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Author Topic: Nerine 2008  (Read 28755 times)

johnw

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #30 on: September 21, 2008, 01:49:36 AM »
I grow mine in 2L pots and dread they day I'll need to repot and divide. Nerine roots are active all year and dont die back every year like, for example, Narcissus. My pots are already a mass of roots

Mark - I certainly can sympathize.  To minimize bench space I even planted a few of the pots with two levels of bulbs.  Mercifully there weren't too many with offsets. Nerines do seem to perform better if there is a bit of moisture in the pot bottoms throughout the dormant period to keep those roots alive. I may have mentioned before that I have even grown them in pure sand.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

johnw

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #31 on: September 22, 2008, 02:08:26 AM »
I grow mine in 2L pots and dread they day I'll need to repot and divide. Nerine roots are active all year and dont die back every year like, for example, Narcissus. My pots are already a mass of roots

Mark - When I transplanted all the Nerines I had to remove the dead roots, clean off the old basal plates, remove some of the ancient bulb coats and sort through the live roots. It was extremely time consuming - every night for two weeks. I wonder if the summer before transplanting it might be wise to dry off all the roots and start afresh. It certainly would make the job a lot easier and they seem to make new roots quickly.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

mark smyth

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #32 on: September 22, 2008, 02:39:15 PM »
I dont think it would be a good idea to dry the roots. Ian Young might have an opinion on this
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

mark smyth

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #33 on: September 22, 2008, 10:48:18 PM »
My first sarniensis, 'Harlequin' is now open and spot on last year's flowering date September 22nd

The leaves are coming on fast now also
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

johnw

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #34 on: September 22, 2008, 11:24:55 PM »
I dont think it would be a good idea to dry the roots. Ian Young might have an opinion on this

It would make replanting a lot easier, it was hell trying to deal with roots and many different sized bulbs per pot and keeping them upright while in-filling. When I first started growing nerines I routinely kept them bone-dry in the summertime and killed all the roots. They always re-bounded though in retrospect that may not have been ideal; they bloomed much later than they do these days.

Smashing 'Harlequin' there and new to me.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

mark smyth

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #35 on: September 26, 2008, 01:44:22 PM »
John I can send you a bulbil next summer
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

johnw

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #36 on: September 26, 2008, 05:38:43 PM »
Mark - That would be great, I'll surely have something to offer for trade by then.

Getting ready for Hurricane Kyle and 100 mm of rain on the weekend. Time to move the Dahlia in so seed set is assured.

johnw
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Maggi Young

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2008, 07:21:54 PM »


Getting ready for Hurricane Kyle and 100 mm of rain on the weekend. Time to move the Dahlia in so seed set is assured.

johnw

sounds like it may be wise to move a lot of stuff "in", John! Hope Kyle passes without too much damage to you and yours.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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mark smyth

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2008, 08:03:45 PM »
I havent seen Kyle mentioned yet on TV here
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Tony Willis

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #39 on: September 27, 2008, 11:30:29 AM »
This is my Nerine bowdenii 'Quinton Wells. It has been in flower about 3 weeks. It is very robust and the flower head is about 7 inches across
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Gerdk

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #40 on: September 27, 2008, 08:29:34 PM »
Tony,
This is the species from Mont aux Sources (Lesotho probably) which I showed here at Sept. 11th.
It was predicated a ' hardy alpine bulb ' and indeed it is!

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Tony Willis

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #41 on: September 27, 2008, 10:41:08 PM »
Gerd I do not know if it is the same plant as yours.I notice that yours has full leaf growth whilst mine is in flower with no leaves at all.I was given it a couple of years ago and do not know where it came from originally.I will try and find out. I have not tried it outdoors through the winter.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Gerdk

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #42 on: September 28, 2008, 11:04:58 AM »
Gerd I do not know if it is the same plant as yours.I notice that yours has full leaf growth whilst mine is in flower with no leaves at all.I was given it a couple of years ago and do not know where it came from originally.I will try and find out. I have not tried it outdoors through the winter.

Your reply gives me reason to quote extracts of a letter from Harry Hay which I received in
1995

.... Nerine bowdenii var. wellsii (was) orig collected Natal Drakensberg at top of Mont-aux-Sources .... (my plants are) from seeds sent, and collected by Prof. E. R. Delpierre in 1965.
Parent bulbs now 30 year old, and in good order, 100 % frost and wet hardy. They have been frozen solid day and night for as long as six weeks. ... My name is botanically correct ....
The name ' Quinton Wells ' is a nonsense and is no longer used in the U.K.
N. bowdenii var. wellsii is used to try and improve hardyness in the N. bowdenii complex.
P.S.: Plant N. B. v. wellsii bulbs with necks proud of the soil level


My plant developes leaves about the beginning of summer whether in a pot (which improves flowering) or planted outside. When in a pot I keep it cold and totally dry in winter after the leaves faded.

Gerd
« Last Edit: September 28, 2008, 04:35:07 PM by Gerdk »
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Tony Willis

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #43 on: September 28, 2008, 04:50:02 PM »
Gerd

thank you for that information.

I have spoken to my friend who gave me the bulb.

He tells me that it is now called N. bowdenii var wellsii in the RHS plantfinder.

Quinton Wells was a man who had a nursery near Oxford and why his name is attached to this form is a mystery.

He wonders how it can be a N. bowdenii when it is evergreen which bowdenii is not and the bulbs, and flower head are so much larger than that species. i am not getting into that discussion.

He also told me that his is evergreen and the reason mine is flowering with no leaves is because it is badly grown!!

Whatever the reason it is a super plant.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Paul T

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #44 on: September 29, 2008, 12:11:15 PM »
He also told me that his is evergreen and the reason mine is flowering with no leaves is because it is badly grown!!

Tony,

Or you just have a different enough climate/microclimate so it goes dormant during summer.  If it is growing and flowering I wouldn't change anything, regardless of whether or not someone says it is "badly grown".  ;D
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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