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Author Topic: Early December 2006  (Read 23667 times)

Lesley Cox

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #45 on: December 27, 2006, 01:45:52 AM »
I'm currently collecting seed from my Cyclamen coum Pewter Group. Let me know privately if anyone would like some. (Also send postal address.) They come true and my form is a lovely pink with a deeper, picotee edge. Seed is VERY fresh.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Tim Murphy

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Re: Early, now very late, December 2006
« Reply #46 on: December 27, 2006, 08:37:58 AM »
Joakim, the 'Pewter Group' is a collective name given to a group of plants (Cyclamen coum) which should share similar features. Historically, it was produced by crossing two different examples of C. coum to produce plants which would then go on to become the Pewter Group. The pewter leaves often have a narrow green band which is sometimes faint or can be more strongly marked and the flowers are often darker than those of 'normal' coum. The problem with groups like this is that most of the plants carrying the name almost certainly don't derive from that original cross, so the variability within the group is immense and will only get worse (or better from the point of a collector of variable plants). Effectively, I could select out seedlings from my own random plants which loosely fit the description of the Pewter Group and label them as such. Of course, it would be much worse of these plants had a cultivar name... which 'Pewter Group isn't, thankfully. Seed from these plants should still be labelled as ex. Pewter Group though.

You are right about your cyclamen seedlings, Joakim. The cotyledon is usually plain. In some species, cyprium for example, it is always plain, even if the plant then goes on to produce the most fantastic silvery leaves. In contrast, some seedlings from silver leaved forms of hederifolium will have silver cotyledons, and I ALWAYS keep these until they are mature. The second and third leaves will start to look more like the mature leaves, and those following will give you even more of an idea of what the mature leaves will look like, but to be sure, it is worth keeping the plant until it has gone dormant. When the plant starts growth again, then you will see its true potential. I never sell cyclamen seedlings!

« Last Edit: December 27, 2006, 11:44:43 AM by Maggi Young »

Joakim B

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #47 on: December 27, 2006, 09:12:15 AM »
Lesley thanks for the generous offer and Tim thanks for the info.
I learn a lot and I think more people did that too.

kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

Paddy Tobin

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Re: Early, now very late, December 2006
« Reply #48 on: December 27, 2006, 10:11:27 AM »
Joakim,

As Tim pointed out the term 'pewter group' has become rather loosely applied to Cyclamen coum plants with a particular leaf colouring and pattern but, over time, the boundaries of what exactly fits into this group has become clouded and so it is with mine. They are very like the pewter group but, to be honest, I couldn't say for sure they are exactly as pewter group plants should be. They make a nice show when grouped together.

Joakim, I'm sure there will be many smaller plants of these, my 'pewter group' cyclamen coum in the garden, self-sown seedlings. If you would like me to post some on to you please let me know. Tim will might comment on how advisable it would be to move them now or if it would be better to wait. Tim?

Paddy
« Last Edit: December 27, 2006, 11:44:08 AM by Maggi Young »
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

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Tim Murphy

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #49 on: December 27, 2006, 04:16:18 PM »
Hello Paddy. If these seedlings are from this year and have only the cotyledon, the tubers will be quite delicate (it will still resemble a small, elongated pearl) and I think that these would be difficult to move. Posting within the UK would probably be OK as you could ship them with a decent amount of soil around the tubers for a relatively low cost and the time spent in the post would be minimal too, so most of the plants would survive.

Shipping abroad presents a few more problems as the young plants could spend a bit longer in the post and retaining soil around the tubers is a no-no as regional authorities generally bin anything that comes in with soil attached - if they find it!! You could ship the tubers in wet (but not wringing wet) kitchen paper - just add extra plants to account for losses.

If the plants are a little older (a year or more), it's much easier. They can be shipped at anytime of the year generally. I ship plants in full growth and the only downside to it is that the recipient has a plant, or plants which have leaves and flowers flailing around all over the place when they are planted out because they've been taken out of their pots. Even that can be sorted out if the plants are going to be potted up and one has the time to pin leaf stalks into place with one hand whilst setting in place with the other hand filled with grit.


