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Author Topic: Bernese Oberland  (Read 6439 times)

alistairsmac

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Bernese Oberland
« on: January 01, 2008, 10:44:40 PM »
I visited the Grindelwald region in September 2007 and came across a few plants with which I was not altogether familiar.

I had a look at the Collins Wild Flowers book and I think the first one is Gentianella Campestris although it might be G Autumnalis.  The next two pictures are of the same plant which I thought was a Gentian but the only plant with fringed petals in the book was Gentianella Ciliata.  The fourth photo I can't match to anything in the book and I saw only the one plant during our six days of walking.

The plants were growing at 2000 - 2300 metres or so.

Could someone tell me if I am on the right track with the first two and identify the third one please.

Thanks.

Alistair.

PS  This is my first ever post so I hope I've got it right!

Katherine J

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2008, 08:01:35 AM »
The fourth photo I can't match to anything in the book and I saw only the one plant during our six days of walking.
It looks to me like Saxifraga sedoides ???

Anyway, welcome to the Forum Alistair!
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ranunculus

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2008, 08:48:10 AM »
Hi Kathrine and Alistair,
Can I add my own 'Welcome' Alistair....you will get so much pleasure from your time on this site?
Sorry, but I don't think that your plant is Sax' sedoides, the foliage of that particular saxifrage is slightly more succulent.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Katherine J

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2008, 09:30:17 AM »
And this?
What do you think, Cliff?
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
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http://gardenonbalcony.blogspot.com

ranunculus

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2008, 12:28:03 PM »
Hi Kathrine,
I'm fairly certain that your lovely images ARE of Sax' sedoides (from the Dolomites presumably), but whilst the flowers look right in Alistair's image, the foliage does not.  Where are you Franz and your vastly superior knowledge of the region?
I have been studying various Moehringias, Minuartias and other Sax's, but without success.
Has anyone seen Sax' sedoides with this variable foliage?
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

tonyg

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2008, 03:51:15 PM »
Cliff - is it possible that the plant in Alastairs pic is Sax sedoides with 'out of character' foliage?  It is growing in what looks like a shady place against an overhanging rock while Kathrine has shown us a plant in an exposed site.

Lvandelft

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2008, 04:13:09 PM »
Sorry, but I don't think that your plant is Sax' sedoides, the foliage of that particular saxifrage is slightly more succulent.

According to the leaves my first thought was an Achillea, but the flowers are not.
Possibly it is a Saxifraga. I have seen Sax sedoides very often in the Eastern Alps, but never saw plants like this.
I presume however, these were growing on the very northern side of a rock and kept fairly dry under this rock.
Luit van Delft
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Sadly Luit died on 14th October 2016 - happily we can still enjoy his posts to the Forum

johanneshoeller

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2008, 06:04:03 PM »
Tony, I can agree your opinion. Your Austrian Saxifrages like moschata or azoides have so many different foliages which depend on the altitude and the locations where they grow.

hans
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hadacekf

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2008, 06:34:33 PM »
Alistair,
The names of the Gentians are correct. The plant of your last picture grows in shade. I do not know it.

Kathrine,
Please, know you where the plant (Saxifraga) grows? That is necessary for the ID!
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ranunculus

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2008, 10:14:53 PM »
Alistair,
Would it be possible to post a blown-up portion of the original image please....you have certainly caused some discussion with your very first posting....keep up the good work.
Many thanks,
Cliff


Thanks for responding so quickly Franz!
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Katherine J

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2008, 10:42:38 AM »
Kathrine,
Please, know you where the plant (Saxifraga) grows? That is necessary for the ID!

Grüß Dich, Franz!
"My" Saxifraga was photographed (as Cliff has touched the spot very well) in the Dolomites, near Grödner Pass.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2008, 04:58:20 PM by Kathrine J »
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
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hadacekf

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2008, 06:17:06 PM »
Kathrine,
Saxifraga sedoides a variable species with 3 subspecies. Apart from variation clearly induced by difference in habit, this species varies also in the number of flowers on a stem. The presence or absence of leaves on flowering stems. The size and shape of the petals and, to some extent, in the frequency of lobed leaves. Since you saw this plant in Dolomites, it is Saxifraga sedoides subsp. sedoides.
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

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Katherine J

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2008, 06:30:00 PM »
Franz,
thank you very very much for this detailed description!!!
I usually identify the plants with the help of "The Alpine Plants of Britain and Europe" by Ch. Grey-Wilson and also using the excellent site: http://flora.nhm-wien.ac.at/ (with a little help of dictionary :))
« Last Edit: January 03, 2008, 06:48:12 PM by Kathrine J »
Kata Jozsa - Budapest, Hungary
Zone 6

http://gardenonbalcony.blogspot.com

alistairsmac

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2008, 08:06:54 PM »
Dear All,

Thanks for all the comments and suggestions.

I've tried a bit of cropping and enlargement of the ? Saxifraga sedoides.  As far as I recollect the plant was growing under an overhanging boulder facing approx SW.

Regards to all.

Alistair.

ranunculus

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Re: Bernese Oberland
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2008, 08:30:30 PM »
Many thanks Alistair and all,
The images are quite helpful and might assist to provide an answer?
One VERY significant addition to the puzzle is that Sax' sedoides is NOT listed in the magnificent (and very thorough) Flora Helvetica.  From the enlarged image the foliage looks even less like the succulent almost fleshy little leaves of S.sedoides we have encountered in the Dolomites, but those flowers are still very convincing?

Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

 


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