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Author Topic: Alpine Meadows  (Read 15467 times)

Sinchets

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #60 on: March 09, 2010, 10:21:37 AM »
We have Platanthera bifolia and chlorantha here, both growing in woodlands. I think it must be the higher summer temperatures as many of the other species we would normally think of as grassland species also seem quite happy in woodland at our altitudes. These include Orchis purpurea, simia and pallens and also Himatoglossum. When you gain more altitude the same species are found in montane meadows.
Simon
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Stara Planina, Bulgaria. Altitude 482m.
Lowest winter (shade) temp -25C.
Highest summer (shade) temp 35C.

cohan

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #61 on: March 09, 2010, 08:02:15 PM »
In Sweden we have but a single species of Aster (of course it recently was removed from Aster  :o ) and that in the costal area. What I have is various hieraciums (Some of which recently have been removed from hieracium  :o ) These are so difficult to identify that I do not attempt.  :-\
The reason I cut the perennials down as early as late August is of course that i want my Crocus speciosus to show themselves. I try to cut as late as possible in order to allow seed dispersal.
This is a kind of Scylla/Carybdis situation.
Cheers
Göte

i have only barely attempted to id my asters, since i don't have a good enough reference yet, but i have started to group them at least--so whn i get the reference, i will be halfway there--i suspect there are 3-4 species at least, then probably some natural hybrids; i do have photos of them all, along with locations so i can return to compare later, and seed collected from the different forms--just haven't got all the photos sorted out yet..
aster season (yes, ours are all no longer aster too..lol) issome of the best/most conspicuous flowering of the year, here, with large swathes of roadside painted purple/blue (all our species are in the purple/blue range, some pinker, some bluer, but no true pinks;there are whites too, but they are all in moist areas and not in as large numbers, usually)

i would mow too for fall bulbs if i had them :) asters can have a different space ;)

hadacekf

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #62 on: March 24, 2010, 06:36:24 PM »
Some plants from my meadow.

Crocus oliveri self sown
Crocus olliveri self sown
Iris reticulata K.Hodgin
Cyclamen coum self sow
Cyclamen coum self sow
Scilla-biflora self sown
Crocus vernus
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

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http://www.franz-alpines.org

Gail

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #63 on: March 24, 2010, 08:35:23 PM »
Franz - those are gorgeous pictures, what a lovely variety of plants in your meadow!
Gail Harland
Norfolk, England

Lesley Cox

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #64 on: March 24, 2010, 08:59:35 PM »
I've got used to seeding Crocus and Cyclamen in the alpine meadows but it still surprises me to see reticulate irises. They're responding to Franz's magic touch. No sign of virus there. :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #65 on: March 25, 2010, 09:16:11 AM »
Wonderful.. simply wonderful !
Thanks Franz !
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

hadacekf

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #66 on: March 25, 2010, 07:28:50 PM »
Thank you all together for the kind comments.
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

Franz Hadacek's Alpines And Bulbs
http://www.franz-alpines.org

Ragged Robin

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #67 on: March 26, 2010, 02:01:01 PM »
Franz , your meadow looks spectacular and it must be so satisfying to see it grow and develop over the years with self sown seedlings  :)
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

hadacekf

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #68 on: March 29, 2010, 07:09:46 PM »
Some self sown plants from my meadow.

Primula-acaulis
Viola-canina-ssp.-montana
Anemone-blanda
Chionodoxa-gigantea
Scilla-nana
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

Franz Hadacek's Alpines And Bulbs
http://www.franz-alpines.org

bendgardener

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #69 on: March 30, 2010, 05:01:39 PM »
Great thread.  I started my first attempt last fall.  It looks like I need to continue to add species and see how they shake out.  I used a native fescue grass as a basic ground cover and added about 1,100 crocus to start.  The comments on the differences between varieties of yarrow is good information as it can become invasive in my area.   I think I will add some of the native strawberry plants that do so well here this spring. 
Bob Crain
Bob Crain

elevation 4750 feet in Central Oregon Cascades
zone 5

cohan

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #70 on: March 30, 2010, 06:58:15 PM »
Great thread.  I started my first attempt last fall.  It looks like I need to continue to add species and see how they shake out.  I used a native fescue grass as a basic ground cover and added about 1,100 crocus to start.  The comments on the differences between varieties of yarrow is good information as it can become invasive in my area.   I think I will add some of the native strawberry plants that do so well here this spring. 
Bob Crain

1100 sounds like a good start! wild strawberry sounds like a good idea too; here also it is a super common plant,from full shade to nearly full sun, generally overlooked, yet quite appealing when you look at it!

Bob Resch

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #71 on: April 23, 2010, 01:32:59 AM »
Just came across this thread - I live in a suburb of Chicago, IL, Zone 5b with about 36" on annual precipitation, In 2007,  I replaced an 45' x 25' lawn area with a purchased seed mix of 40% Dwarf Perennial Ryegrass,40% Eureka Hard Fescue, 10% Assorted Flowers (Pink English Daisy, Baby Blue Eyes, & Sweet Alyssum),5% White Yarrow, 5% Salina Strawberry Clover. Through preparation was done to eliminate weeds the season before. The first season of growth I allowed the plants to have their head and sadly the Achillea (Yarrow) dominated. I did not mow the first season and the yarrow topped out at 18-24" with blooms but suppressed all the other species. In 2008 I mowed the growth to 4" at about 10 week intervals. The yarrow did not bloom but some of the flowering plants returned. The mowed yarrow looks soft and feathery, to me a nice improvement over turf. Plus it is drought tolerant. The same mowing practice was followed in 2009 and the flowering species are more prevalent though not overly present. In 2008 Fall I planted Daffodils and crocus in the perimeter areas and some in the center. These have thrived though mowing was delayed until late spring to give daffodils a recovery period. I like what has evolved but I am unhappy with the dominance of the yarrow. It is my belief the seed mix was poorly controlled, correspondence to the company went unanswered. This season I will overseed with a Red Feacue spreading a pound of seed over the stated area and incorporate a few native plants into the space to improve the monocultural appearance.
After all is said and done I encourage converting turf to a colony that is more self sufficient. But be aware, neighbors may look down their noses at the transition. At least some of mine did to the extent of notifying our village of an unkempt lawn. Once I explained my goal and intent to maintain the area within village standards no further problems have come my way.
You may look at a Wisconsin nursery website, (These are not the people from whom I purchased my seed and have had good success from plant purchase) Prairie Nursery in westfield, WI. They have a number of seed mixes that  may find of interest. 

Maggi Young

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #72 on: April 23, 2010, 11:51:15 AM »
Hello Bob and a warm welcome to you!

Interesting to hear your experience with this project in Illinois...... good luck with your ongoing fescue work  :D  Glad you have the neighbours in training now ;D

 We'll be hoping for photos!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Bob Resch

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #73 on: April 29, 2010, 09:49:11 PM »
Reference post of 23 April 2010- Attached are a couple of photos taken in last two days. The recent rains have brought the Yarrow up quickly. In some areas it has broken out of its corral and it is necessary to head in back in. Once established the plant is a bit aggressive. Here and there are what I call "English Daisies" Bellis perennis

Maggi Young

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Re: Alpine Meadows
« Reply #74 on: April 29, 2010, 10:44:43 PM »
Goodness, Bob.... that is lush growth!
I'm glad to see your flock is already increasing.... looks like you're going to need all the wooly munchers you can recruit.... or knit..... ;)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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