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Author Topic: Primula- January 2008  (Read 11619 times)

Brian Ellis

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2008, 01:29:34 PM »
From http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/p/primro69.html

In the centre of the pin-eyed flowers there is only the green knob of the stigma, looking like a pin's head, whereas in the centre of the thrum-eyed flowers there are five anthers, in a ring round the tube, but no central knob. Farther down the tube, there are in the pin-eyed flowers five anthers hanging on to the wall of the corolla tube, while in the thrum-eyed, at this same spot, is the stigma knob.

Hope that helps Kathrine
Brian Ellis, Brooke, Norfolk UK. altitude 30m Mintemp -8C

Katherine J

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2008, 02:32:03 PM »
Yes, Brian, thanks a lot. That's exactly what I said, and it's clear for me now (should have thought of "pin's head" ::))
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
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Tony Willis

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2008, 03:30:44 PM »
Gerd not a special liking for crocus its just that they are flowering now and so I can post the pictures.Its a special liking for anything that grows!
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

Gerdk

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2008, 08:40:15 PM »
Yes, Brian, thanks a lot. That's exactly what I said, and it's clear for me now (should have thought of "pin's head" ::))

Sorry Kathrine,
I am the source for the confusion and mixed the terms. My plant has pin-eyed flowers (see picture) and it needs the thrum-eyed equivalent.

Gerd 
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Katherine J

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2008, 12:00:51 PM »
Gerd,
I really didn' want to pick at you  ;D it was for my lighting up.  ;D ;D
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
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Gerdk

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2008, 02:47:00 PM »
Gerd,
I really didn' want to pick at you  ;D it was for my lighting up.  ;D ;D

Absolutely no reason to apologize, on the contrary I am glad to see my mistake  :)

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

ian mcenery

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2008, 05:23:32 PM »
Here is one I have that will be planted out in a new "Himalayan bed" that I am making. Its cold doesn't get much sun and I've got my fingers crossed. Primula nana alba
Ian McEnery Sutton Coldfield  West Midlands 600ft above sea level

Lesley Cox

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2008, 06:19:27 PM »
That's a really nice little primula Ian. Rather like P. edgeworthii alba but presumably smaller.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

David Nicholson

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2008, 06:22:02 PM »
Here is one I have that will be planted out in a new "Himalayan bed" that I am making. Its cold doesn't get much sun and I've got my fingers crossed. Primula nana alba

Ian, could you say a little more please about the soil mix you are using in your new bed?
David Nicholson
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ian mcenery

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2008, 11:09:54 PM »
Lesley you right it is a little smaller than edgworthii alba and probably tricky outside- this is in a cold frame at present with a collection of plants going into my new bed

David I have always wanted to grow asiatic primulas and some other high alpine dwellers but have had only limited success here in the midlands where summers can be hot and winters cold. I have only had real success with P. petiolaris which I find easy if divided each year however many of my petiolarid primulas  have clung onto life only because they have mostly been in intensive care. This means that I should really consider whether these are suitable plants for my situation. The new bed sounds very grand but isn't it is an old plunge bed used for bringing on stock plants which had not been particularly successful. Until I had been to Bhutan last year I had always considered this space at the side of my house to have a cold and windy aspect and having too little  sun. What I found when at altitude in the mountains trhat the conditions seemed to approximate those of this place so here goes. What I am doing is an experiment and this may not work. The soil mix I am trying is based on a tip I got from Rachel Lever of Aberconwy Nursery and she recomended rotted turf for asiatic primulas. If I had not seen many of the plants we all covet growing in turf I might have thought this strange but it makes sense now. So I bought some turf and have mixed this with my own compost (from the heap) plus some Cambark fine. The mix isn't scientific I like to feel that  the stuff is right. Also Ron McBeath suggested that some asiatics like their root run restricted so I might add some slate to do this.

Like all gardening we travel in hope (and as the cynic would say die of despair). If anyone is interested I will post progress of this bed (a big word for a small square of compost surrounded by concrete blocks. If it works then I will make it prettier.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2008, 11:12:12 PM by ian mcenery »
Ian McEnery Sutton Coldfield  West Midlands 600ft above sea level

Carlo

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2008, 11:18:11 PM »
Ian,

I'd love to hear about the continued evolution (and success, for sure) of your new bed. Please keep us posted....
Carlo A. Balistrieri
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Lesley Cox

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2008, 03:18:09 AM »
I just had a note from John Lonsdale saying that P. edgeworthii alba is the OLD name for P. nana alba.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Katherine J

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2008, 07:54:56 AM »
Ian,

I'd love to hear about the continued evolution (and success, for sure) of your new bed. Please keep us posted....

I would like it too, Ian.

Sorry, what is the "Cambark" (I know bark, but what is Cam?  ??? ???)
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
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David Shaw

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2008, 12:47:04 PM »
Kathrine, 'Cambark' is the trade name of a commercially available composted bark. Many of us have forgone the use of peat, for conservationist reasons, and buy ground (fine) composted bark as a replacement humus element for our composts.
I use leaf mould as first choice but when I run out I buy composted bark. Many growers swear by Cambark but, personally, have found it no better or worse than many others on the market.

Ian, your Himalayan bed sounds very interesting. Good luck with it and please keep us updated on its progress.
David Shaw, Forres, Moray, Scotland

Katherine J

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Re: Primula- January 2008
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2008, 12:53:08 PM »
Thank you, David.

Many of us have forgone the use of peat, for conservationist reasons, and buy ground (fine) composted bark as a replacement humus element for our composts.
I know that, and I agree with that. What do you think about coconut fibers?
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
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