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Author Topic: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand  (Read 139556 times)

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #60 on: April 13, 2017, 10:37:57 AM »
... the flower is only a few millimeters , but still beautiful.
Leucopogon suaveolens from the South Island.

Now known as Acrothamnus colensoi. It looks good with berries on as well.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #61 on: April 13, 2017, 11:15:46 AM »
We found this unusual Acaena on a field trip to Mt Benger last Saturday;

Acaena tesca - the seed heads are really distinctive and unlikely to be mistaken for anything else. The plant is not well known and is found only in the Central Otago Ranges.
573621-0

573623-1

573625-2

There were gentians everywhere. The local species is Gentianella serotina

573627-3

Finally in the bogs we found Montitega dealbata (formerly known as Cyathodes pumila) and often confused with Pentachondra pumila which it superficially resembles.

573629-4
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #62 on: April 14, 2017, 08:48:02 PM »
Now known as Acrothamnus colensoi. It looks good with berries on as well.


This is the first picture of Acrothamnus colensoi with berries, which I see. Great. I am already glad about the few flowers on my specimen. Probably a pollinator is missing for these tiny flowers, but they only show their true beauty when they are enlarged.
The mother plant in the Arctic Alpine Garden in Chemnitz has never blossomed. So feel good with me and show a second flower in autumn. :)

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #63 on: April 15, 2017, 03:01:04 PM »
Thomas,
... desperation is a word I would use only if I were stranded in a thicket of them.

(Attachment Link)

David, I saw today a large specimen of Aciphylla aurea. It is  in the botanical garden of Adorf.
I can understand you now ... very sharp ... but still nice.

Thomas
« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 03:16:27 PM by Leucogenes »

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #64 on: April 15, 2017, 03:18:01 PM »
 ... the Montitega dealbata shown I find particularly beautiful. From Pentachondra pumila I also have three small plants. But they have not yet blossomed ... it can take a few more years. But also she likes me and I have time.  :)

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #65 on: April 24, 2017, 01:49:14 AM »
Hello Thomas,

The Aciphylla in the Adorf  botanical garden is more likely to be Aciphylla subflabellata, an uncommon, tussock grassland species that does not reach the alpine zone. I have attached some pictures of this species for comparison.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #66 on: April 24, 2017, 11:10:46 AM »
Hello David,

Thanks for the correction. Unfortunately, there are some false signs in botanical gardens. I would not have known it ... I have no comparison.

It's good to know a specialist ...   :)
« Last Edit: April 24, 2017, 11:12:30 AM by Leucogenes »

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #67 on: April 24, 2017, 12:19:07 PM »
Yes, a lot of plants in botanical collections are mis-identified especially outside the country of origin. Frequently plants in collections are hybrids of garden origin which can make positive identification more difficult.

Here is the real Aciphylla aurea

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #68 on: April 28, 2017, 08:11:28 PM »
If i compare both Aciphylla images, i can see a difference. A. aurea has slightly wider leaves ... or?  Both types I find beautiful. Philippe also showed on the first page a beautiful picture of A.subflabellata. I had until last year a small A. aurea ... unfortunately died. :'(

My favorites are the small Aciphylla species. For example, A. monroi, A. simplex, A. spedenii, and A. congesta. I know them but only from pictures ... only A. monroi I have in the Alpinum ... but still small.

Another picture of today ... Chionohebe densiflora

Thomas
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 08:19:21 PM by Leucogenes »

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #69 on: April 29, 2017, 07:21:38 AM »
Hello David,

Since my A. aurea unfortunately died last year, I have no current photo. I would be interested if it really was this kind. I have unfortunately only two photos found in the archive ... once totally and at Gentianella saxosa bottom left.
Maybe you can identify it ... is only for my protocol. :)

Thanks and greetings
Thomas
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 07:26:49 AM by Leucogenes »

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #70 on: April 30, 2017, 02:15:46 AM »
Hello Thomas,

The plant you have shown in your photo does not look like Aciphylla aurea to me. It is perhaps Aciphylla scott-thomsonii, a larger species with glaucous leaves. Aciphylla aurea is generally quite golden hence its name. There are several large Aciphylla species in southern New Zealand. The ones I encounter most frequently are Aciphylla aurea, Aciphylla scott-thomsonii, Aciphylla glaucescens, Aciphylla horrida, Aciphylla aff horrida "lomondii". They are all very large plants and the inflorescence of the largest species (Aciphylla scott-thomsonii) can be up to 3 metres in height. They are not really suitable for rock gardens. The larger species are found in lower altitude tussock grassland and shrubland where they are conspicuous element of the vegetation. The smaller high alpine species are very attractive and make good rock garden plants. A. monroi is the smallest species.  Many of the small species are quite localised in their distribution and are sometimes hard to identify in the field. A. simplex and A. dobsonii are both species found at high altitude here in Otago. These two can form cushions up to 1 metre across and grow on very exposed boulder fields on the tops of some of the mountain ranges.

I am posting another photo of A. aurea which shows the leaves in more detail.
Also a picture of Chionohebe densiflora (now called Veronica densiflora). You have done well to get this plant to flower. I have found I can grow it but you need to keep taking fresh cuttings as it seems to die back rather than continue growing.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #71 on: April 30, 2017, 07:13:10 AM »
Hello David,

Now I am not so sad that I lost this Acyphilla. She was very nice, but probably too big. Again, it shows that much is offered wrong here. However, it was the only time that I could ever buy an Acyphilla in Germany and I was very happy about it. I thank you for the correction and the helpful information. I hope that my A. monroi survive.

My Veronica densiflora is now 7 or 8 years old and it is a back and forth with this plant. Sometimes she looks like dead and a few weeks later she recuperates. But I will make a few cuttings today. In your photo (breathtakingly beautiful) I am surprised by the great red color of the foliage. I just knew the green version so far. But I have heard that this species also occurs in Australia. Maybe my clone is from there. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Best regards
Thomas

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #72 on: April 30, 2017, 10:04:05 AM »
Hello Thomas,
Here is a picture of Aciphylla scott-thomsonii with one of my botanical friends beside it for comparison. As you can see it is not a rock garden plant. It is a very striking plant but not a good garden subject because of its spines which can inflict painful wounds.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Leucogenes

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #73 on: May 01, 2017, 09:53:03 PM »
Hello David,

The Aciphylla scott-thomsonii looks really dangerous. Ideal as a fence around a prison.

A new correction or confirmation ...

The following Leptinella I got with the name Leptinella albida. I can find under this name but nothing on the Internet.
It looks like a L. pectinata ... but much smaller and very strongly hairy. I hope you can identify them.

Thank you
Thomas

David Lyttle

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Re: alpine and subalpine Plants from New Zealand
« Reply #74 on: May 01, 2017, 11:03:17 PM »

The following Leptinella I got with the name Leptinella albida. I can find under this name but nothing on the Internet.
It looks like a L. pectinata ... but much smaller and very strongly hairy. I hope you can identify them.

Thank you
Thomas

Yes, it is Leptinella albida. Here is the plant growing in the wild.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

 


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