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Author Topic: The plant world of Patagonia  (Read 41729 times)

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #45 on: May 25, 2017, 03:42:09 PM »
... and here also the future corpse of Viola cotyledon.  ;D

  Both plants I got from my plant friend Gerd Stopp. A gift. But since it is only one specimen, I will never receive seeds. Very sad ... but I still enjoy it again and again.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #46 on: May 25, 2017, 03:47:38 PM »
Yesterday discovered in the cold box ... Nassauvia dusenii in bloom. I'm going crazy. ;D

gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #47 on: May 25, 2017, 05:55:52 PM »
Despite the wind, insects are plentiful in the Patagonian mountains and steppe, including butterfies, moths, flies, bees and beetle and most of the colourful flowers are insect pollinated.
The Cistanthe is not from Patagonia, but from the drier more northern areas of Chile. Many calandinias have short-lived flowers but some open each flower daily over several days. Once pollinated, flowers go over quickly.

Thank you very much Martin. Now the "mystery" is solved.
During my visit in 2013, we discussed in the group the fact we saw so few insects. Perhaps we have looked too much down instead of around us. And we have seen so many ants on flowers like the rosulate violas, obviously pollinating them during their visits.

Gerrit,
Nice to see a few South Americans in flower.
Your Junellia is J. micrantha. It occurs throughout most of Patagonia and prefers to grow in areas where the soil is wet in spring, drying out later in the year. It forms a flat mat, sometimes flowering around the edge of the mat, others with flowers over the whole mat. We need some of these well-flowered clones in cultivation. Flowers can be white, pink, or lavender in colour, usually with a dark spot at the base of the petals. For us, this grows vigorously both in pots and in raised beds outside. The prostrate stems root readily as they extend.


Thanks again. This clone is a badly flowering one. Some of the stems has been rooted rather easily indeed, where they touched the soil.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2017, 09:31:20 PM by gerrit »
Gerrit from the Netherlands
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gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #48 on: May 25, 2017, 06:03:54 PM »
Gerrit ... Viola dasyphylla lives amazingly still. Maybe because I got the good advice from Martin ... she needs a lot of light. I took three photos quickly ... I do not know how long I can still look forward to it. It has grown even a bit ... there are still miracles.  ;D ;D

The season is still young. Who knows, perhaps your little plant gets more fat on his body instead of getting taller.
Do you allow the rain falling on his head?
A real miracle would be: flowers.
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Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #49 on: May 27, 2017, 07:34:24 AM »
The season is still young. Who knows, perhaps your little plant gets more fat on his body instead of getting taller.
Do you allow the rain falling on his head?
A real miracle would be: flowers.


Gerrit ... I am surprised and grateful that this viola still lives. To dream of blossoms would be measured. 😊

She is standing under a cover of glass in the sun. She gets only little water ... rarely.

I have unfortunately no experience with this species. Maybe Martin can tell you something more ... substrate, water, location ... I would be grateful.

Thomas

gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #50 on: May 29, 2017, 11:35:33 AM »
Montiopsis sericea, raised from seed. The first flower. Let's see how it will grow.
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gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #51 on: May 29, 2017, 11:40:52 AM »

Gerrit ... I am surprised and grateful that this viola still lives. To dream of blossoms would be measured. 😊

She is standing under a cover of glass in the sun. She gets only little water ... rarely.

I have unfortunately no experience with this species. Maybe Martin can tell you something more ... substrate, water, location ... I would be grateful.

Thomas

Perhaps it should be better not under glass. Glass prevents UV if i'm right. Under an open sky, faced south, but away from any precipitation. That's my suggestion.

Rosulate violas have leathery leaves which are arranged like tiles on a roof. Maybe rain does not harm them to much. Perhaps you may cover the soil in order to keep the substrate rather dry. Rosulate violas also have taproots, to give them stability on the moving screes and find melting water streaming underneath the surface. So maybe give them a deep pot. and give them water from beneath. The most vulnerable spot is where the root begins just under the rosette. Give them enough water and do not let the soil drying out completely. In their natural habitat it seems they grow in dry soil. Mostly vulcanic sand. There are 2 types: The volcanica-group, growing in the vast steppe. and the andina group, growing in the most hostile envronment in the high mountains. I was estonished, the forst time i saw them. "How can they suvive?" But after digging a small hole in the sand, i understood. There is permanent water, also in the steppe.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2017, 03:33:29 PM by gerrit »
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shelagh

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #52 on: May 29, 2017, 02:06:20 PM »
Thomas what a lovely fern Polystichum andinum and so very like P. lemmonii which we grow and which comes from N. America.
Shelagh, Bury, Lancs.

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Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #53 on: May 29, 2017, 09:37:15 PM »
Perhaps it should be better not under glass. Glass prevents UV if i'm right. Under an open sky, faced south, but away from any precipitation. That's my suggestion.

Rosulate violas have leathery leaves which are arranged like tiles on a roof. Maybe rain does not harm them to much. Perhaps you may cover the soil in order to keep the substrate rather dry. Rosulate violas also have taproots, to give them stability on the moving screes and find melting water streaming underneath the surface. So maybe give them a deep pot. and give them water from beneath. The most vulnerable spot is where the root begins just under the rosette. Give them enough water and do not let the soil drying out completely. In their natural habitat it seems they grow in dry soil. Mostly vulcanic sand. There are 2 types: The volcanica-group, growing in the vast steppe. and the andina group, growing in the most hostil envronment in the high mountains. I was estonished, the forst time i saw them. "How can they suvive?" But after digging a small hole in the sand, i understood. There is permanent water, also in the steppe.






Gerrit ... thank you for the information. I have now poured the pots into large pots and filled them with sand. And then water. Let's see how they develop.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #54 on: May 29, 2017, 09:41:01 PM »
... a very beautiful Fern, Shelagh.  Thank you for showing.

gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #55 on: May 30, 2017, 07:55:28 AM »
Montiopsis sericea a day later.
Gerrit from the Netherlands
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gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #56 on: May 30, 2017, 08:06:21 AM »
Raised from Chileflora seed this Calceolaria sp. I am not 100% sure, but i think it is Calceolaria pallida.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 08:10:43 AM by gerrit »
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gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #57 on: June 01, 2017, 04:59:30 PM »
Perezia linearis provides each year only few flowers.

Not Perezia linearis, but Perezia recurvata (probably subsp recurvata.) With many thanks to Martin Sheader.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2017, 08:56:41 PM by gerrit »
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gerrit

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #58 on: June 01, 2017, 05:06:27 PM »
I already posted this perezia in another thread.

Now I have found the name (maybe???) Perezia pedicularidfolia.

Is there anybody who may confirm this?

Not Perezia pedicularidfolia but Leucheria lithospermifolia. Determination by Martin Sheader. Thanks a lot Martin!


580774-0
« Last Edit: June 02, 2017, 06:03:43 AM by gerrit »
Gerrit from the Netherlands
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Martin Sheader

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #59 on: June 01, 2017, 07:02:51 PM »
Hi Gerrit,
The perezias can be very confusing. Flower colour is quite variable.
Your Perezia linearis seems to be one of the many forms of P. recurvata  probably ssp. recurvata. The leaves of P. linearis are smoother with a margin of very fine hairs.
Your P. pedicularidifolia is Leucheria lithospermifolia. Perezia flowers are usually blue or white and have projecting styles. The calyx of P. pedicularidifolia is quite diffrent - see image below.

 


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