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Author Topic: Muscari identification.  (Read 2909 times)

david m

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Muscari identification.
« on: March 31, 2007, 02:19:33 PM »

I wonder if anyone can identify this Muscari?
Unfortunately due to combination of nextdoor's cat and my g/son I lost a lot of labels from my pots.
It is very similar to M. latifolium but as you can see has a white throat.
I think and it's only a guess that it may be "muscari sp" from the AGS seed exchange MESE 240 which I had been growing.
Whilst searching the net for inspiration I came across this: cipolline en agrodolce.

http://moon-pie.blogspot.com/2006/05/cipolline-en-agrodolce.html

Has anyone dared try it?
David
David in Kent

Maggi Young

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Re: Muscari identification.
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2007, 04:54:38 PM »
David, re eating the bulbs : see this thread   http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=36.0
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Anthony Darby

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Re: Muscari identification.
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2007, 09:27:35 PM »
Time was when I had a sea of untidy grape hyacinths (the leaves were too long for the flowers). They went in the skip. Should have fried them ???
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
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Lesley Cox

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Re: Muscari identification.
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2007, 11:46:28 PM »
Re your above link Maggi, would the fact that Puglia has a declining population have anything to do with their liking for Muscari bulbs? :)

The Cipolline do indeed look delicious but the uncooked bulbs pictured don't look like the regular Muscari that most of us grow, rather too flat surely? But I'm tempted to try just one, to see what the result is and if no ill effects, wouldn't mind them as a regular thing. They'd make a lovely tapa.

(Roger and I had a local haggis (for which a particular Dunedin butcher is famous) as a tapa recently, at a small bar called Albar (Alba) in town, at a whisky tasting. It was served with thick cream, red currant jelly and crisp water crackers and was very good. Although the whiskies are promoted and sampled generously, the bar in general is a regular wine bar and serves a selection of tapas every night. One of my favourite "locals.")
« Last Edit: March 31, 2007, 11:55:20 PM by Lesley Cox »
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: Muscari identification.
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2007, 10:17:28 AM »
Most of the pictures I have found when searching for references to these "cipollini" show these flatter, more disc-shaped bulbs.... not like any muscari we are growing! I've decided to stick with chocolate, meantime, don't want to join the decling Puglians!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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