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Author Topic: Tree from a greek island  (Read 2644 times)

Hans J

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Tree from a greek island
« on: April 19, 2007, 02:42:00 PM »
Hi all ,

Last year in same time we visit greek islands - near of our appartment on sealevel grows this beautyful trees .
I'm not shure with the name but I have a idea - maybe anyone knows this trees .
I'm glad for a ID to confirm my idea - thank you in advance .
On the ground I found a lot of seeds and so I have collect some and I have sown it - now before few days have start they with germination .
Here comes some pics :

Greetings
Hans
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Maggi Young

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Re: Tree from a greek island
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2007, 07:00:55 PM »
I feel sure I have seen this tree, but I cannot name it! Might it be some kind of wild fig?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Hans J

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Re: Tree from a greek island
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2007, 07:21:57 PM »
Maggi ,

I suppose it is Styrax maybe officinalis -but I'm not 100% shure .
We call this tree "Snowdroptree" -so as a old snowdropfriend I must have it .
Wild fig looks like other fig -I grow it in my garden and we have every year a lot of fig .....my wife makes always a wonderful jam -sometimes with nuts -sometime with ginger .....mhhhhhhh :-*

Hans
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Maggi Young

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Re: Tree from a greek island
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2007, 07:43:29 PM »
A Styrax? Yes, it could be... the flowers were fragrant, you said. The leaves are correct, I think. The other thing I thought it looked like was a Halesia, but I didn't think a Halesia would have found its way to a greek island, though you never know! Similar flower type, though, even if from the wrong part of the world, but Styrax officionalis comes from the right place, around the mediterranean, so that is a sensible choice!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Hans J

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Re: Tree from a greek island
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2007, 07:57:26 PM »
Yes Maggi I know Halesia - and as you said they are not from there .
I would like to have a Halesia but I fear I can give not this plants a good place -so far I know they like acid soil and warmer temperatures .
I saw also Styrax in Turkey and on Cyprus !
Now I'm happy with my few seedlings !
"The bigger the roof damage, the better the view"(Alexandra Potter)

Maggi Young

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Re: Tree from a greek island
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2007, 08:31:24 PM »
I believe it may have been on Cyprus that I saw the Styrax... I felt I had seen it somewhere with citrus fruit trees... I can get the pictures in my mind, but the words do not always come together with the pictures. :-[
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Paul T

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Re: Tree from a greek island
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2007, 04:40:42 AM »
Hans,

I'd be thinking Styrax officionalis, but I am not entirely sure where in Europe it originates.  It definitely looks like it, but I am guessing that there could be closely related species about in localised areas, given how widespread Styrax is throughout the northern hemisphere.  Not something I have seen in person, just read about etc.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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