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Author Topic: Saxifraga fortunei  (Read 2471 times)

Diane Whitehead

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Saxifraga fortunei
« on: October 06, 2012, 04:38:55 AM »
I did a search and found only two mentions of Saxifraga fortunei since 2008.

If it flowered at the same time as the exquisite tinies of spring, I would understand
that fortunei would be ignored, but it is wonderful to have frothy white flowers to
accompany autumn gentians.

I saw photos of new European varieties a couple of years ago, but as they were not
available here in Canada, I was given seed by Russ Graham, a generous Oregon
nurseryman.

The plants were very slow growing, but by this year were almost cabbagy - and the
deer thought so too, so I won't show photos of the leaves, which varied in colour, surface
texture and shape.  Most of the plants are flowering now, though some still have tight buds,
so the flowering should last into November, and should be uneaten because I now have
a hoop of chicken wire over them.

The variation in flowers is interesting.  They are almost all white, but some have orange
stamens or yellow ovaries. A couple are pink.  Some have excessively long petals, and
notching varies too.  Some have chunky inflorescences, others have widely spaced
flowers, and one is very floriferous.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

David Stephens

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 10:10:49 AM »
Not much use to you Diane, but there is currently a trial of Saxifraga fortunei at the Royal Horticultural Society garden at Wisley, I was there yesterday judging. As you say, great variation in leaf and flower form.

Claire Cockcroft

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2012, 05:20:32 PM »
Several years ago, I was lucky to purchase a bulb pot that was donated to our NARGS chapter plant sale by the late Steve Doonan.  The bulbs are long since gone, but a seedling S. fortunei came up in the pot from Steve's garden.  The leaves are a very dark red, the flowers white.  I have tried to grow it in the garden but weevils love it and the mole runs under the plant to clean out the weevil larvae.  I've finally given up and put it in a pot.
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

David Nicholson

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2012, 09:53:35 AM »
They really are beautiful plants and put on a wonderful show.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

shelagh

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2012, 09:25:03 AM »
We have several different ones in the garden and they are just coming into flower, a wonderful spot of colour in the garden at this time of year.  Wouldn't be without them.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

"There's this idea that women my age should fade away. Bugger that." Baroness Trumpington

Tim Ingram

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2012, 04:12:10 PM »
A bit late Diane but this is a small form we inherited in a trough, along with autumn gentians. In the garden we have not had much luck with this plant because of summer dryness but I would certainly agree with Shelagh, it must be one of the best late flowering 'alpines' around and there are some wonderful dwarf forms.
Dr. Timothy John Ingram. Nurseryman & gardener with strong interest in plants of Mediterranean-type climates and dryland alpines. Garden in Kent, UK. www.coptonash.plus.com

WimB

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2012, 04:30:05 PM »
Wim Boens - Secretary VRV (Flemish Rock Garden Society) - Seed exchange manager Crocus Group
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Flemish Rock Garden society (VRV): http://www.vrvforum.be/
Facebook page VRV: http://www.facebook.com/pages/VRV-Vlaamse-Rotsplanten-Vereniging/351755598192270

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Saxifraga fortunei
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2012, 07:39:49 PM »
Black Ruby is wonderful - such intensity of colour,  in leaves and flower.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

 


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