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Author Topic: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 2069 times)

Robert

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February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« on: February 05, 2023, 08:33:11 PM »


Yesterday 4 February, my brother sent me this photograph from Donner Summit in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The snow pack is deep and it appears that the coming wildflower season in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and foothills will be outstanding.



As Gabriela stated in the January thread…

“The Flora of California is so rich! you are blessed with an infinite resource of inspiration.”

I agree 100% the flora of California is very rich and it is a infinite resource of inspiration for me.

Thank you Gabriela for the reminder!  :)

Pictured above is Delphinium patens ssp. patens emerging from its summertime dormancy. This plant is 5 years old and blooms consistently each year. This group of plants was derived from a 2017 seed accession from the Kanaka Valley area of El Dorado County, California, elevation 1,013 feet (309 meters). Locally we have many native Delphinium species that can be found in habitats ranging from the Lower Sonoran Life Zone in the Sacramento Valley to the Canadian/Hudsonian Life Zones high in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Over many years, I have observed a great deal of variability within the various species. I have grown many of our local Delphinium species and the F1 plants are fertile. I am now in a position to move forward with these beautiful plants. Ironically, they can be challenging to cultivate well in garden settings in our part of interior California. I enjoy the challenge, so I will continue to grow these outstanding plants in our Sacramento garden.

[Jasmin]:  We have been blessed with some ideal garden weather:  Just sunny enough to begin our front yard garden project, followed by sufficient rain to more deeply water in the newest plantings.

Due to the locations of electrical (red coding), natural gas (yellow flags, yellow coding), and water lines (blue coding), we decided to change the locations of the Aristolochia, their frames and support posts.  If any future utilities work happens, these will not need to be disturbed.



Two frameworks are now facing the street, and one is placed between two deciduous Azaleas.  One set of street-facing posts is particularly tall, meant to support the Lilium henryi hybrids that are just behind.  They have always grown so tall, and we have never had a tall enough support for their proper display.



The two panels are well set back from the sidewalk so they will not be interfered with.  We have cinder blocks and some bricks to configure areas of dry-shade and dry-sun loving plants.  The very foreground will continue to have the Narcissus Daffodils and Iris—Plants common enough that if some are damaged by utilities projects or garden thugs (People who have their minds on their cellphones, not where they are walking, walking their dog, or prams and children—Wow! I sound like an evil witch!), we will not feel devastated.  This can require an inordinate amount of planning, beyond heeding the utilities’ markings.  Over the years, as cellphone usage has come to dominate people’s mindspace, it still never ceases to amaze us how oblivious people are!  How is it they are even allowed to have a dog or children, when they move like robots attentive only to their device!  I know there is no answer, and this is the reality.  At least no one is browsing—yet—on the garden, but it will not surprise us, despite the fact we know Narcissus is toxic.  What adults just put in their mouths, as if by compulsion and fast as a toddler too!  When we still had a plant nursery and sold at the farmers market we had a woman tear a piece of Scutellaria and promptly consumed it.  It was clearly labeled not to be eaten, that it was not even the herb, that it was ornamental and toxic.  She never asked, just ate, and when reprimanded proceeded to spew foul language and insults. 

Over time, various front yards now include different versions of “No dog” signs, and we do not know if it will come to that for us.  We shall see.  I would not mind a “turkey crossing” or some other bird-oriented sign.
We moved a few clumps of Narcissus, yet a few still ended up sliced into by the posts.  No lilies were affected. 



For many years our front yard had sweet peas, and they will still have their presence.  One was conveniently near one of the panels, and is already beginning its steady ascent.  Others will be trained to lead to the support frame and allowed to grow from there on.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2023, 08:34:27 PM »


Finally, each panel now has its Aristolochia.  Each is grown enough to begin training on the frames.  They were watered in, and we cleaned up just as rain began—a perfect conclusion for the day.

At the next opportunity, we will focus on cinder block and brick placements, for the dry-loving bulbs and plants.  Rocks will be incorporated as well.

Mr. Ian McDonald:  Such a shame the quarries are not open to public sales!  Perhaps it is a result of the Gold Rush, but there are areas of so much rock in public spaces that is not protected that no one thinks anything of picking up a rock here and there to bring home.  Granted, loading a car or truck full would get some strange looks and perhaps inquiries or intervention from authorities!  Also, when there are remodel projects, the broken concrete pieces can be useful in some instances.  Over time, dirt and moss do wonders to hide this repurposed material, so it becomes attractive as a rock garden medium.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2023, 08:31:38 PM »
While Sierra Nevada is under snow, in north of France spring arrived.
As each year a visit to Delabroye nursery is a must, here're the first hellebores blossoms of the year. Once again choosing a plant to buy is a difficult hesitation game.

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Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2023, 08:32:31 PM »
...



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North of France

Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2023, 08:33:17 PM »
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North of France

Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2023, 08:34:02 PM »
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Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2023, 08:35:21 PM »
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North of France

Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2023, 08:37:46 PM »
Voilà, i hope this kaleidoscope of colours brings you a few sunshine.
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North of France

Jeffnz

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2023, 09:16:08 PM »
Yann
A great set of hellebore flowers, especially those that look to be of an apricot shade.
You should be very pleased to have these.

