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Author Topic: Bearded Iris 2018  (Read 9720 times)

Véronique Macrelle

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Re: Bearded Iris 2018
« Reply #45 on: October 20, 2018, 12:34:49 PM »
if that can help to compare here is my own Iris reichenbachii (Romania) bloomed in April this year.

Rick R.

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Re: Bearded Iris 2018
« Reply #46 on: October 20, 2018, 04:48:45 PM »
There are a few that look similar that I have found, but I still think I reichenbachii.
 
Iris attica flower can look the same except it is virtually stemless, with their floral tub coming from the base of the plant. 

Iris suaveolens has the same shape.  It can easily grow straight leaves in an unnatural environment, but when grown in more austere conditions, leaves will be strongly falcate.  In my experience, suaveolens never has even close to the length of flower stem that yours does.  However reichenbachii does.  Reichenbachii is more often with a netted color pattern, too, and the mix of colors is common.  Yours is quite nice.  When I hybridize yellow with purple, I get a lot of very drab and dirty coloring.
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

Maggi Young

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Re: Bearded Iris 2018
« Reply #47 on: October 20, 2018, 05:56:32 PM »
F1 hybrids of yellow  x purple  might be  mud-coloured, Rick - but  perhaps  F2  and later generations will be  prettier?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Rick R.

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Re: Bearded Iris 2018
« Reply #48 on: October 20, 2018, 09:24:06 PM »
You're definitely right, Maggie.  As you well know, this is common practice among hybridizers.
Rick Rodich
just west of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
USDA zone 4, annual precipitation ~24in/61cm

 


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