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Author Topic: Asteranthera ovata outdoors  (Read 12912 times)

Lesley Cox

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #30 on: August 11, 2011, 09:47:41 PM »
Thanks Dave, that's just what I wanted to know. If I wait a little longer they'll fall off and open to reveal the seeds.

I've not seen seed on the exchange lists before so wondered if seed was a rare occurrance. Perhaps not all clones seed readily but of course my two plants were cutting grown, from yours. They took a heck of a time to root and a few cuttings I took back in Oct last year are only now rooted for sure.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Lesley Cox

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #31 on: August 11, 2011, 09:52:13 PM »
Actually, thry're rather like Trillium berries in the way they fall and open. No wonder they do well for you Dave. Maybe there's hope for me yet :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Lesley Cox

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2011, 12:53:58 AM »
Well today I took the first of the fruit mainly because it was looking a bit sad after snow and rain. It has seed in a sort of slightly sticky jelly and this is strongly and sweetly scented. I suspect that if left to its own devices, the seed pods may be eaten or even carted away by ants or other creepies which like the sweet sticky surrounds of Trillium and Cyclamen seeds so I'm pleased I've got it in time. Now to clean it and dry it enough for transport by envelope. Maybe I'll wash it in lukewarm water in a smal bowl and dry it on paper towels. So please to have some "in the bag" as it were.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2011, 11:31:40 AM »
Best to label the paper towels very clearly, Lesley!  ::) ;)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #34 on: August 20, 2011, 11:15:00 PM »
I did do Maggi. "This is seed of Asteranthera ovata. DO NOT THROW IT OUT! Or DIE!"
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Michael J Campbell

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #35 on: May 01, 2012, 05:10:06 PM »

Quote
If you were here Graham, I'd suggest a punga (tree fern trunk) which can be bought in good condition at garden centres or found in the bush in a getting-towards-rotting state and should be perfect for an asteranthera. Philesias love them too

I have just taken Lesley's advice and rescued a trunk of Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan palm) that was dumped in the Forrest, (couldn't find a Tree Fern) and planted it in a shady spot in  the back garden. At the base on  one side  I have planted a Asteranthera ovata and on the other side a Philesia magellanica, what are my chances of success?

Trachycarpus fortunei trunk.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2012, 06:00:58 PM by Michael J Campbell »

Lesley Cox

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #36 on: May 01, 2012, 08:58:38 PM »
I'd say they were pretty good Michael. Cool and damp and shady for both plants and they should flourish.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #37 on: August 17, 2013, 11:44:02 AM »
I have just taken Lesley's advice and rescued a trunk of Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan palm) that was dumped in the Forrest, (couldn't find a Tree Fern) and planted it in a shady spot in  the back garden. At the base on  one side  I have planted a Asteranthera ovata and on the other side a Philesia magellanica, what are my chances of success?

Trachycarpus fortunei trunk.


How are your plants doing, Michael?

 I found a  photo online  of Asteranthera ( labelled Philesia!!)  happily growing up a tree trunk in Chile which  give a good idea as to how it likes to live - no wonder it is tricky we can have so much difficulty with it  ;)



Photo details from http://www.forestryimages.org

Description: Growing on stem of Nothofagus dombeyi, Parque nacional Vincente Perez Rosales, X Region, Chile
Image type: Field
 Chile
Photographer Information
Name: William M. Ciesla
Organization: Forest Health Management International

Edit: later found same  photo properly labelled!http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5175060#sthash.4lDCiwhO.dpuf
« Last Edit: August 19, 2013, 11:01:51 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Hoy

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #38 on: August 17, 2013, 11:51:32 AM »
I have just taken Lesley's advice and rescued a trunk of Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan palm) that was dumped in the Forrest, (couldn't find a Tree Fern) and planted it in a shady spot in  the back garden. At the base on  one side  I have planted a Asteranthera ovata and on the other side a Philesia magellanica, what are my chances of success?

Trachycarpus fortunei trunk.

Michael, I too think you will have a very good chance of success. I have tried both species twice and they have thrived but are then killed in a bad winter. Your climate is much better than mine.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Michael J Campbell

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #39 on: August 17, 2013, 02:04:07 PM »
Quote
How are your plants doing, Michael?
     DEAD.  :-[

I have some rooted cuttings and will try again.

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #40 on: August 17, 2013, 02:06:28 PM »
Oh dear- bad news.  Was it the warmer weather that  killed them, do you think?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #41 on: August 19, 2013, 11:56:47 AM »
That's sad Michael. I hope you can let us know WHY they died. The position sounded ideal.

With some trepidation I have planted my Asteranthera in the great outdoors, back in April just before I went on holiday and I arranged 4 clay pots upside-down around it, with a polystyrene tray sat on them, it held down by a large and heavy clay pot, all as frost protection as I'd previously had it only in my tunnel before we moved. There has been no damage, not only while I was away but also since I came home when we've had harder frosts. Then I remembered that Graham was growing it outdoors in Edinburgh and I saw it thriving outdoors at Angie's place near Aberdeen so thought I was probably silly to worry about whatever frost we may have. So far it's doing OK though not much new growth at this end-of-winter time but I really hope it flowers and then seeds outside as I still have to get some seed to Russia and a couple of other places.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Michael J Campbell

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #42 on: August 19, 2013, 12:48:30 PM »
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That's sad Michael. I hope you can let us know WHY they died. The position sounded ideal.

I spotted a few greenfly on it and sprayed it with a soap based environmentally friendly bug killer. DEAD IN A FEW DAYS.

Maggi Young

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #43 on: August 19, 2013, 01:09:57 PM »
Soap will kill Shortia flowers in double quick time - I mention this to flag up the need for caution with even the more innocuous treatments.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Graham Catlow

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Re: Asteranthera ovata outdoors
« Reply #44 on: August 19, 2013, 07:18:48 PM »
I found an old weathers piece of tree back in 2011 when we first started this thread and guided a couple of runners towards it. It has been slow but is now doing what I hoped it would. Looking forward to flowers up the trunk in the future.
I've never looked for seed but it must be quite a job as the flowers on mine are almost buried in the leaves. I might mark some of the flowers and see what is produced in a few weeks time.

Graham

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