Robert

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2023, 07:00:06 PM »


Spring is slowly arriving to our part of Northern California. The weather has turned dry, however temperatures are generally trending well below average for this time of year.

[Jasmin]:  Our nights have been either just below 0º C or a degree or two slightly above, and daytime highs have been ranging from 10º C to today’s crazy prediction of 20º C!  The wind out of the north has been quite icy; even standing in the sun feels brisk.  Although more rain would be welcome, I also crave a bit of warm sun too.  Ever since the December and January storms, I do not feel fully recovered, never mind our area.  There is still so much clean-up going on around our area.

This weekend the front garden project is postponed as pruning takes priority.  Pauses are good for evaluating progress, and considering alterations to plans.  Relocating the more common bulbs and tubers to the very front will allow us more space in the core of the front, which faces north, and is even cooler and moister under the canopy of the Quercus.  Both of us have some annuals and small perennials we would like to experiment with.

Robert again:



Crocus tommasinianus is easy to grow and provides early spring flower color in our garden. I grew the original plants from seed, however despite having a number of clones from the same set of seeds my existing plants have never set seed.



Crocus biflorus ssp. isauricus thrives both in our cider block garden as well as the open garden.



The early Hoop Petticoat Narcissus are blooming throughout the garden.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
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If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
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Robert

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2023, 07:03:26 PM »


2022 was my first full season of gardening after being occupied for years with other priorities and doing the best I could to keep the garden alive. I have had a full season now to contemplate the future direction of the garden. Climate change is certainly a strong consideration. As stated in an earlier posting, dealing with consistent summertime high temperatures in the 43 to 46 C range may be our new reality. We also need to contend with persistent drought. Despite abundant precipitation to date, there is no indication that the on going 22 years of drought will end. It appears that drought may also be the new normal.

I have gained a great deal of inspiration and helpful gardening wisdom from Ian Young and his Bulb Log. Implementing Ian’s admonition to look to nature for gardening inspiration is priceless and this is exactly what I am doing as I contemplate all the facets of our Northern California garden.

I have so many fine local native plant species to experiment with in our garden. These plants have evolved with drought, extreme summertime heat, and all the other attributes associated with our climate and local ecosystems. Pictured above is Delphinium patens ssp. patens a local species that I am currently working on incorporating into our new garden scheme.



Here Delphinium patens ssp. patens can be seen in a range of color forms. Delphinium patens ssp. patens is just one of many Delphinium species that grow locally in our part of Interior Northern California.



I have not been satisfied by my current selection of summer annuals in our garden. Here Lessingia leptoclada is pictured blooming in its native habitat in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. This natural look is what I desire in our garden. Lessingia blooms all summer in our Sacramento garden and is extremely drought and heat tolerant. Perfect!  8)



In its native habitat, Calycadenia truncata is often seen growing with Lessingia leptoclada. I have grown Calycadenia truncata, however it will require some additional effort to become well established in our garden.



Madia elegans is a late summer bloomer. Many natural varieties of this species can be found in our area. Gathering seeds of some forms is as easy as walking down the road at our Placerville property to gather a few seeds. Other interesting variations of this species can be found in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2023, 07:06:26 PM »


Malacothrix floccifera blooms during the spring and is a beautiful drought tolerant annual.



I am keenly interested in our local native Phrymacaea. Pictured is Diplacus kelloggii in its native habitat.



During seasons with abundant precipitation masses of Diplacus kelloggii can be seen in their native habitat.



Diplacus kelloggii is also a natural rock garden species. Here it can be seen growing on a rock ledge near Camp Creek, California.
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Robert

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2023, 07:10:47 PM »


Many other Phrymacaea species are native to our region. Here Diplacus layneae can be seen in a natural rock setting.



Diplacus mephiticus is found growing at higher elevations in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Pictured is the yellow flowering form of this fine species.



This is a fine example of Diplacus torreyi I found growing in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. It is excellent forms like this that I wish to establish in our Sacramento garden.



Mass of Diplacus torreyi as seen in their native habitat are an inspiration to draw upon for our garden design.



Erythranthe microphylla is like a miniature version of Erythranthe guttata. This species can be found growing and blooming near seasonal seeps in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

These are just a sampling of the many Phrymacaea that can be found locally in our region of Northern California. The whole state of California has even more species. Many California native plant species work well in my new gardening scheme. Working with and arranging them naturalistically in our garden is another important component of our gardening scheme.

I hope you have enjoyed the photographs.  :)
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him stepto the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
- Henry David Thoreau

Maggi Young

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2023, 07:55:30 PM »

I hope you have enjoyed the photographs.  :)

Oh, yes, very much indeed, thank you!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Yann

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Re: February 2023 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2023, 08:04:36 PM »
thanks for sharing these photos Robert, and specialiy annuals plants, not so much grown among garden's enthusiasts.
North of France

 


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