We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019  (Read 25456 times)

bibliofloris

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
  • Country: us
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #150 on: February 14, 2019, 04:02:59 PM »
Received my seeds yesterday Im thrilled! Now, if only the snow would melt so I could start planting...

Thanks again to all the SeedEx volunteers!
Kelly
Kelly Jones
near Seattle, Washington state, USA (US zone 8b)

bibliofloris

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
  • Country: us
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #151 on: February 23, 2019, 10:55:44 PM »
Surplus seeds arrived today too! Thanks again to all the donors and volunteers!
Kelly
Kelly Jones
near Seattle, Washington state, USA (US zone 8b)

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44719
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #152 on: February 28, 2019, 11:39:36 AM »
This is of  import to Australian members -  thanks to  Jon Ballard and fermi de sousa  in Victoria, Australia for these notes.
 Jon Ballard has put together this advice for all Australian members of overseas Societies which have Seed Exchanges or order seeds from overseas sellers

"The AGS VG strongly recommends that all members check BICON before ordering seed from overseas. If you order any seed from overseas without checking that its on BICON first then all of the seed in the envelope (both allowed and not allowed) will be returned to the sender. Youll receive nothing. This is a new policy brought in by the Department of Agriculture in April 2018. They no longer destroy some seed and forward the rest to you (there are some inconsistencies occurring but on a whole seed packages are being returned to sender). Weve had multiple members reporting that their seed has been returned.

"The danger is that If the seed exchanges receive too many envelopes back they might stop sending seed to anyone in Australia. Weve already had one international society indicate that this system is becoming unworkable. Multiple commercial suppliers have already stopped sending seed to Australia because of this new way of processing imports. It is not worth the risk to jeopardise the international seed exchanges for everybody by hoping that the seed wont be checked."
 

Thank you Jon for this advice!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

Claire Cockcroft

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 496
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #153 on: March 06, 2019, 07:31:23 PM »
I am so jealous of all those who got their seeds already.  My surplus seed order arrived yesterday (March 6).  The main order has not yet arrived!

The delay is not the fault of the exchange.  I think the seeds were held up by the agricultural inspection station.
...Claire
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

bibliofloris

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
  • Country: us
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #154 on: March 10, 2019, 08:01:07 PM »
I hope the rest of your seeds make it through soon, Claire - especially now that the weather here is better for planting!
Kelly
Kelly Jones
near Seattle, Washington state, USA (US zone 8b)

Claire Cockcroft

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 496
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #155 on: March 13, 2019, 01:47:04 AM »
Many thanks for all the volunteers at the seed exchange.  My main seed distribution selections arrived today (March 12).  Most of my first choices were filled and the alternates are very welcome.

It was a long wait!
...Claire
Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington, USA  Zone 7-8

AnJo11

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 43
  • Country: fr
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #156 on: March 29, 2019, 10:25:33 AM »
I would contribute to your seed supply;
I can do that with many species, I can collect seeds from my own land, but mostly of my plants are not rocky garden plant, in the usual sense, they are growing in a rocky land, with poor draining more or less acidic soil.(shale bedrock)
I can soon collecting seeds of a half dozen species and / or varieties of cyclamen, hardy to Z7 or more, several species of hellebores and fertile hybrids of H. orientalis group, hardy minimum Z, acidic and drought tolerant, and soon afterwards seeds of paeonia mascula, from a wild local strain, apparently now extinct, and which I multiplied a lot.
And later from some other paeonias species.
Most of these seeds do not like dry storage too much, and normally I harvest only on precise demand.
I can assume a fear of storage in the fridge until your reception period, knowing that a sowing in autumn is preferable for these species.
And I can of course harvest seeds for most species on my list, without guaranteeing success for each one, not yet retired and still very busy with my job.

But I need to know what is useful and interesting to harvest, and how to proceed for the expeditions.
And conversely, how to order certain species, knowing that I usually leave France around January 15th, for a return at the beginning of March (this year, around the 15th too);
right in the period of orders and shipments of seeds ... ::)
I often collect exotic seeds during my travels, for my correspondents living in warmer regions  8)(Z9 minimum, and warmer), but this can sometimes also interest "Nordic" collectors ... let me know if it's useful that I propose that...

I have also a lot of hardy cacti, Z7 to supposed Z5.
someones could be interest some people. But most of them haven't exact ID, most of them were obtained by sowing, and re-sowing of the rare survivors, may be hybridized, the varietal purity not being my goal, (for any of my species I use that matter) but the resistance to the climatic conditions of more and more harder in my area.
Only the survivors interest me, not their pedigree, because the optics is that they can push without watering, and qyasi without human intervention once implanted ...

Idem for agavaes, but they don't give seeds yet.

My favorite breeding method is sowing, and even if I get plants in vegetative form, this remains the goal.
As soon as I have enough seeds, I sow in difficult, even terrible conditions, and only keep the dynamic survivors, which I then re-sow;
So, for exemple,  I got humilis chamaerops that laughed softly during the 2018 and 2012 cold spells, with negative T peaks close to -20 C for days, and alternates brutal freeze / thaw during weeks...
I had planted kilos of seeds, harvested from individuals surviving the cold wave of 2018, and I continue, for a veeeeery tiny percentage of survivors ...but I have a lot of ground to do these tests, that I let evolve without intervention, and that I am sometimes surprised to find years after I have forgotten them! ;D
(but these ones are realy slow growers, and still don't give seeds);

So, if you can give me some precise indications, I would be happy to contribute ...
@

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44719
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #157 on: March 29, 2019, 12:52:48 PM »
Antoine, if you  look at this  page  : https://www.srgcseed.net/seedlistarchive.asp   you will see  previous  SRGC Seed Lists and  be able to see the  range of  plants included  there.
There is  no  problem with you  offering seeds, even of  non-alpine  plants to other  forumists  in these pages.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

AnJo11

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 43
  • Country: fr
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #158 on: March 29, 2019, 07:55:20 PM »
I have been to see the last list, the offers are very varied, well beyond the rock garden.

So, I think I have a lot of plants that could interest people ...

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 44719
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: SRGC Seed Exchange No.72 2018-2019
« Reply #159 on: April 02, 2019, 11:58:39 AM »
2019 SEED DISTRIBUTION
All the seed requests have been processed and most have been posted, apart from a few USA ones awaiting their permits.   Thank you to all those who donated seed and thus made the seed exchange possible and thanks to the hundred or more volunteers who helped the three teams make it all happen.
This year we thought we had all the documentation sorted out for the Antipodes.   However, Australia then implemented a harsh blow for any member who had not checked their seed request against the acceptable list - the whole order was destroyed, not just the inadmissable taxa.  Fortunately, most of our members were diligent and received their seed.
Japan surprised everyone by suddenly refusing all seed unless accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate.   This is not difficult to obtain; however the inspector has to examine the seed in every packet closely - and charges the client for his time.   This proved to be a costly business and put seed out of the reach of most members.   Hopefully Japan may follow the example of USA and adopt a Small Lots Permit for non-commercial exchanges such as ours.
Good luck with germination and start collecting seeds to donate soon!
  Notes for  donation of  seed : https://www.srgcseed.net/seed_donations.asp

Carolyn McNab
Seed Distribution Manager
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Editor: International Rock Gardener e-magazine

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal