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Author Topic: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere  (Read 7340 times)

David Nicholson

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2007, 09:39:11 AM »
Roll on Spring! ;D
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #16 on: June 23, 2007, 05:13:42 PM »
Are wy worrying too much about global warming ???? ???
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

Lesley Cox

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2007, 05:36:10 AM »
It certainly seems we are Luc, this weekend :-\
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

fermi de Sousa

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2007, 08:41:53 AM »
Well, not quite out yet, but here are the first of the Galanthus elwesii coming into bloom in the rock garden. These are grown in almost full sun with virtually no water during the summer and definitely not in a woodland!
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

fermi de Sousa

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2007, 08:44:56 AM »
Also in flower is a patch of Potentilla alba and a Narcissus romiuexii hybrid.
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2007, 09:28:48 AM »
First signs of your Spring Fermi ??  8)
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

fermi de Sousa

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2007, 01:29:18 AM »
Still very much in winter here, Luc! Wind and rain lashing the window as I type!
The narcissus are delightful in the garden or in pots and survive our frosts which usually only drop down to around -7C! Only -2C so far this year.
The galanthus are starting to open but the light was too poor to get a pic before work this morning!
cheers
fermi
Mr Fermi de Sousa, Redesdale,
Victoria, Australia

Paul T

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Re: June 2007 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2007, 12:56:44 PM »
It's the middle of winter here but the nerines are still flowering!
Well, at three types are still in full bloom. The main one is a pink version of what we call N. flexuosa "Alba" but I've never been sure about its name.
The second is one I got a long time ago as N."Splendens" and it certainly is!
The third is a light pink with small, crinkly flowers on a tall scape, so not N. masonorum or filifolia as far as I can tell; I seem to remember someone calling it N. crispa but I stand to be corrected!
cheers
fermi

Fermi,

The first one looks like some form of Nerine bowdenii, perhaps 'Winter Cheer' given how late it is?  The last one is Nerine undulata.  There has been discussion about Nerine flexuosa alba becoming Nerine undulata alba but to me there is really no comparison.  The proportions between the two are totally different, with the undulata being tall and slim, with rather delicate flowers, unlike the much larger proportions of the flexuosa alba.  The leaves and different as well, so I don't understand why they would shift it, unless of course they've found genetic links that we can't "see".  I mention this only because you commented on your first one being a pink form of the flexuosa alba...... which sort of shows as well just how different the undulata is too!  ;)  I hope this is a help.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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