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Author Topic: NZ Field trips - October  (Read 2378 times)

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field trips - October
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2011, 07:47:35 PM »
Hi Stephen.

I wes a little casual in my naming of the Apium. The New Zealand plant is known as  Apium prostratum subsp. prostratum var. filiforme> so the short answer to your question is that there is no difference. The same variety occurs in Eastern Australia so var prostratum may occur there as well. I do not know. There is a second New Zealand subspecies Apium prostratum subsp. denticulatum that occurs on the Chatham and Antipodes Islands.

As for Lepidium oleraceumthere is a small possibility that I could obtain some seed from my DOC contacts but this may be difficult as it is a protected plant.

Cliff,

I was going to apologise to you as I did not show any pictures of buttercups in my posting but then realised that Myosurus is a buttercup. Does it satisfy your Ranuculophilia?
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field trips - October
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2011, 08:04:39 PM »
Barely, David, barely!  LOL.
I must admit I've never encountered it before.   :D
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Anthony Darby

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Re: NZ Field trips - October
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2011, 08:38:56 PM »
Amazing plants.
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
"Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution"
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Stephenb

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Re: NZ Field trips - October
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2011, 08:09:28 AM »
Hi Stephen.

I wes a little casual in my naming of the Apium. The New Zealand plant is known as  Apium prostratum subsp. prostratum var. filiforme> so the short answer to your question is that there is no difference. The same variety occurs in Eastern Australia so var prostratum may occur there as well. I do not know. There is a second New Zealand subspecies Apium prostratum subsp. denticulatum that occurs on the Chatham and Antipodes Islands.

As for Lepidium oleraceumthere is a small possibility that I could obtain some seed from my DOC contacts but this may be difficult as it is a protected plant.

Thanks! I have a slide of a similar plant growing on a rocky shoreline on South Island under the name filiforme...

Didn't realise that oleraceum was now protected! I read in Crowe's book on edible plants of New Zealand that it was declining due to decreases in grazing pressure...
Stephen
Malvik, Norway
Eating my way through the world's 15,000+ edible species
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Hoy

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Re: NZ Field trips - October
« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2011, 08:12:27 AM »
I have to echo Anthony: Amazing plants!. For example the Myosurus (M. minimus) that grows here is an annual and quite different.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

 


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