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Author Topic: Pumice  (Read 30414 times)

Maggi Young

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2008, 07:20:03 PM »
Pretty good delivery time since you only ordered a couple of days ago, eh?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Slug Killer

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2008, 04:38:35 PM »
Yes very good service. It was sent DHL 2-3day service but I guess I was lucky as it was sent out on the Monday and I got it Tuesday. I do live next to a large DHL distribution centre, so this may have helped. Will have to order some more now as I was a short with my estimation of how much I'd need. Probably take a week to get here second time round. Usually the way.

Anthony Darby

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2008, 09:10:05 AM »
How does it compare with Seramis®?
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
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Slug Killer

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2008, 04:53:56 PM »
I've not used seramis as I could not find anywhere local and I had to order £70 worth from them direct. Will give it a go soon when I find some at a decent price.

Slug killer

Anthony Darby

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2008, 12:48:41 AM »
Thanks for the sample Dave. Will definitely be ordering some.
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
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Martin Baxendale

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2008, 10:20:10 AM »
Has anyone tried using the clay-granule cat litter stuff from Tescos in potting compost? I saw some the other day and it looked just like a much more expensive clay-granule growing medium called Moler that I used to buy for improving drainage.  The cat litter stuff is half the price, but it seems to be lightly perfumed and says on the bag that it contains an "active odour controller" (which I assume just means a chemical scent). Anyone know if this perfume is likely to harm plant roots?
Martin Baxendale, Gloucestershire, UK.

Anthony Darby

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #21 on: April 21, 2008, 01:56:48 PM »
I would assume a good rinse would remove it, perhaps with warm soapy water?
Anthony Darby, Auckland, New Zealand.
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Michael J Campbell

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2008, 06:38:01 PM »
Martin ,I tried it and it don't work, gets much too sticky just like real clay which it is, don't buy it.   

Martin Baxendale

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #23 on: April 21, 2008, 11:11:17 PM »
Martin ,I tried it and it don't work, gets much too sticky just like real clay which it is, don't buy it.   

Thanks for that advice, Michael. I was hoping the Tesco's cat litter stuff would be okay as I'm sure I read in the forum somewhere recently that it was suitable to use in composts as a substitute for Seramis or something. But the last thing I want is a load of soggy clay in my alpine troughs! So the two bags I got will go in the cat litter tray instead.

I was hoping I could sneak it onto the household shopping expenses as cat litter and then actually use it as a lightweight compost drainage additive when I replant my troughs this Spring, which I've been wanting to do for  the last three years. I can't order the much more expensive Moler or pumice grit as I've been told by my business partner and marital partner that I can't spend anything more on stuff for the garden this year as the main book distributors that we use for our small publishing business has gone into administration owing us huge amounts of money. But at least we now have a good stock of stuff for the cat to pooh on.   ;D
Martin Baxendale, Gloucestershire, UK.

tonyg

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #24 on: April 21, 2008, 11:17:23 PM »
Martin - my experience as a potter is limited but I reckon if you fire your cat litter to a high enough temperature it would then make a good compost additive.   Sounds like you should have fired the book distributors a while ago  >:(

Martin Baxendale

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #25 on: April 22, 2008, 01:02:35 AM »
Martin - my experience as a potter is limited but I reckon if you fire your cat litter to a high enough temperature it would then make a good compost additive.   Sounds like you should have fired the book distributors a while ago  >:(

I'm consoling myself with chardonnay and cheese and onion crisps. When that runs out, it'll be home-brew and cat litter.  :D
Martin Baxendale, Gloucestershire, UK.

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #26 on: April 22, 2008, 09:21:57 AM »
Hi Martin,

I'm looking for pumice as well.

I do use cat litter...but not Tesco's.

If you have an Avoncrop or other wholesaler for landscape and sports ground materials, you may find "Biosorb" this is used for soil conditioning and for animal litter.  It works very well for a seramis substitute....but I think pumice may be better for in vitro weaning.


I still do mine in almost pure Biosorb, adding about 2% pine diff for acid lovers or Beechmold for alkali..

I used to use 10" clay pots but they dry out too easily so I now use good old fishboxes..5" of biosorb with a touch of pine duff finished off with another 1.5" pure biosorb.

The biosorb retains a darker pink when moist so its easy to tell when to water.

There is also Ultrasorb and others all proprietary diatomeous(sp?) earth products....high fired clay!
Cheers, John H. Hampshire
 England, zone 8/9

Michael J Campbell

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #27 on: April 22, 2008, 02:16:31 PM »
Quote
the main book distributors that we use for our small publishing business has gone into administration owing us huge amounts of money.
Martin, I know the feeling very well, I have a copper kettle that takes pride of place on a shelf in the kitchen, full of (rubber)bounced cheques that I have been  presented with over the years during my nursery and landscaping days. Every young chap that calls to me with a good idea and looking  for advice about starting their own business gets handed the kettle ,and told to look inside and examine the contents before making a final decision. Needless to say most of their decisions are in the negative.
Kinda makes you loose faith in humanity after a while.

gote

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #28 on: April 22, 2008, 06:01:00 PM »
I am not sure whether I have posted this before but it might be important so here we go:
Cat litter is manufactured and sold for cats' private needs - not for growing plants.
This means that the seller may switch material overnight without informing anybody.
As long as the cats like it it is sold regardless of how it serves other uses.
I know a kind of cat litter sold under a couple of names that will kill most plants grown in it.
I know because we commissioned Stockholm University to test it in their labs.
No I do not remember the names and it could surface under any brand name actually.
Anyone buying cat litter in a supermarket and growing sensitive things in it is taking a great risk
Göte
 
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

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Re: Pumice
« Reply #29 on: April 22, 2008, 07:44:49 PM »
Hi

Very interesting as I was going to try some with my Cyps and see what the difference would have been over twelve months compaired to pumice. Thanks for the tip, I'll give it a miss now.

Dave

 


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