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Author Topic: 2012 Site 2  (Read 3204 times)

fredg

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2012 Site 2
« on: June 15, 2012, 07:34:03 PM »
This site is Ophry apifera only.
A narrow strip of grass besides a main road belonging to an empty small factory.Took a trip over yesterday and it's far too early. I did spot about a dozen plants but only the one in flower so far.
The Dactylorhiza on Site 1 just down the road are slow this year too. I'll revisit in a couple of weeks.
Fred
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Maggi Young

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2012, 08:13:48 PM »
Fred, your great photos here- and in other threads, are showing me how variable the Ophrys apifera are.... so many little faces.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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fredg

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2012, 11:21:27 AM »
That's why I'd like to get to this very limited site at the optimum time Maggi.
I would like to record  the variation in markings of the small community, which is probably formed from the one genetic source, while the flowers are in prime condition
Already I have noticed three plants with their inflorecence broken off  :(
Fred
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fredg

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2012, 11:39:12 AM »
I returned to this site as promised.
I hope people aren't getting bored with photos of Ophrys apifera, there's just so many plants this year.
Fred
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Maggi Young

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2012, 12:11:29 PM »
I find these pictures to be a fascinating record of the subtle variations in the markings ofthese flowers.
And,  even though Peter H. points out elsewhere, these orchids can be locally plentiful, I think it is a good thing that we can all see and share in the pleasure of them - especially those of us without such treasures in our area. 
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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ronm

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2012, 12:29:58 PM »
I'm very much enjoying seeing them all Fred.  :o 8)
I hope you can continue to post pictures in this volume for years to come.

ronm

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2012, 12:57:01 PM »
Excuse my ignorance please Fred. In 22012e are the pale flowers just older, or are they truly paler versions of the 'norm'? How many plants are in this picture?

fredg

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2012, 01:04:08 PM »
There are two stems in that picture Ron, each of which has light (older) and dark flowers.
There are examples of this at the new site too. I'm not sure why it happens as other plants keep the darker flowers when old.

Fred
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ronm

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2012, 01:07:31 PM »
So each flower, even on the same plant, has individual markings? No two Ophyris apifera flowers are the same?

fredg

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2012, 01:17:33 PM »
Well, looking closely at my photographs, variations in markings do seem to appear on flowers of the same plant. However there are also examples where they don't appear to do so.

I'll sit firmly on the fence for now  ;)
Fred
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daveyp1970

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2012, 02:40:33 PM »
This happens when the flower is pollinated as soon as the pollen touches the stigmatic surface the flower starts to collapse and changes colour.Can i just say this bee orchid is wind pollinated for those that don't know.
tuxford
Nottinghamshire

ronm

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2012, 03:00:01 PM »
Well, looking closely at my photographs, variations in markings do seem to appear on flowers of the same plant. However there are also examples where they don't appear to do so.

I'll sit firmly on the fence for now  ;)

I've just been through every pic I can find on Google images ( it was either that or do some decorating! ;D ), and I cannot find one image where the flowers on the same plant are identical. Same goes for all pics I can find on here.

Thanks for pointing that out Davey. I guess I assumed it was insects. ::)  :-[

Tony Willis

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2012, 04:45:08 PM »
Fred

you seem to be having a good year visiting these various sites. Very nice to see them
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

fredg

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2012, 05:59:36 PM »
I'll have to disagree with wind pollination as Ophrys apifera self-pollinates.

In Ophrys apifera, the pollinia are held in a chamber at the tip of the anther column. At the base they are attached to the column by a long slender thread or caudicle. As the flower develops the pollinia drop out,  dangling on the caudicles, moving about in any slight breeze until they become attached to the sticky stigmatic surface at the base of the column.

1  Pollinium hanging on caudicle
2  Side view
3  Pollinia attached to the stigma, pollination occurs
Fred
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ronm

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Re: 2012 Site 2
« Reply #14 on: July 06, 2012, 06:03:57 PM »
Fascinating information Fred. 8)
Is this unique amongst the Genus Ophrys?
« Last Edit: July 06, 2012, 06:08:28 PM by ronm »

 


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