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Author Topic: Pulsatilla  (Read 1397 times)

Catwheazle

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Pulsatilla
« on: May 16, 2020, 08:16:57 AM »
Does anyone here in the forum still have Pulsatilla integrifolia
or pulsatilla patens ssp. flavescens in culture?
Greetings
Bernd
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

Steve Garvie

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2020, 12:22:10 PM »
I have Pulsatilla patens ssp. flavescens Bernd. They are raised from wild-collected seed and flowered for the first time this year (only a couple of flowers). Not sure if I will get seed set. But the plants look promising for next year. It is slower than most other Pulsatillas.

I lost integrifolia. I know of only one other plant in Scotland but I think it may still be grown in some Nordic gardens (Tromsø? Gothenburg?).
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Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Catwheazle

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2020, 12:59:02 PM »
Hello Steve,
there seems to be no one, the Pulsatilla integrifolia longer! Can keep time alive. This also applies to Gothenburg and a few others. (The problem seems to be the winter) Nothing exactly could be found out about the reasons. Some call it "the weather" others suspect that the plant needs a very acidic environment similar to the Cypripedium acaule, which is almost impossible to cultivate without vinegar water. (70% granite and 30% peat).
It would be nice if the individual experiences could be brought together here.
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

Steve Garvie

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2020, 01:45:54 PM »
I visited a friend a couple of weeks before the start of the lockdown here in Scotland (end of February). He still had a single plant of integrifolia which had come through the winter in his greenhouse. That is the only plant that I know of.
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Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Catwheazle

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2020, 02:39:03 PM »
Greenhouse surprises me, but maybe that's why? Because of the origin, frost hardiness shouldn't be the problem, but there are many other factors, such as raising the ground when there are many frosts and dew phases. I mean, I would have read a sensitivity in connection with Pulsatilla. Then bare frosts versus snow cover and dry or wet winter. In the drift, there is at least no uplift, excessive moisture and frost which dry out. Please ask your friend about his watering behavior in winter.
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

Steve Garvie

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2020, 05:34:47 PM »
The plant is grown in a plunged clay pot (I’m not sure of the soil mix but I think it is very gritty (granite)). The sand plunge is kept barely moist over winter (there are Dionysias growing in the same plunge). The greenhouse is very well ventilated with wide doors at each end -kept open except in extreme weather. Rot seems to be the main killer of this species.
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Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Catwheazle

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2020, 06:47:32 PM »
Perfect !
Lot of thanks.
Greetings to your friend and thx for sharing his experiences  ;D
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

Steve Garvie

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2020, 09:52:44 PM »
Some young Pulsatilla raised from seed and flowering for their first time. Hopefully I’ll have a better display next year.
All are growing in a large, acidic, well-drained, wooden raised bed which can be covered by glass in bad weather and over the winter. Some in the household call this a coffin but fortunately the contents are still alive!  ::)

Pulsatilla ajanensis



Pulsatilla patens ssp. flavescens



Pulsatilla sugawarii

WILDLIFE PHOTOSTREAM: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rainbirder/


Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Catwheazle

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2020, 10:01:43 PM »
I'm jealous! My compliments (also to your fantastic photos elsewhere)
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

kris

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2020, 02:31:53 PM »
Amazing Pulsatillas Steve. I can grow them at my place . Here the soil is alkaline !!!
Saskatoon,Canada
-35C to +30C

Gabriela

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Re: Pulsatilla
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2020, 08:36:17 PM »
Some young Pulsatilla raised from seed and flowering for their first time. Hopefully I’ll have a better display next year.
All are growing in a large, acidic, well-drained, wooden raised bed which can be covered by glass in bad weather and over the winter. Some in the household call this a coffin but fortunately the contents are still alive!  ::)

All beautiful, P. sugawarii is particularly sweet!
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

 


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