 PM
Ian, I am silent mostly, but be assured that my respect and gratitude continues to grow with time.  Your knowledge, thoughts, theories, art, design, photography and writing weave a cohesive and easy to read content.  A simple Thank you is quite inadequate, but it will have to do.  And thank you, also, to everyone that makes this project possible.

I really like the review theme to your Bulb Logs at the end of the years.  Especially since you include the covers of the previous logs, it jogs one's memories.  For instance, you have prompted a question in my mind:

In Bulb Log 07 ( http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb141518606975BULB_LOG_0718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb141518606975BULB_LOG_0718.pdf) ) you had hope to get better seed set by keeping your potted Eranthis pinnatifida outside, instead in the greenhouse during flowering.  Were you successful?
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Ian Y on December 27, 2018, 11:23:32 AM
Ian, I am silent mostly, but be assured that my respect and gratitude continues to grow with time.  Your knowledge, thoughts, theories, art, design, photography and writing weave a cohesive and easy to read content.  A simple Thank you is quite inadequate, but it will have to do.  And thank you, also, to everyone that makes this project possible.

I really like the review theme to your Bulb Logs at the end of the years.  Especially since you include the covers of the previous logs, it jogs one's memories.  For instance, you have prompted a question in my mind:

In Bulb Log 07 ( http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb141518606975BULB_LOG_0718.pdf (http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2018Feb141518606975BULB_LOG_0718.pdf) ) you had hope to get better seed set by keeping your potted Eranthis pinnatifida outside, instead in the greenhouse during flowering.  Were you successful?

Rick,
thank you for your very kind words of appreciation. The reason I continue writing the Bulb Log is because of the encouragement I receive through the many ways we can communicate these days including when I am out and about.

In answer to your question no I did not get very much seed on the Eranthis pinnatifida this year but that was entirely down to the long period of freezing and very windy conditions at that time of year . The plants did grow on for longer than they would under glass so I hope they are now stronger I hope for better success and more favourable weather in 2019
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: Rick R. on December 27, 2018, 10:27:44 PM
Thanks, Ian.  I should have remembered the terrible and long suffering "spring" you all had in Europe this year.

Much Hope, Good Luck and Success for the New Year!
Title: Re: Bulb log 2018
Post by: annew on December 31, 2018, 05:56:59 PM
Thank you so much for another wonderful year of Bulb Logs, Ian. I always recommend them to beginners wanting to know more about growing bulbs, but your inquiring mind and refusal to accept 'received wisdom' is an inspiration to experienced growers as well.
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