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Author Topic: Hemerocallis  (Read 20358 times)

Paul T

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #45 on: July 12, 2009, 01:56:22 AM »
Guff,

How many seedlings have you had flower now?  Lots I would imagine?  I don't think I'll look at that site.... too many things I'll want and can't have. ;D

I'm going to have to investigate whether the 'Destined to See' is here in Aus.  The more I see your pic, the more I like it.  Probably absolutely horrendously expensive if it is.....  ::)  More likely not here yet, although that greatly depends on how old it is of course.

I wonder how variable it's seedlings would be?  I guess like so many of these highly hybridised things it isn't self compatible.  I'm wondering whether the more solid pink of the 'Bella Serra' will overtake the delicate markings?  Then again, maybe it will impart the other way.  That is the beauty of raising from seed, isn't it.  Good luck, I'm sure you'll end up with some crackers if you're successful. 8)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2009, 01:59:13 AM by Paul T »
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Guff

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #46 on: July 12, 2009, 02:14:34 AM »
Paul, Destined To See is only about $10 for 1 or 2 fans here. I bet when it was first introduced in 1998, it was in the $150-200+ range. Yes there are some expensive daylilys at the lily auction site, but it's fun to browse anyways.

Summers are short here in New York, it takes me 3+ years to see flowers. Down south seedlings flower in 9 months or so from seed. It's just a hobby for me, so the time factor really doesn't matter. I have scapes on dips seedlings, no flowers have opened yet this year. I should see my first Tet seedlings flower next year, mostly Bella Sera crosses.

Paul T

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #47 on: July 12, 2009, 12:18:59 PM »
If it is 10 years old then there is a chance it will be out here at least, which is a good thing.  Thanks for the extra info.

Good luck with the seedlings, and please keep us posted on some of your babies.  I for one would love to see them.  8)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Lesley Cox

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #48 on: July 12, 2009, 10:04:34 PM »
Lesley,

I must admit that in general I prefer the smaller "miniature" varieties, but I love some of the big showy "round" ones, particularly with good eye zones.  One of my favourite minis is 'Knick Knack', which is a quite small flower but very prolific.  The colour is this intense tangerine.  I have a large type called 'Simply Pretty' which matches it almost perfectly in colour as well.  'Mosel' is a nice mini cream, 'Little Zinger' is a nice mini red.  There's some beauties out there. :D

I'll keep looking then. There are a lot available in NZ. The tangerine sounds very nice. A colour I love.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Regelian

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #49 on: July 14, 2009, 08:41:15 AM »
This last weekend I was in Berlin for the annual Hemerocallis Europa meeting.  The following fotos are from the garden of Tomas Tamberg, well known for his cutting edge work with apogon Iris, works with Hemerocallis as well.  His main interest has been with producing garden plants with a 'wild' look.  Essentially improvements on the species with clear pigmentation.  In the last few years he has branched out into creating modern daylilies, particularly with eye zones. 

The four attached eyed seedlings all use Dan Trimmer wonderful 'Dan Mahoney' as a parent.  If you've ever seen this cultivar, you will quickly note it passes on its rounded eye zone, as well as its rich raspberry rose colouring.  For those who wonder where the EZ comes from, it is the result of converting Elizabeth Salter's 'Dragon's Eye' to tetraploid and crossing it into the existing EZ hybrids.  As Dragon's Eye has a but 4" / 11cm flower on a good day, it took a while to get these 6" / 15cm blossoms.

Attached are a few of his seedlings and introductions.

Berlin Multi (dip)
Berlin Multi (dip)
verspertina x altissima SDL
SDL- from Dan Mahoney
SDL- from Dan Mahoney
SDL- from Dan Mahoney
SDL- from Dan Mahoney
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

Ragged Robin

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #50 on: July 14, 2009, 02:50:57 PM »
Lovely shots, Jamie, looks like you had good weather....the Berlin Multi looks magnificent as a 'stand' of flowers (if that's what one calls it?) the fountain of leaves below the tall striking yellow heads is fabulous.

