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Author Topic: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 3563 times)

Robert

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2024, 09:22:54 PM »


The earliest of the Erythronium multiscapideum are starting to emerge from the soil. Spring is not far away in our part of Northern California.



Another great success has been with Hypericum anagalloides. I have been trying for years to establish this species in our Sacramento garden. I finally grew a seed accession that shows great promise. I enjoy this tiny mat forming species. The color of the autumn/winter foliage is very pleasing. This species produces many tiny bright yellow flowers throughout the spring and early summer.



Ione Manzanita, Arctostaphylos myrtifolia, is the first Manzanita species to start blooming in our Sacramento garden. Ione Manzanita is a low spreading species endemic to the ultramafic soils near Ione, California. I have two distinct accessions of this species in our garden.



The pristine white flowers of Common Manzanita, Arctostaphylos manzanita, are beautiful. On a moonlit evening the flowers glow like tiny lanterns hanging in the plants. This is an amazing sight and experience.



The bark and branches of Manzanita are extremely attractive too. The polished bark flakes and peels when the plants are in active growth, revealing a lighter cinnamon-colored bark beneath. And each species is different.

[Jasmin]:  It always amazes me to watch the formation of the nascent inflorescences on all the Arctostaphylos species while the blooming season is still months away.  These inflorescences grow into these clusters of “fingers” and then seem to pause during the peak of summer.  In some species, the inflorescences turn downward fairly soon, but others remain upright for a time first.  As soon as the weather changes, they morph yet again, fattening up.  You have to watch them carefully, since they can seem like they are doing nothing for ages, and suddenly you see the flowers.
     The Aristolocchia has begun its growth, and now one can see the early flower development.  At first, the flowers are so small, it is hard to distinguish them from the future leaves; however, it does not take long for them to grow sufficiently to look like elven slippers.  From there, they will continue to elongate and grow into their traditional saxophone or pipe shape.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
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MarcR

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2024, 01:09:45 AM »
Hi Robert,

I grow  Arctostaphylos manzanita, and 2 Oregon species whose names I have forgotten.

My  Arctostaphylos begin blooming about 6 weeks behind yours.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Leena

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2024, 11:52:57 AM »
looks like someone is skiing in your woods

That is my husband clearing the snow off the road. :)

Mariette, I hope your plants are ok and the snow has protected them from cold. Here plants are still dormant under snow, so mostly it doesn't matter if it is so cold.

Robert and Jasmine,
we have now about 50-60cm snow in my area. That is more than usually. Normally the most snow is in March and it is only January now, so most likely the snow cover will still increase.
Climate change has increased the winter rains, and if temperatures are below freezing, that means there is more snow. If temperatures are several degrees above normal, it means it will be rain and that is not good, if ground is frozen. Winter 2020 was very warm, and there was hardly any snow, then again last winter it was rain and very wet first, then snow until beginning of April. How deep ground freezees, it varies. In my area in my clay soil in the past 40 years it has been from no ground frost at all (2020) to 80cm ground frost, and medium at the end of the winter has been little over 40cm. This year it is 20cm so far, but it is deepening as winter continues. https://wwwi3.ymparisto.fi/i3/tilanne/FIN/routa/LOS.htm

You can grow so many beautiful plants, and Acis seems a good substitute to snowdrops. :)
Leena from south of Finland

Yann

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2024, 04:29:53 PM »
While outside it's snow and ice it slowly wakes up in the greenhouses. As usual Scilla and Muscari are the first of the season.

Hyacinthoides mauritanica





Bellevalia hyacinthoides

718375-2



Androcymbium rechingeri in bloom for 2 weeks and it'll continue until mid february.

 718379-4
« Last Edit: January 21, 2024, 04:33:43 PM by Yann »
North of France

Robert

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2024, 07:09:35 PM »
Yann,

Nice photographs and very interesting plants.  8)  It must be nice to have a greenhouse to protect plants and bring plants into bloom earlier in the season.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2024, 09:55:42 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2024, 07:10:28 PM »
Hi Robert,

I grow  Arctostaphylos manzanita, and 2 Oregon species whose names I have forgotten.

My  Arctostaphylos begin blooming about 6 weeks behind yours.

Hi Marc,

Do your Manzanitas preform well in your garden?

Do you grow Arctostaphylos manzanita ssp. manzanita or one of the other subspecies, ssp. elegans, ssp. glaucescens, ssp. laevigata?

Do you know the origin of your Manzanita plants? Wild or cultivar forms?

