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Author Topic: Calochortus 2023  (Read 660 times)

Robert

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Calochortus 2023
« on: April 28, 2023, 07:40:43 PM »


When placed appropriately, Calochortus albus has been a very reliable, long-lived species in our Sacramento, California garden. We continue to breed and select new forms of this species hoping to both extend its range of garden adaptability, as well as fully utilize its genetic potential. Pictured is our Rock Creek form of this species grown from a seed accession from an elevation of 1,350 feet (411 meters) in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.



Calochortus monophyllus is another reliable species in our Sacramento garden, blooming consistently every season. Pictured is our Traverse Creek form grown from a seed accession gathered at an elevation of 2,540 feet (774 meters) in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. This small species exhibits considerable variation in its flowers. We will be sharing more photographs of this species and other species as the plants reach maturity.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: Calochortus 2023
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2023, 08:23:54 AM »
Robert,

I have a few seedlings of each of12 species of Calochortus: albus, amabilis, catalinae, dunnii, luteus, macrocarpus, plumerae, pulchellus, supurbus, tolmei, venustus, & weedii; that i got from a special PBS offering from leftovers from 3 past year's exchanges. a name was selected randomly from among those who expressed interest and my name was selected.

I got very good germination; but, most of the seedlings resented transplant from the refrigerator.
From very generous packets of most, I got 1 to 5 survivors of each specie. If they survive the gophers and the weather I hope to see blooms in 3=4 years.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

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Re: Calochortus 2023
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2023, 07:19:54 PM »


The first flowers of Calochortus luteus are now starting to open. The flower nectaries of each individual plant are different and unique. Our second generation of hybrid plants is progressing well and will be blooming in a season or two. It is hard to think that there could be improvements to this species, but one never knows unless they try. [Jasmin]:  Look carefully, see the tiny bee near the “noontime” position inside the flower.

We also grow Calochortus superbus. The range of Calochortus luteus and Calochortus superbus overlap in both the Sierra Nevada Foothills and the Inner Coast Range Mountains. Hybrids between the two species are common in the wild. In my opinion, the two species are quite attractive and the wild hybrids are interesting but not necessarily an improvement on the species. Despite my feelings I will be crossing the two species in our garden this season to see if they hybrids have any unforeseen qualities that I value.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Calochortus 2023
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2023, 05:01:27 PM »


This tub with Calochortus luteus is at its prime right now. A volunteer seedling of Triteleia hyacinthina is sharing space with the Calochortus.



On close inspection, there are subtle variations in the nectaries and other petal markings on each individual plant. We are currently working on our second generation of plants to ascertain useful horticultural variations within this species.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: Calochortus 2023
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2023, 06:15:25 PM »


Our best late blooming form of Calochortus superbus is now in bloom. This seed accession came from 2,343 feet (714 meters) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. This is very near the high elevation limit for this species in our region. This seed accession exhibited a great deal of genetic variability. Each seedling blooms during a different time period. The last seedlings to bloom can be 45 days later than the first seedlings.

In our region, the range of Calochortus superbus and Calochortus luteus often overlap. Although Calochortus luteus will easily cross with Calochortus superbus, this seed accession has not demonstrated any hybrid characteristics. In addition, Calochortus luteus grows at a much lower elevation, well below the elevation where this seed accession was obtained. It has been exciting watching this group of seedlings develop.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

 


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