I am not certain I like the more complex patterns but I do find them interesting and maybe would get a better idea seeing the whole plant?  For me, I suppose it's the shape of the trumpet and edge of petal that is my thing although the anthers of SDL- from Dan Mahoney certainly have a wow factor   :o
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

David Nicholson

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #51 on: July 14, 2009, 02:56:03 PM »
I constantly marvel at the skill of people to create flowers like those.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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Anthony Darby

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #52 on: July 14, 2009, 11:31:11 PM »
I have always been let down by day lilies, but suspect it is picking varieties that don't suit Dunblane? The names are fantastic. I have 'Bark at me' and 'Yabbadabbadoo' among others. No flowers open yet.
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
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http://www.dunblanecathedral.org.uk/Choir/The-Choir.html

Guff

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #53 on: July 15, 2009, 03:01:55 AM »
Jamie, thats last one is very nice.

A few more opened, going to post another picture of Destined To See and Orangutan.

DestinedToSee2.jpg
Orangutan2.jpg
BigSmile.jpg
DruidsChant.jpg
UnknownRedSpider.jpg
UnknownPink.jpg
« Last Edit: July 02, 2011, 11:53:37 AM by Maggi Young »

Paul T

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #54 on: July 15, 2009, 06:35:18 AM »
Jamie,

My favourite is the first of the Dan Mahoney seedlings.  Nice shape and markings.

Guff,

I still like the 'Destined to See', but the Druids Chant does have a lovely shape and markings as well.  DTS markings on DC shape would be spectacular!! :o
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Guff

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #55 on: July 15, 2009, 07:46:46 AM »
Paul, I will take another picture of Druid's Chant when another one opens, that first flower isn't it's best.

Well I was worried it might rain and ruin this Polytepal Bella Sera flower before I saw it in the morning. Picture taken at 2:30 am. If it doesn't rain I will take another in daylight.

Regelian

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #56 on: July 15, 2009, 08:17:53 AM »
Here are some more tetraploids with patterned EZs and watermarks.

Addis Ababa (Moldovan) tet
Ancient Reflections (Salter) tet
Bird Talk (Lambertson) tet
Blueberry Smash (Scott) tet
Blues Avenue (Morss) tet
Drink The Light (Lambertson) tet
Eyes A Blue (Lambertson) tet
Heaven's Declairing (Morss) tet
Jerry Hyatt (Hanson) tet
Lighter Than Air (Salter) tet
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

Paul T

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #57 on: July 15, 2009, 01:02:27 PM »
Jamie,

I love the combinations of colours in 'Ancient Reflections'.  Quite unusual.  And 'Eyes a Blue' is pretty impressive too.... unlike anything I've come across before.  Very nice.  'Heaven's Declaring' has an interesting eye zone.  I have a purple unnamed one here (bought as mixed plants, so no name) with a similar "ghost" eye-zone as I tend to think of it.  Rather than a colour, it is almost like a pale shadow absence of colour.  Gives a totally different effect, doesn't it.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2009, 01:04:43 PM by Paul T »
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Guff

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #58 on: July 15, 2009, 07:39:48 PM »
Jamie, you have some nice daylilies.

BellaSera3.jpg
BellaSera4.jpg




« Last Edit: July 02, 2011, 11:54:11 AM by Maggi Young »

Regelian

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Re: Hemerocallis
« Reply #59 on: July 19, 2009, 09:40:03 AM »
Hier is a collage of the same seedling under different weather conditions.  This year has been very rainy, hot-cold and insect ridden.  Deffinitely one of the worst years to my memory for Hemerocallis.  The lavender to purple tones are strongly effected by temperature, the reds less so.  Although this seedling appears pink, it is actually quite lavender under cooler conditions.  The pink is coming from a carotene pigment, lycopene, combined with the lavender anthocyanins (cyanidin pigment).

Seedling X Lola Branham (diploid)
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

 


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