I neglected to state that I grow Arctostaphylos manzanita ssp. manzanita. I have several accessions from various locations and elevations in California. I have seen some very nice forms of Arctostaphylos manzanita ssp. elegans in Colusa County, California. Unfortunately, I never gathered seed or took cuttings from these plants, however their location is in my field notes. I have plenty of good reasons to return to Snow Mountain and Colusa County.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

MarcR

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2024, 10:59:03 PM »
Robert,

I grow both ssp manzanita, and ssp laevigata.  Both ssp struggled at first; in fact I lost 2 or 3 plants of each before I got any survivers.  Both are doing well now; but, I think they would prefer less winter chill.  The Oregon natives are both thriving.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Robert

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2024, 01:28:09 AM »
Marc

Thank you for the information.  :)
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Gabriela

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #23 on: January 28, 2024, 08:22:44 PM »
After a very cold period with lots of snow (not as much as Leena's) the January ended with a thaw for Ontario, which is called, guess - January thaw :) It is a sudden warm up that usually lasts a few days.
The first pictures were taken on Jan. 23 when the warming began; I took the occasion to dig out from the snow my very unusual early snowdrop, which I think I previously shown here. The last pictures from Jan. 26.



I don't really like the fact that most of the snow is gone because it may not snow before the cold returns. It also rained and some areas are completely exposed by now. On the other hand, the snowdrop can enjoy the day light again :)


Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
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MarcR

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2024, 07:16:47 AM »
Gabriela,

It is really interesting how the snow stacked on the chair.  It almost looks sculpted.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Gabriela

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2024, 12:30:22 AM »
Gabriela,
It is really interesting how the snow stacked on the chair.  It almost looks sculpted.

Marc, the chair actually shows a summary of snow, freezing rain and rain, followed by snow again for the January. I didn't clean it on purpose.
The first heavy snow was very wet and stuck to the wood, it was compacted by rain and ice, then few lighter snowing sessions went on top. The wind has put an imprint on all of it.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Leena

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2024, 04:39:40 PM »
The first pictures were taken on Jan. 23 when the warming began; I took the occasion to dig out from the snow my very unusual early snowdrop.

I'm sure your early snowdrop appreciates having the snow removed from on top of it.  :) Also here in very snowy and late winters many snowdrops come up and flower inside the snow. Some take it better than others. I hope you don't get any really cold temperatures. Here it is also now not as cold as it was in early part of January, but everything is still covered by snow which is good as it will get colder again in February. No snowdrops in sight yet, but in March at the latest I can't resist digging the snow to search for snowdrops inside the snow. :)
Leena from south of Finland

Mike Ireland

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2024, 11:26:33 AM »
Daphne bholua Jacqueline Postill managed to stay in bud until after the heavy storms, also Hamamellis x intermedia Westerstede.
Both usually look a little bedraggled by now.
Mike
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

MarcR

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2024, 04:59:55 AM »
About 2 weeks ago we got 28" of snow in 10 hours. It's mostly gone now except or sheltered drifts and snow plow heaps. a few of my Galanthus started blooming when the snow melted down to 2-3". Still blooming after the snow, I have:

ERICACEAE Caluna vulgaris; Erica: carnea, glandulosa, lusitanica; mackayana ssp Andevalensis, manipuliflora;

BULBS  Androcymbium burchelii, cuspidatum; melanthoides;
Antholyza [Gladiolus] abreviatus; Aristea monticola, pusilla; Babiana cuneata, longicyma; Chasmanthe bicolor, floribunda; Dierama pendulum; Cyclamen coum, creticum, graecum, purpurascens; Eriospermum paradoxum, Ferraria ferrariola;
Galaxia fugacissima; Gladiolus hyalinus, maculatus; Hesperantha luticola;
Homeria [Moraea] collina; Moraea polystachya; Romulea atranda, longipes, monticola; Syringodea longituba; Tritonia dubia;

PERENNIALS  Cyphia digitata; Hebenstreitia dentata,parviflora; Hermannia althioides, flamea; Jamesbrittenia stellata; Lessertia montana; Nemesia denticulata;
Oftia africana; Peliostemum viscosum; Primula vulgaris; Salvia disermas; Sutera caerulea; Tephrosia capensis;

SHRUBS & TREES  Abutilon sonneratianum; Adenandra obtusa;
Agathosma gonaquensi,venustus; Anisodontea anomala; Aspalathus nivea; Brachysiphon fucatus; Coleonema polchellum; Cyclopia genistoides; Greyia flanaganii; Hermannia alnifolia; Indigofera nigromontana; Liparia splendens; Podalyria calyptrata; Polygala myrtifolia;Searsia lucida.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2024, 05:21:19 AM by MarcR »
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Mariette

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Re: January 2024 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2024, 07:38:05 PM »
This is a really impressing array of flowering plants at this time of the year! Fortunately, the snow has gone here, and with snowdrops, cyclamen and crocusses starting and the birds singing I hope it doesn´t come back till next winter!

Yann, a choice collection flowering in Your green-house! Here are none in flower, whether indoors or outdoors.

 


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