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1
Cultivation Problems / Re: Pest Problem
« Last post by MarcR on Today at 01:06:00 AM »
Hi Arnold,

Thank you for taking the time to supply so much useful information. Squirrels are a huge problem in our Sacramento garden. I have read about how the Japanese use little netted bags to protect their ripening fruit. Where do you purchase the remay sacks? It is extremely frustrating to make hand pollinated crosses and have squirrels (mostly), raccoons, or birds run off with or destroy some of the crosses. Are there larger remay sacks that might be useful for large clusters of table grapes.

Robert,

You might try planting the material you want to cross in an enclosure of chain link fence with chain link over the top, and the bottom embeded in a poured concrete footing. It could be made more attractive by planting flowering vines on it.
2
Cultivation Problems / Re: Pest Problem
« Last post by Jeffnz on Today at 12:32:37 AM »
The demise of bees should be of huge to all no matter where..
Remember seeing a report of the need to hand pollinate commercial fruit trees growing in parts of China where bee populations had disappeared due to the use of toxic pesticides. Mites have also contributed to a reduction in the number of live bees in hives.
DIY bee keeping has become very popular here, mainly for a cheaper source of honey. Our Kiwifruit industry sources hives for flower pollination.  As long as there is an uncontaminated pollen source this practice may improve the potential for natural pollinators.
In NZ there has been a move to ban the use of systemic pesticides and fungicides by hone gardeners. The same does not apply to commercial growers of produce, the logic used to justify this is that home gardeners use garden chemicals in an indiscriminate and un controlled way. Cannot find any stats but I am sure that commercial use well out weighs DIY use. While there has been some restrictions placed on commercial users, they require their produce to be free of the possibility of disease transmission with export crops. We export huge quantities of apples to markets that place strict controls on  acceptance.
I knew a small commercial grower of paeonies as a flower export crop, mainly to the US.  They classed due to the requirements for their flowers to be accepted. Regular spraying was the base for acceptance.


3
Cultivation Problems / Re: Pest Problem
« Last post by Robert on June 29, 2022, 08:52:42 PM »
Hi Arnold,

Thank you for taking the time to supply so much useful information. Squirrels are a huge problem in our Sacramento garden. I have read about how the Japanese use little netted bags to protect their ripening fruit. Where do you purchase the remay sacks? It is extremely frustrating to make hand pollinated crosses and have squirrels (mostly), raccoons, or birds run off with or destroy some of the crosses. Are there larger remay sacks that might be useful for large clusters of table grapes. I use lettuce bags in my breeding work, but the material is not strong enough to keep squirrels out.

Cornell University is right in your backyard. As I remember they have conducted extensive field studies of apple rootstocks. Unfortunately they are more geared toward agri-business. U.C. Davis is 10 miles from our Sacramento home. They too are geared toward agri-business. They basically they know nothing of natural pest control. Organic has been subsumed by agri-business, so the advice is generally just as toxic and destructive as the chemical version.

A lack of chilling hours for fruit trees (some ornamental species too, such a lilac) as well as the disappearance of pollinators is becoming a huge problem in California, especially in the Central Valley and other areas of intense mega scale commercial agriculture. Almond growers are desperate for honeybees or any other pollinators they can find. Ground water over draft is so bad that in many Valley location the surface of the ground has dropped 30 feet, sometimes much more. In addition, the well water quality has declined so much that the water now contains high levels of salts. The food grown with this water, it is often cut with fresher water so the plants do not die, contain toxic levels of heavy metals such as arsenic, selenium, and other heavy metals. In the super market these foods are labeled with warnings. Crazy isn’t it! Don’t believe me? I will take a photograph of one of the labels.

I bought a Magness Pear from Arthur Wiebe, owner of Vallombrosa Gardens, Chico, California, back in the late 1970’s. Arthur died in 1983 and his amazing little nursery died with him. He grew all sorts of usual, heirloom, and rare fruits. I still have one of his ”Chinese Easter Cherries”. I have never been able to ID the plant to the species level. It is compatible with both Mazzard (Prunus avium) and Mahaleb (Prunus mahaleb) cherry rootstocks.
4
going by the foliage - delphinium tricorne?
5
Plant Identification Questions and Answers / Re: Hardly progressing
« Last post by Maggi Young on June 29, 2022, 02:19:40 PM »
In my ignorance, these plants are a mystery to me - but perhaps Sedum floriferum?
6
Please remember for me! :-[ JohnnyD
7
Plant Identification Questions and Answers / Re: Hardly progressing
« Last post by JohnnyD on June 29, 2022, 11:18:19 AM »
Does this help? JohnnyD
8
Ian Young's Bulb Log - Feedback Forum / Re: Bulb Log 2022
« Last post by Ian Y on June 29, 2022, 11:06:20 AM »
Relationships with and between plants, taking pictures of plants, spires, plants featured includes Dactylorhiza, Digitalis, Geranium,Potentilla among others.


https://www.srgc.net/documents/bulb%20logs/220629105846BULB%20LOG%202622.pdf
9
Cultivation Problems / Re: Pest Problem
« Last post by ArnoldT on June 29, 2022, 03:26:49 AM »
Robert

I've had the apples in my little suburban espalier garden in New Jersey for over 30 years.  Our greatest challenge is pollination.  We rarely see bees these days.  Our local County government decided that we needed the entire are sprayed for mosquitos so they drove a  truck up and down our streets spraying a very toxic   pesticide to anything that flies.

I get relative small fruit set these days.  Plenty of flowers.  This year the Caville Blanc set no fruit.  I purchased  the trees from a espalier tree dealer out at the end of Long Island.  He sells whips and some already trained trees.  I believe he may have Cox's Orange.  https://www.henryleuthardtnurseries.com/  He apparently is responsible for the pollarded London planes at the UN in NYC.

Our summers are hot and wet which may be to liking of the Cox's Orange. I've adopted a strict organic approach to pest control.

Use Spinosad, Neem and BT for most of the issues that come along.

There is a web site run by Cornell University that lets you know the pest stage so spraying has a maximum effect.  You plug in the nearest airport and it will give you degree days and stages of the pest and when to treat.
https://newa.cornell.edu/user


Second problem is that our local squirrels take fruit and runs off with it.  I have solved that problem with a remay sack I put over the fruit when it gets big enough.  There's even a twist tie on the top of the bag to allow easier fixation.

My real treasures are the pears.  I have a number of espalier Passe Crassane, Beurre Grifard and Magness.  The Magness was introduced in the 60's and does very well here.



10
Flowers and Foliage Now / Re: June 2022, Northern Hemisphere.
« Last post by Robert on June 28, 2022, 11:53:50 PM »
Many Lilium bulbs are quite good to eat, too.  I've tried the flower buds, buy much prefer Daylilies.  I am especially partial to the open flowers of Hemerocallis citrina, and the inferior ovary that looks like the flower stem is the best part!

This is my Lilium 'Louise'.
(Attachment Link)

It appears neither of us have the real deal, according to the RHS Lily Register
(Attachment Link)

Hi Rick,

Dahlia tubers are edible too. I have never eaten any. I will give them a try sometime. I generally have plenty of extra tubers in the autumn. I have eaten lily bulbs. I guess it is good to know that they are edible, however I was not impressed by the flavor. Daylilies are much better.  :)

All my Lilium 'Louise' are hybrids with Lilium henryi. They date back to the 1990's when I was doing a lot of lily breeding. I will have to see if I can find the records on these hybrids. Right now I have time to work with Oriental Lilies. My goal is to
'go backward' to create tough disease resistant plants that look much more like a wild species. Lilies for the cut flower trade is not my thing at all.
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