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Author Topic: Growing bulbs in hot climates  (Read 15451 times)

Rogan

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #45 on: November 22, 2007, 11:11:13 AM »
Now these are twisty leaves!

Photographed in the Hantam mountains of the Northern Cape province in September 2006 - a Moraea species I think?
Rogan Roth, near Swellendam, Western Cape, SA
Warm temperate climate - zone 10-ish

Carlo

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #46 on: November 22, 2007, 12:08:27 PM »
Well by the looks of the flowers, it doesn't look long until seed is ready!
Carlo A. Balistrieri
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The Garden Conservancy
Zone 6

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #47 on: November 22, 2007, 06:29:31 PM »
Fabulous leaves!
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Paul T

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #48 on: November 24, 2007, 05:26:38 AM »
Rogan,

You're right, those flower remains do look a bit iridaceae, but never heard of leaves like that on a Moraea.  Those leaves are absolutely to die for....... the great thing with those would be that you can grow it for those alone, with the flowers being a bonus.  I lvoe twisty and spiral leaves, but have never seen anything quite like that before.  I hope you manage to find out what it is, and eventually grow it.  Thanks for posting the picture of it for us to lust after!!  ;D
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Michael

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #49 on: November 25, 2007, 03:27:37 PM »
Paul you took out the words of my mouth!

Rogan, is that plant abundant on it's natural range?
"F" for Fritillaria, that's good enough to me ;)
Mike

Portugal, Madeira Island

Rogan

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #50 on: November 28, 2007, 07:40:36 AM »
Paul you took out the words of my mouth!

Rogan, is that plant abundant on it's natural range?

I was in a hurry and only saw the one plant.

Graham Duncan, a horticulturist at Kirstenbosch, Cape Town has identified it as Moraea (used to be Gynandriris) pritzeliana. It has been mentioned (PBS I think) that the leaves often don't curl in cultivation.
Rogan Roth, near Swellendam, Western Cape, SA
Warm temperate climate - zone 10-ish

Paul T

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #51 on: November 28, 2007, 12:29:39 PM »
Gee, pritzeliana doesn't even attempt to curl for me...... just look like normal Moraea leaves.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

SueG

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #52 on: November 28, 2007, 03:17:19 PM »
They are amazing leaves - look a bit like the ribbon spirals that posh shops use to decorate gift boxes
Sue
Sue Gill, Northumberland, UK

Ezeiza

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Re: Growing bulbs in hot climates
« Reply #53 on: January 23, 2008, 12:09:27 AM »
Hi:

     Grown in gritty mix in full sun even tiny seedlings of Moraea (Gynandriris) curl up in the upper half but that effect of the whole leaf like a spring must be under extreme desert conditions.

Regards
Alberto Castillo, in south America, near buenos Aires, Argentina.

 


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