Paddy Tobin

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #50 on: December 27, 2006, 04:23:20 PM »
Tim,

Many thanks for your information, very comprehensive. Joakim is in Sweden but I don't mind trying to send them to him. If the plants fail he will be none the worse off. They are self-sown seedlings here into their second or third year.

Paddy
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #51 on: December 28, 2006, 01:01:52 AM »
Mine came originally as a handful of seedlings, very tiny, given to me by Joy Bishop in England in 1993. They were bare-rooted and taken to the other end of the world in the UK mid summer, with no ill effects, and acclimatized (turned around their seasons) nicely and fast. They were given simply as Cyclamen coum Pewter Group and have produced about a dozen generations of seedlings, every one true to the originals.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Joakim B

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #52 on: December 28, 2006, 01:12:02 AM »
Lesley plants can be amazing when they want to canīt they?
Nice to hear that they are seed proof.

Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

Paddy Tobin

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #53 on: December 28, 2006, 09:28:06 PM »
A few things from a walk around the garden today - holidays are great; they give us the time to idle about and take life easy.  The Anemone pavonina is a bit early in the season but the last few days have been mild here and it may have come on as a result. Arum italicum 'Marmoratum' seeds itself about freely and is a good foliage plant at this time of year. Narcissus romieuxii is growing outdoors and it looking well at the moment but is very prone to damage from bad weather. Libertian perigrinans is good for winter colour in the garden, a good bronze patch amid the general gloom.

Paddy

« Last Edit: December 28, 2006, 09:30:10 PM by Paddy Tobin »
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

https://anirishgardener.wordpress.com/

hadacekf

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #54 on: December 29, 2006, 04:30:52 PM »

Hi everyone, for those interested I have put some photos of my bulb meadow in winter. Since we have this winter no snow I see growing the leaves of my bulbs.
Crocus-goulimyi
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

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http://www.franz-alpines.org

Andrew

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #55 on: December 29, 2006, 04:35:50 PM »
A few things from a walk around the garden today - holidays are great.

Holidays ?? Speak for yourself Paddy.  :D

I was up at 4 o'clock this morning (and Wednesday and Thursday) to go to work, as I am sure other people were as well (prehaps not so early, anybody ?) :) :)

Andrew
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mark smyth

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #56 on: December 29, 2006, 05:32:16 PM »
Me too Andrew. I only had Christmas day off.

Paddy how does you Anenome like outside? I have 4 pots of them that could go out.
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
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All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Paddy Tobin

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #57 on: December 29, 2006, 10:46:01 PM »
Ah Andrew,

My heart breaks for you with your 4a.m. rise. That would kill me. I closed for holidays on Friday 22nd and will return on Monday 7th January. It's a horribly easy job but someone's got to do it!

Mark, that anemone is outside for the last two winters and has done fine. The flower in the photograph is the only one on the plant at the moment but it performs better later on in the year.

Paddy
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

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Joakim B

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #58 on: December 29, 2006, 10:56:53 PM »
I am with Paddy on this one!!
Enjoying the hollidays and planting orange and olive trees.
My son is an Oliveira so he need an Olive tree. He got one extra on his birthday. Then I think it is a funny Christmas tradition to plant orange tree so we did that to.
I stay up reading the forum to 2am does that count as work? Else I enjoy the hollidays.

Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

Maggi Young

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Re: Early December 2006
« Reply #59 on: December 29, 2006, 11:02:33 PM »
Young Oliveira Balogh will have a fine orchard when he is grown, with many olive trees and oranges.. what better gift to give the lad? The scent of an orange grove in flower has to be one of the finest fragrances in the world and is one of my most favourite.
Now I'm off to bed early for a change.. all this cake has made me tired!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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