We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: "Grochar"  (Read 3274 times)

Alan_b

  • 'finder of the light'
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3976
  • Country: england
"Grochar"
« on: March 20, 2016, 07:58:27 AM »
"Grochar" is the name of a range of products which "all contain biochar, seaweed, wormcasts and mycorrhizl fungi" and are marketed by a company called Carbon Gold Limited.  'Biochar' is a form of charcoal used as as soil improver.  Monty Don was using something like this on Gardeners World last week (without mentioning the trade name) and it has been credited with doing miraculous things like preventing ash trees succumbing to the dieback disease.  Has anybody tried it? 
Almost in Scotland.

johnralphcarpenter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2639
  • Country: england
  • Plantaholic
Re: "Grochar"
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2016, 10:36:18 AM »
I use the general purpose compost and the seed compost to good effect. I first saw it at Great Dixter, where they recommend it, and they know a thing or two there!
Ralph Carpenter near Ashford, Kent, UK. USDA Zone 8 (9 in a good year)

diamondhill2012

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Country: gb
Re: "Grochar"
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2016, 09:12:37 PM »
Hi Alan_b I have used Carbon Gold's biochar soil improver. I met Craig Sams at Great Dixter the founder of Carbon Gold, and we had a really good chat. It is a great product and I've had some fantastic results with  mine and my clients gardens. With one client I used it on their herbaceous border one year after it was planted. The second year the growth and vitality of the plants was outstanding. As well as being fabulous for the plants, it remains in the ground and helps with the carbon cycle to reduce C02 in the atmosphere. Do make sure you're using Peat free soil!! Good luck!

Regelian

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 943
  • Country: de
  • waking escapes the dream
Re: "Grochar"
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2016, 10:50:44 AM »
An interesting topic.  What is the principle behind carbon in the soil.  I use it a great deal for my aquariums and it is later added to my garden, along with zeolite, another aquarium by-product.

Ash is clearly a source of potassium for the plants, but carbon is a binder and pulls various organics into its matrix.  Bacteria can then use them, but I've not thought plants would make much use of it. 

j.
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

rob krejzl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 535
  • One-Eyed About Plants
Re: "Grochar"
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2016, 11:15:51 AM »
Google on Terra Preta.
Southern Tasmania

USDA Zone 8/9

Regelian

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 943
  • Country: de
  • waking escapes the dream
Re: "Grochar"
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2016, 11:49:02 AM »
Thanks, Rob.  I had already and found some basic infos in German, but no real research as to what parts of the biospere are being supported and why.  Interesting recipes for making it yourself, simply not much researched infos.  I'm sure they are out there, just not top-line for Google.  I'll report back, as this is what interests me.  The why, not just the product.

cheers,
J.
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal