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Author Topic: Meconopsis punicea  (Read 23747 times)

tetsuo

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2010, 10:00:47 PM »
Thanks for replies, Olegkon, Brian, Johnw, Carlo, and Ian.
 I have never been to China and never seen wild punicea. Are they perennial in wild? In my garden they are not perennial. There are two forms of the seedlings. Most are typical one rosetto type and a few are multi type. I attach two pictures. I expect to raise perennial form,but both are not perennial in my garden in Sapporo.
Tetsuo Nakazato, Sapporo, JAPAN

ichristie

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2010, 12:18:02 PM »
 Hi Tetsuo, we have only ever heard of this one perennial M. punicea which is not as good a red as your pictures. I am sure that other perennil forms do occur in the wild but have no chance to go back to to Stone mountain perhaps one day,  cheers Ian the Christie kind.
Ian ...the Christie kind...
from Kirriemuir

ichristie

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2010, 08:06:02 PM »
Hi again, we now have several meconopsis flowering in the garden so I post some pictures of the M. punicea perennial form and M. punicea as we know it. cheers Ian the Christie kind
Ian ...the Christie kind...
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Brian Ellis

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2010, 08:12:10 AM »
Simply wonderful Ian :)
Brian Ellis, Brooke, Norfolk UK. altitude 30m Mintemp -8C

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2010, 09:17:48 AM »
Real beauties Ian !!  :D
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

gote

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2010, 09:30:26 AM »
Hi Tetsuo, we have only ever heard of this one perennial M. punicea which is not as good a red as your pictures. I am sure that other perennil forms do occur in the wild but have no chance to go back to to Stone mountain perhaps one day,  cheers Ian the Christie kind.
A question Ian: Is the perennial punicea fertile?
Göte

PS
Did I tell you that the second form of Pteridophyllum I got from you started to flower on its fourth year in my place?
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

arisaema

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2010, 10:12:08 AM »
How does the wild-collected perennial form compare to the 7/8ths hybrid? I have one like this that is still alive and putting up new growth after flowering last summer, but if it's just a freak or a true perennial remains to be seen...

James Cobb

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    • Meconopsis World - a visual reference
Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2010, 08:28:15 PM »
I am new to this website and answering old questions may be a waste of time. However- this is one of the easiest species (punicea) to grow here in the east of Scotland. I have grown many thousands of plants over the years; they like a nice rich bed with lots of rotted organic matter. The seed grows on rapidly, completely tolerates pricking on when the first true leaves form and needs planting out as soon as of reasonable size. It always appears to be biennial and small plants still flower. THE DIFFICULTY IS GERMINATION Seed stored cool and dry and sown in January may produce a few seedlings and if none maybe a few the next year. The trick is to sow it immediately the seed pods open - late June here - BUT wait for the pods to open as much Mec seed does not germinate if the pods are picked evemn slightly unripe. I sow in a large tray since seed is plentiful, cover the top with a thin layer of compost and then place the tray in total cool shade protected from rain. A fine net mesh is then placed over the top of the tray and about 10cms compost or soil placed on the top and the whole thing kept moist - but no more- right up until December. I then put the tray with the net removed in a cold grrenhouse and very often seed will germinate in the cold by mid January. I then apply a little bottom heat (all my other Mecs are now in the same greenhouse) - germination and growth is usually rapid and after that they are no trouble. James Cobb.
Meconopsis World - a visual reference
http://meconopsisworld.blogspot.co.uk/

Maggi Young

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2010, 08:38:32 PM »
James, welcome to the Forum.
I can assure you that although some topics may have lain dormant for awhile, there is always interest when we have someone such as yourself to add further light on the subject.
Thank you!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Tony Willis

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2010, 09:45:45 PM »
I received some M.punicea seed from Norway in late 2009 and sowed it straight away leaving it to be frozen under the bench in an unheated greenhouse. It germinated in February and grew away strongly producing about twenty plants.
I was surprised how easily they took to being pricked out but this was of great benefit to them and spurred them on.

I shared these with a friend who looked after them whilst I was on holiday and during which time he potted them on for me. They have made very large plants and are now in the garden(apart from three still in large pots) and I am hopefull of them flowering next year.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

James Cobb

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2010, 02:30:01 PM »
PS It certainly helps if you hand pollinate - the flowers are often quite closed and one rarely sees pollinating insects on them. I also find the biggest and strongest plants set seed most reliably. Also I see I need to be more careful with spellcheck - sorry! James Cobb
Meconopsis World - a visual reference
http://meconopsisworld.blogspot.co.uk/

Roma

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #26 on: March 04, 2011, 08:09:20 PM »
Out with the camera today.  First time since last Sunday.  Was pleased to see these Meconopsis punicea have recovered well after being frosted in late January or early February.  They started growing very fast when we had some relatively mild weather after the snow went and got caught by a severe frost again.
Roma Fiddes, near Aberdeen in north East Scotland.

EmmaCampanula

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #27 on: March 05, 2011, 08:34:43 AM »
@Roma
They really look fine - thank you for sharing.
Due to your post I read the whole thread and was amazed to read, that M. punicea spreads out with runners... I think I should try this Meconopsis too.
Maya, Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany
USDA Zone 6a

Tony Willis

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2011, 09:29:33 AM »
My plants today in the garden. They are all in early bud low down in the rosettes.

I received the seed from Norway in September 09 and sowed it the same day. They germinated early 2010 and grew away rapidly with constant potting on. I planted these out last September ,kept three in pots as a safeguard and gave the rest to a friend. Those in pots are not as good having been protected over the winter  in a frame and the friends have been eaten by rabbits.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Tony Willis

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Re: Meconopsis punicea
« Reply #29 on: April 14, 2011, 05:41:10 PM »
Some Meconopsis punicea raised from seed from Arisaema in Norway in autumn 2009. The first to flower centre left is clearly a hybrid but the others look correct. Either way very pleasing.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

 


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