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Author Topic: Eucharis amazonica  (Read 4537 times)

Tony Willis

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Eucharis amazonica
« on: December 31, 2009, 11:13:11 AM »
The first flowering of a plant I received as a gift earlier in the year.One I had wanted for a long time and it has certainly lived up to my expectations.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2009, 11:20:49 AM by Tony Willis »
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Hans J

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2009, 11:23:26 AM »
Congratulation Tony !!!

I grow some Eucharis but I have never managed to get flowers

How do you treat your plant ?
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Tony Willis

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2009, 12:36:54 PM »
Hans I thought you would like it and I am very pleased with it,it is beautiful.

Cultivation has been a bit strange. In about June I left it in full sun in the sun lounge.It got hot and dry and it burned of all its leaves which I thought was a disaster. I then put it in a shady room and kept it well watered. Since the autumn it has sat there looking very healthy in a room with night time temperatures of 8c only rising to about 12c during the day. This is far lower than recommended but it has grown new leaves and flowered.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2009, 12:55:08 PM by Tony Willis »
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Melvyn Jope

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2009, 02:00:32 PM »
Congratulations on getting it to flower Tony, something I never succeeded in doing.

Paul T

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2009, 02:11:55 PM »
From memory, they need to dry out a bit to trigger flower formation.  IF memory serves me correctly, changes in temperature trigger it as well.  The time I have had them flower in the past (before one year when I left them out a couple of days too long and they got frosted) was straight after I had brought them in from their shady summer home under our massive magnolia in the back yard.  There, they probably got a bit dryish in late summer, and the temperatures started to drop down.  As frosts threatened I brought them inside and a couple of years I got flowers within the next fortnight.

Since I lost my original lot I have been given bulbs twice and for some reason never got them to establish here.  No idea why, but it has been most disappointing.  They're gorgeous flowers, and wonderful "tropical" looking broad green leaves as well.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Hans J

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2009, 02:33:02 PM »
Cultivation has been a bit strange. In about June I left it in full sun in the sun lounge.It got hot and dry and it burned of all its leaves which I thought was a disaster. I then put it in a shady room and kept it well watered. Since the autumn it has sat there looking very healthy in a room with night time temperatures of 8c only rising to about 12c during the day. This is far lower than recommended but it has grown new leaves and flowered.

I grow all my Eucharis ( and relatet ) in summer outside in my garden in the shade - in winter I take it in the house and let it with 15 .....they are always evergreen.....

Hans
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Alberto

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2009, 02:35:35 PM »
In my experience they go to rest in late summer, yellowing the most part of the leaves, and the temperatures go down. After that I put the pots inside, warmer and humyd and they regrow and flower. The scent is wonderful!

Alberto
North of Italy
where summers are hot and dry and winters are cold and wet
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angie

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2009, 07:29:40 PM »
Tony, what a beautiful flower, another plant that I have never heard of , does it have a nice perfume, it would be such a shame if it didn't.
Angie :)
Angie T.
....just outside Aberdeen in North East Scotland

Tony Willis

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2009, 07:53:14 PM »
I know Alberto says it has a wonderful scent but I can detect nothing at all.Maybe it needs a bit of warmth and so do I.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Paul T

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2009, 11:37:32 PM »
Mine was a lovely perfume too, although quite delicate.  A "clean" smell, fresh and vaguely citrusy, at least in my memory anyway.  It has been a few years since I have experienced it so it often makes the memory a little better than the reality.  ;D ;D
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Maggi Young

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2010, 06:38:05 PM »
There are a whole vase full of the flowers here:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=4795.msg129911#msg129911    ..... lots of super amaryllids in that thread, too!  8)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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mark smyth

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2010, 07:45:11 PM »
I used to have a pot of three but stupidly left them outside for too long and frost got them
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
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Tony Willis

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2011, 10:39:03 AM »
My plant has decided to flower again and has produced three spikes.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Maggi Young

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2011, 03:15:56 PM »
It looks in superb health, Tony.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Graham Catlow

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Re: Eucharis amazonica
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2011, 07:50:45 PM »
Hi Tony,
I wasn't too impressed with the single flower you showed at the begining of this thread, but now that I have seen the whole thing in all it's glory I have changed my mind. That is fantastic. There are so many things on this forum that I would like, and for various reasons couldn't have. This is one of those.
Congratulations.
Bo'ness. Scotland

 


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