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Author Topic: Lycoris aurea  (Read 1667 times)

Alessandro.marinello

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Lycoris aurea
« on: September 17, 2010, 11:57:47 AM »
I have bought this like Lycoris aurea from China, but from the color me it does not seem to be Lycoris aurea, someone could identify?
Padova N-E Italy climate zone 8

Maggi Young

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Re: Lycoris aurea
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2010, 10:56:37 PM »
No idea! It is much more slender and "feathery" than L. albiflora, isn't it?
« Last Edit: September 19, 2010, 08:11:33 AM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Hans J

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Re: Lycoris aurea
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2010, 07:06:50 AM »
Could it be maybe Lycoris caldwellii ?
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Maggi Young

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Re: Lycoris aurea
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2010, 08:18:51 AM »
I went to PBS to see what L. caldwellii looked like, because I didn't know it....  found this photo from forumist Bill Dijk ( who will, I hope, forgive my posting his picture here  ;)  )

It is of Lycoris albiflora and does show a very spidery flower and crinkled petals..... I believe these hybrids are found quite often in China, too.......
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Alessandro.marinello

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Re: Lycoris aurea
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2010, 02:32:00 PM »
Thanks Maggy and Hans
I add an other image of the flower, more mature, are new additions color shadings
Padova N-E Italy climate zone 8

Afloden

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Re: Lycoris aurea
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2010, 12:00:39 PM »
Alessandro,

 Do the leaves appear in fall or spring?

 If spring then you need to know if the leaves have a faint white stripe down the center of the leaves. Without -- I would put it near shaanxiensis (but I doubt it), with -- I would not say it is either chinensis or guangxiensis.
 
 So, I think your plant has fall produced leaves and would be closest to Xalbiflora or Xhoudyshelii.

 Aaron
Missouri, at the northeast edge of the Ozark Plateau

Paul T

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Re: Lycoris aurea
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2010, 05:04:09 AM »
What about a slightly darker colour form of Lycoris elsae?  Flowers very reminiscent of my elsae, including the shading to pink on the anthers etc?  Definitely more yellow than my version of elsae though.
Cheers.

Paul T.
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Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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