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Author Topic: Honey Fungus  (Read 999 times)

brianw

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Honey Fungus
« on: October 29, 2012, 08:55:43 PM »
Does anyone have experience of dealing with honey fungus on bare uncultivated land, in this case in the corner of a new to be garden?
I discovered today an area of 2-3 square metres with several fruiting bodies (4-5" round mushrooms/fungi) of what I am fairly certain is honey fungus. This small area currently has no trees or shrubs on it but has recently had some small yew trees removed, and about 10 years ago a Laburnum cut down close by. It also has an ancient hedge alongside, which is now mainly ivy and Elm suckers, the remains of a former elm hedge. My guess is it is mainly living on the remains of the Laburnum, but could of course also be in the hedge. Most of the other scrub on the site has been grubbed out but this inevitably has left some, elm, hazel, buddleia, rose, nettle and bramble roots, and a large Bramley and some mature wild plum trees not far away. None of the mature trees show any significant signs yet, and the hedge will be thickened up and partially replanted over the next year or so. Elms have come and go over recent years, presumably due to Dutch elm disease.
I have lists of resistant or otherwise plants, and it might be feasable to remove some of the soil, but not all in view of the proximity of the hedge and road verge. Would it be worth drenching this area now with Armillatox or Jeyes Fluid, before or after I dig this area over to try and remove the more obvious rhizomorphs of the fungus?
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England


brianw

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Re: Honey Fungus
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2012, 11:26:56 PM »
Yes Maggi. I seem to have looked at most of them. I have read before about the potential risks associated with woodchips and the like for path mulches. Not sure what I will use when we get round to surfacing paths in  the wilder parts of the garden. In view of the susceptability of these fungi to high temperatures maybe I just need to hire a steam gun and inject the soil thoroughly.
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England

 


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