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Author Topic: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 19830 times)

Ezeiza

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #60 on: December 16, 2010, 08:44:37 PM »
Yes, Maggi, sorry for the mess. The Oxalis perdicaria 'Citrina' (this should be the right spelling although 'Lactea' is more adequate) I was referring to.

Lesley the oxalis in the picture is a perdicaria form (year round rainfall even when it is dormant in summer). Oxalis lobata is a even smaller species from Chile that demands a Mediterranean cycle cultivation. Both are supposed to be the same species now but their cultivation requirements are really different.
Alberto Castillo, in south America, near buenos Aires, Argentina.

Tecophilaea King

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #61 on: December 16, 2010, 09:21:20 PM »
Stunning fuchsias Bill. Do you have names for any of them? I'd particularly like to ID the fourth last picture (2893), so elegant and pagoda-like.

Lesley, I try to find out if possible, but labels in public gardens always seem to get lost or misplaced, perhaps one of our keen, knowledgeable (fuchsia) growers on the forum might be able to ID it.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Paul T

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #62 on: December 16, 2010, 10:38:16 PM »
Oh I do like that Neomarica. I suppose that having any success with them in the UK is out of the question?

David,

If I can grow it outside here without too major cover (i.e near the house) then you should be able to I would think.  They don't require lots of sun, so that should help you.  ;D
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

David Nicholson

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #63 on: December 17, 2010, 09:56:18 AM »
Thanks Paul. Just noticed there was discussion a little earlier on Neomarica which I shall go and read now.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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annew

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #64 on: December 17, 2010, 08:18:18 PM »
Re the Oxalis - My stock appeared to sport in a pot of the yellow form I'd had for some years, but I was told it should be given the cultivar name 'Cetrino" (spelled like that) - there was an article in a recent AGS bulletin about it when it was given an award at one of the shows. I just used to call it "pale form'. Where did you find yours, Alberto?
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

www.dryad-home.co.uk

annew

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #65 on: December 17, 2010, 08:19:54 PM »
By the way, mine is treated as are my narcissus and completely dried out in the summer, so maybe they are a different species?
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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Lesley Cox

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #66 on: December 18, 2010, 09:11:58 PM »
I received en email from Australia this morning to say the fuchsia we liked Anne, is probably called 'Checkerboard.' We have a couple of fuchsia nurseries in NZ so I'll try to locate it.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

galahad

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #67 on: December 18, 2010, 09:41:35 PM »
I received en email from Australia this morning to say the fuchsia we liked Anne, is probably called 'Checkerboard.' We have a couple of fuchsia nurseries in NZ so I'll try to locate it.

It should be readily available Lesley.  It is an old and popular variety.  I may still have a plant in the garden somewhere
Christchurch, New Zealand

Otto Fauser

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #68 on: December 20, 2010, 05:39:00 AM »
The difficult to flower (in my experience) Tasmanian alpine plant Isophysis tasmanica surprised me with 2 flowers last week -but the snails got to it before my camera did .

Collector of rare bulbs & alpines, east of Melbourne, 500m alt, temperate rain forest.

Otto Fauser

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #69 on: December 20, 2010, 05:43:39 AM »
and a few early flowering lilies in my garden at the moment
Collector of rare bulbs & alpines, east of Melbourne, 500m alt, temperate rain forest.

Lesley Cox

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #70 on: December 20, 2010, 07:46:30 AM »
Lovely lilies Otto. I especially like L. ledebourii. :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

fermi de Sousa

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #71 on: December 20, 2010, 07:56:00 AM »
Cynthia went to the plant sale in Tassie in October and bought this Haemanthus humilis hirsutus for me from Marcus Harvey, I was very pleased to see it flower so soon!
257991-0

257993-1

Alstroemeria hookeri is in flower again in the Rock garden (maybe this year it'll set seed for someone I promised last year!)
257995-2

257997-3

And Habranthus robustus "Russell Manning" produced some early blooms thanks to the recent rain,
257999-4

258001-5
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Ezeiza

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #72 on: December 20, 2010, 04:59:09 PM »
Anne, the cream colored O. perdicaria was a single plant I found in a vacant lt here, Ezeiza, in the Buenos Aires region, at least 20 years ago. It was sent to Brian Mathew and Maurice Bussard among others and from them, the world. It used to offset well.
Alberto Castillo, in south America, near buenos Aires, Argentina.

Tecophilaea King

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #73 on: December 20, 2010, 07:35:44 PM »
The rare Karoo lily, Ammocharis coranica is a handsome South African bulb found over a wide range from the Karoo into the Eastern Cape. The wide, blue-green leaves stay fairly close to the ground, while the showy umbel of reddish-pink flowers is displayed on a sturdy stem.
Requires sun and wel-drained condition, and delighted to see it flowering  for the first time after 8 years grown in container.

The Veld lily, Crinum lugardiae is another rare species from South Africa to Botswana, and small compared to other Crinum.
The short leaves form a rosette almost flattened on the ground and the flower stalks are short too, no more than 30cm tall.
Flowers open at late afternoon and are very scented.
The flowers in bud have a nice reddish stripe outside, which almost disappears as the flowers open, the interiors are pure white.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Ezeiza

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #74 on: December 20, 2010, 08:28:04 PM »
Ammcharis coranica demand copious watering while in growth and it can easily flower twice in the same spring under this regime.
Alberto Castillo, in south America, near buenos Aires, Argentina.

 


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