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Author Topic: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 19742 times)

cohan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2010, 04:13:36 AM »
Thanks Cohan, the rose is lovely. They're great here this year too, we've had wet and warm for quite a long time and they're loving it. I am almost tempted to try some myself. ::)

glad you liked it lesley :) roses are pretty easy here, assuming they are hardy, which plenty are, we don't really have any issue with summer heat...lol

fermi de Sousa

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2010, 07:04:35 AM »
Lesley,
I hope you'll be feeling better visiting the Forum and seeing pics and messages from your friends here. And of course you'll have received Marcus Harvey's latest catalogue! ;D I'm sure that will help! (If anyone else wants a copy electronicaly please send me a PM with your e-mail address)
Here are a few things that flowered before we went away in November that I feel still warrant a showing!
This is the first flowering on Amsonia jonesii which came form a Seedex (?NARGS) in 2004 and has finally seen fit to bloom, but sadly no seed set!
256630-0

256632-1

This is a volunteer seedling from the lovely duck-egg blue Ixia "Teal" but who was the father?! Quite a different colour to its seed parent.
256634-2

This is a seedling Helianthemum which came up when a large sprawling plant of "Ben Fhada" died last summer.
256636-3

A bright clump of Triteleia ixioides
256638-4

A rather striking mix of Sprekelia and our native Dampiera rosmarinifolius
256640-5

and finally Clematis integrifolia
256642-6

cheers
fermi
« Last Edit: December 08, 2010, 07:07:00 AM by fermides »
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Maggi Young

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2010, 11:25:37 AM »
Folks, the posts about how to achieve notifications for new posts to the Forum etc. have been moved  here :
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=6335.0

Remember that there is a lot of info in the HELP section of the forum accessed via the HELP button, second left in the row of options near the top of each forum page.

Each forumist has considerable freedom to change for themselves the way the forum operates  by making changes to their PROFILE, accessed by the button fourth left in that row of buttons.  ;)
« Last Edit: December 08, 2010, 12:43:11 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Tecophilaea King

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: December 08, 2010, 12:11:03 PM »
Bloomeria crocea, aka Golden Stars,a small genus of bulbous perennial herbs of southwestern United States and Mexico with beautiful clusters of bright yellow star-shaped flowers
The Sisyrinchium angustifolia belonging to the iris family, with grass-like foliage and violet-blue flowers, the Blue Eyed Grass wildflower is ideal for naturalizing ground cover in all types of gardens.

BTW: received an early Christmas present from our friend t00lie down south in Invercargill. Thanks Dave, I owe you one, or two...  :) :)

« Last Edit: December 08, 2010, 07:58:55 PM by Tecophilaea King »
Bill Dijk in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand
Climate zone 10

TheOnionMan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: December 08, 2010, 04:38:46 PM »
Bill, both are beautifully grown, nice to see familiar north americans on the other side of the world. Your Bloomeria looks particularly densely flowered; one of my favorite bulbs.   
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com

John Kitt

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2010, 09:05:16 AM »
I have just come across this web site on Tasmanian Ground Orchids with images so impressive I had to share it.
It probably doesn't fit in this thread so I hope Maggi will place it appropriately if necessary

http://www.upclose.net.au

Michael J Campbell

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: December 12, 2010, 12:19:27 PM »
In flower a few weeks ago before the big freeze.
Oxalis perdicaria cetrino
Oxalis hirta x 2

Maggi Young

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: December 12, 2010, 02:47:03 PM »
Michael: the creamy Oxalis is charming.

John: great link.... I've repeated it in the  Australian Terrestrial Orchid thread.  8)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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TheOnionMan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: December 12, 2010, 03:54:21 PM »
Michael: the creamy Oxalis is charming.

John: great link.... I've repeated it in the  Australian Terrestrial Orchid thread.  8)

I heartily agree on both accounts. We're in for a solid week of rain & snow, so it'll be good to curl up with an outstanding AU Terrestrial Orchid site.
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com

fermi de Sousa

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2010, 11:57:08 PM »
Michael,
that is an amazing Oxalis perdicaria! :o I wish it were available here in the Southern Hemisphere. The O. hirta looks like the form called "Rosea".

This is an Aristea species imported many years ago by Ken Gillandere in Tasmania; I bought it as either Aristea species #1 or #2! This year probably because of the extra rainfall it has made a stunning display.
257206-0
If anyone wants seed of it please let me know before I dead-head it all! If you can identify the species it would be even better! ;D

257208-1

First flowering on Calochortus argillosus from NARGS seedex 2008.
257210-2

Erodium glandulosum "Spanish Eyes"
257212-3

cheers
fermi
« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 02:31:08 PM by Maggi Young »
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Ezeiza

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: December 13, 2010, 01:30:39 AM »
Fermi, it comes from our Hemisphere! All the stock comes from a single bulb I found many years ago.

I wonder who gave it a name?
Alberto Castillo, in south America, near buenos Aires, Argentina.

Rogan

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: December 13, 2010, 12:09:21 PM »
The Irids are having a wild time in the garden at present: yesterday it seemed as though a host of bright blue butterflies were frolicking in the foliage! Neomarica caerulea somehow manages to coordinate its blooming cycle and then does nothing for a few more weeks before the next show - amazing  :D
Rogan Roth, near Swellendam, Western Cape, SA
Warm temperate climate - zone 10-ish

Lesley Cox

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #42 on: December 13, 2010, 09:02:54 PM »
O. perdicaria is, of course, the new (old, correct) name for O. lobata so probably someone like Marcus could bring it south if he can locate a bulb or two.

You know the Brits Alberto. If it's put in a show and maybe up for an award, it has to have a cultivar name. even if it's a totally wild plant with no cultivated origins.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Lesley Cox

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #43 on: December 13, 2010, 09:03:59 PM »
The Neomarica is a gorgeous thing Rogan. I'm not sure that it's quite hardy here though. Pity. :'(
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: December 2010 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #44 on: December 13, 2010, 10:21:02 PM »
Fermi, it comes from our Hemisphere! All the stock comes from a single bulb I found many years ago.

I wonder who gave it a name?

 Alberto, I'm not clear which plant you mean... are you referring to the Oxalis perdicaria cetrino ?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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