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Author Topic: Anemone nemorosa  (Read 30009 times)

annew

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #60 on: June 04, 2007, 09:15:41 AM »
Here is an identification problem. I obtained the two anemones below as A = Vestal and B = Flore Pleno. A has a ring of stamens around the pom-pom in the middle, B is much later flowering and doesn't have obvious stamens. Can anyone confirm (or otherwise) the ID?
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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Susan Band

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #61 on: June 04, 2007, 10:08:18 AM »
I would say they are both vestal. The problem is that the flowers can change especially if they have been disturbed. You might find next year they are different again. They are mixed up in the trade a lot.
Susan Band, Pitcairn Alpines, ,PERTH. Scotland


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annew

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #62 on: June 05, 2007, 09:43:39 AM »
I don't think so, Susan. I've had them both for over 20yrs, and they've been in their current positions for 10. Also the 'flore pleno' never displays its stamens as does 'Vestal', and always begins to flower after 'vestal' is almost over. