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Author Topic: Aroids (the family Araceae)  (Read 89610 times)

Maggi Young

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2009, 02:49:36 PM »
Good post, Rogan!
I've drawn atttention to it in the Arisaema pages  :)

...that's here, if anyone has missed them.... http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=3387.90
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2009, 09:44:44 PM »
So you think pollinators prefer to enter by a cool back door rather than a warmer front?
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2009, 09:53:41 PM »
So you think pollinators prefer to enter by a cool back door rather than a warmer front?
Well, no, Lesley, because there is  only one door, unless the pollinators chomp their way throught the lit back wall of the flower... which hardly seems worth the effort when the front opening of arisaemas is so large... :-X
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2009, 11:24:55 PM »
Well yes, I didn't think they had a choice but as the back is to the front (assuming the front is towards oneself, or rather assuming that what is to oneself is the front), then they go in by the back door which is, it seems to me, always facing away from where one can look at it. What I mean is..... blast it. Forget it.  ::) :-[ ??? ::) :-[ ???
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Paul T

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2009, 11:37:00 PM »
Lesley,

Sort of like the time travel conundrum..... if you travel back in time and kill your parents before you're born, how could you exist to go back and kill your parents, etc.  In your case the door you're at becomes the front door, so if you're trying to enter via the back door you never can because the back door becomes the front door when you're at it.  Wow, who woulda thunk we could get time travel analogies into arisaema discussion.  ;)
Cheers.

Paul T.
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cohan

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2009, 12:28:47 AM »
hmm, was the question why should an opening facing away from the light be more appealing to insects than an opening facing the light?

Paul T

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2009, 02:42:14 AM »
I think it is more that insects are attracted to light in many cases, and a dark opening is less likely to be entered?  With the Arisaemas the backs really are translucent and they almost glow through the opening, so maybe that works as a light attractant?  I really don't know for sure.
Cheers.

Paul T.
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Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

cohan

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2009, 03:50:46 AM »
okay, so then the answer to lesley's question is that if the flower faced the light, the opening would seem dark, better to have the light shining through to the shady side..(i know thats what you said, paul, just rephrasing it)..
interesting things plants do!

Lesley Cox

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #38 on: November 09, 2009, 04:32:04 AM »
Well I'm glad you two have what I said sorted and understood, 'cos I'm totally in the dark - about what I said, or meant. Is there a smiley thing for totally confused?
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Paul T

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #39 on: November 09, 2009, 04:56:55 AM »
Lesley,

In this case the "front door" would be the one entered from the sunny side.  The "back door" would be on the shady side.  The front door has now been changed to a stained glass window that can clearly be seen from the back door, inviting entry for a closer viewing.  Obviously the insects like a closer viewing of stained glass windows.  8)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

cohan

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #40 on: November 09, 2009, 05:12:15 AM »
Lesley,

In this case the "front door" would be the one entered from the sunny side.  The "back door" would be on the shady side.  The front door has now been changed to a stained glass window that can clearly be seen from the back door, inviting entry for a closer viewing.  Obviously the insects like a closer viewing of stained glass windows.  8)

lol---isnt that just poetic, paul! you have surely elevated the level of discourse!
lesley, i think you are looking for this smiley:   ???

Paul T

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #41 on: November 09, 2009, 05:23:42 AM »
Lesley, Cohan,

I tend to use the "undecided" smiley when confused or unsure about something ==>  :-\

Or the one you suggested Cohan if asking about something or querying something that has been said/read about/etc.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2009, 05:26:15 AM by Paul T »
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Rogan

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #42 on: November 09, 2009, 08:01:13 AM »
...now I'm confused too   ::)   ;D
Rogan Roth, near Swellendam, Western Cape, SA
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Anthony Darby

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #43 on: November 09, 2009, 06:58:10 PM »
Cypripedium flowers have windows at the back of the 'slipper' to draw the bees up through the escape route over the stigma and one of the stamens.
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
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Lesley Cox

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Re: Aroids (the family Araceae)
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2009, 08:32:00 PM »
lesley, i think you are looking for this smiley:   ???

Yes, I use that one a lot Cohan. :)



 edit by Maggi: further discussion on smileys removed to Aroid digression page!
« Last Edit: November 10, 2009, 08:15:42 PM by Maggi Young »
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

 


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