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Author Topic: Horticultural/Alpine Grit  (Read 13284 times)

ian mcdonald

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2015, 07:29:59 PM »
I use chick grit in seed compost and also as a topping in seed pots to keep moss and liverwort at bay. Reasonably priced at some garden centres or larger pet suppliers. Larger shops that is, not pets. Hope you get accommodation soon Matt.

Matt T

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2015, 07:33:27 PM »
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...will find a link and post it here in 5 mins.
Lawrence, you can find some useful info here

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Hope you get accommodation soon Matt.
Thank you, Ian.
Matt Topsfield
Isle of Benbecula, Western Isles where it is mild, windy and wet! Zone 9b

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Lawrence

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2015, 07:53:55 PM »
Thanks Matt, appreciate your help, looks an interesting link and good luck with the accomodation as well
Lawrence

Maggi Young

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2015, 09:52:29 AM »
 Just for interest - the grit we use is granite  and measures approx  6  to 8mm. We use that in the mix and as a top dressing.  It is the type sold in Scotland as "harling" grit - that is to say, for rendering the outside of buildings.
Good stuff!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Lawrence

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2015, 10:17:03 AM »
Thanks Maggi
Sounds like the grit I am using should be fine then as it is of a similar size if not smaller. The suggestion of using bark to increase the AFP, might be the way to go, a local garden centre sells a good quality composted bark, but it has a little nitrogen added to compensate for the nutrient loss incurred  during the break down in the bark, not sure if the small amount of nitrogen will be detrimental to the alpines though

ArdfearnAli

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2015, 01:54:17 PM »
I agree with the lowering of AFP by the addition off finer grit and sharp sand. Unless a large quantity is added will reduce the AFP by filling in the air spaces. We use a peat bark perlite compost commercially which we mix ourselves. We are looking for a sphagnum peat with an AFP of around 16%. We use perlite to keep the weight down for transportation around the nursery and also to shows etc but grit around the 5mm mark will do exactly the same. We get a local grit in Inverness from our sand/gravel quarry which is 6mm natural which contains most at 5mm but some slightly smaller and some slightly larger. I get it by the trailer load at around 25-00 per ton. For finer grit for sowing seeds etc we use concreting sand which we dry and then sieve to remove the fines leaving a grit around 2mm which is ideal for seed sowing etc.

Alasdair

ChrisB

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Re: Horticultural/Alpine Grit
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2015, 06:41:13 AM »
What a lot of work Alisdair!  Hadn't thought of sieving concreting sand before, must try this!
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

 


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