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Author Topic: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 19793 times)

fermi de Sousa

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #45 on: December 13, 2010, 11:40:05 PM »
O. perdicaria is, of course, the new (old, correct) name for O. lobata so probably someone like Marcus could bring it south if he can locate a bulb or two.

You know the Brits Alberto. If it's put in a show and maybe up for an award, it has to have a cultivar name. even if it's a totally wild plant with no cultivated origins.
Unfortunately, although the type species (Oxalis perdicaria/lobata) is already in the country it's not on ICON so not even Marcus can import it into Australia! The State of New South Wales has actually banned ALL oxalis - even our own native species!! - so it is illegal to trade/sell any oxalis in that state. Most likely because of pest species such as O. pes-caprae which put all the genus in a bad light!
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Paul T

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2010, 11:48:05 PM »
The Neomarica is a gorgeous thing Rogan. I'm not sure that it's quite hardy here though. Pity. :'(

Lesley,

I grow Neomarica caerulea here, just near by front door where it gets some shelter from the worst of the cold.  It probably doesn't actually get "frost", but not much warmer than that.  Mine came from seed that came from Bill in NZ (via the ABA if memory serves me correctly?), so perhaps he might have a spare plant or two?  It flowered for the first time for me last year and it is just amazing.  Flowers are larger and more substantial than N. northiana.  I also theoretically have a yellow species, which is in bud and I am awaiting the first flowers opening to confirm what colour it is.  It was given to me by a friend here in Canberra, so hopefully it is correct.  8)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Rogan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #47 on: December 14, 2010, 08:14:00 AM »
Re. Neomarica caerulea: my seed originally came from the environs of Wellington, N.Z. - it now seeds itself slowly and harmlessly and is quite variable in a subtle flower-colour way. It is a great plant to have and the grey-green foliage is quite attractive too - it seems to appreciate a semi-shaded spot in the garden.

While on the subject of blue - I have a curious South American Utricularia species (Bladderwort - U. nelumbifolia), that colonises the watertanks of certain large Bromeliad species in its natural habitat. I grew my plant from seed years ago and as is the case with so many of my plants, I only notice it  once a year when it flowers - the rest of the time nature is allowed to take its course... The flowers are quite large (for a Bladderwort) and produced at the apex of an extremely long, thin stalk which pops up here and there in odd places. It also has the interesting habit of producing long, probing shoots which colonise any suitable container of water, such as drip trays, nearby bromeliads, or anything else within reach - a cool plant indeed   :D
« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 08:22:50 AM by Rogan »
Rogan Roth, near Swellendam, Western Cape, SA
Warm temperate climate - zone 10-ish

Paul T

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #48 on: December 14, 2010, 10:20:34 AM »
Rogan,

I have a little yellow species in any of my water features that don't have fish in them.  Makes for no mosquitoes.  ;D  I do rather like your little purple one.  Very nice.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Lesley Cox

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #49 on: December 14, 2010, 06:59:08 PM »
Love the Utricularia Rogan. We have a pretty native one, U. monanthos which is very tiny and bright purple. A real cutie but it needs constant water. It should be happy in similar conditions to Pinguiculas.

Tough about the Oxalis Fermi. Our permitted list includes 49 species at present which can be imported as seed and most of those as bulbs though some require assessment. We are even allowed to bring in pes-caprae, though who would want to? What was the magnificent species I saw along the highways on the way to your place? Great clumps of bright yellow?
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

cohan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #50 on: December 16, 2010, 02:12:57 AM »

While on the subject of blue - I have a curious South American Utricularia species (Bladderwort - U. nelumbifolia), that colonises the watertanks of certain large Bromeliad species in its natural habitat. I grew my plant from seed years ago and as is the case with so many of my plants, I only notice it  once a year when it flowers - the rest of the time nature is allowed to take its course... The flowers are quite large (for a Bladderwort) and produced at the apex of an extremely long, thin stalk which pops up here and there in odd places. It also has the interesting habit of producing long, probing shoots which colonise any suitable container of water, such as drip trays, nearby bromeliads, or anything else within reach - a cool plant indeed   :D

cool one for sure!, we have a basic native yellow...
so how large is this plant? does it make seed?

Tecophilaea King

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #51 on: December 16, 2010, 12:20:16 PM »
It's that time of the season again, when the colorful, beautiful fuchsia's in our local Te Puna Quarry Gardens putting up yet another dazzling display.
That should brighten up some of our Northern Hemisphere friends who are experiencing some adverse weather, with frost and snow just before Xmas.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

angie

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #52 on: December 16, 2010, 12:50:47 PM »
Bill thanks you have brightened my day.
Lots of snow and freezing weather now. I think I won't have much fuchsia's survive this winter.
Keep the pictures coming.

Angie  :)
Angie T.
....just outside Aberdeen in North East Scotland

Tecophilaea King

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #53 on: December 16, 2010, 01:12:52 PM »
Neomarica caerulea somehow manages to coordinate its blooming cycle and then does nothing for a few more weeks before the next show - amazing  :D

Yes, Neomarica caerulea is flowering here as well. :) :)
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

TheOnionMan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #54 on: December 16, 2010, 03:36:44 PM »
What a treat Bill!  Beautiful fuchsias :o, nice to see them growing like shrubs in the ground as opposed to hanging basket plants, the only way we see them here.
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
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WimB

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #55 on: December 16, 2010, 07:09:18 PM »
Bill, thanks for showing those pics of fuchsia's. They are wonderful and they brightened up my day for sure.
Wim Boens - Secretary VRV (Flemish Rock Garden Society) - Seed exchange manager Crocus Group
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Tecophilaea King

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #56 on: December 16, 2010, 08:04:29 PM »
Just a few more closeup pictures of the beautiful fuchsia's, tell me when you get sick of them.
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

Lesley Cox

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #57 on: December 16, 2010, 08:08:54 PM »
Stunning fuchsias Bill. Do you have names for any of them? I'd particularly like to ID the fourth last picture (2893), so elegant and pagoda-like.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

annew

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #58 on: December 16, 2010, 08:18:17 PM »
I like that one too. My 'hardy' fuchsias are looking terrible, but I'm hoping they will sprout from the base, as they did last year.
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David Nicholson

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #59 on: December 16, 2010, 08:29:03 PM »
Oh I do like that Neomarica. I suppose that having any success with them in the UK is out of the question?
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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