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Author Topic: March 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 3251 times)

MarcR

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Re: March 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #60 on: March 30, 2023, 06:50:08 AM »
My Nemophila; my Corydalis flexuosa and cava; my Eranmthis; my Leucojum; my Cornus mas; my Pulsatilla; and one of my roses started blooming today. My Fritelaria imperialis aeveral Erythroniums and several Anemonies and Cercis Occidentalis are in bud. My Aqiilegias anmd Lupins are showing foliage. It seems like everything everywhere all at once.
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F -9.4C.  Rainfall 50" 110 cm + but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight. Soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus. 
Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix

Leena

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Re: March 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #61 on: March 30, 2023, 11:03:59 AM »
Hybrids between Corydalis solida and malkensis occur spontaneously in gardens where both are growing, I never bred them intentionally. In most cases they may be recognized by the broad lip and blush colouring. Where the solida parent was white, it´s more difficult to tell them apart. The pic shows a white corydalis with somewhat broader lip, as well as bracts that show just very slight incisions. I guess, that´s a hybrid as well. The plant in the back and left is definitely C. malkensis, showing the typically more creamy white colour of that species.

Thank you, Mariette. I had thought that C.malkensis doesn't hybridize (easily) with others, but I have also two seedlings which I was wondering if they could be hybrids with C.malkensis and C.solida? The first one has entire bracts like C.malkensis. The other one is very similar but has bracts more like C.solida. Both these flowered for the first time last spring. What do you think?
Leena from south of Finland

Leena

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Re: March 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #62 on: March 30, 2023, 11:11:10 AM »
Luc, your E.hendersonii is so beautiful!

Robert, I also like your E.oregonum. I have managed to grow it from seeds to flower (no clumps yet), and it seems to grow also here, or at least it got through winter 2022 which was very bad. Now they are still under snow.
One more winter picture from yesterday when I saw badger tracks. Poor thing has woken already, I don't know what it will find to eat.

Leena from south of Finland

Robert

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Re: March 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #63 on: March 30, 2023, 01:26:15 PM »
Leena,

The Erythronium oregonum in our garden have been very slow to start stooling out and forming clumps, but they are slowly spreading now.

Have you tried the North American high elevation species of Erythronium? Given your climatic conditions it seems that they would thrive in your garden. These species are extremely beautiful.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Leena

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Re: March 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #64 on: March 30, 2023, 04:41:30 PM »
Have you tried the North American high elevation species of Erythronium? Given your climatic conditions it seems that they would thrive in your garden. These species are extremely beautiful.

My plants are almost all grown from seed ex seeds, so they are mostly E.revolutum (hybrids) and E.oregonum (hybrids). it would be interesting to try different species. I have one year old seedlings of E.grandiflorum, but they haven't been outside for the winter yet. 'White Beauty', 'Pagoda' and 'Joanna' do well in woodland bed. :)
Leena from south of Finland

 


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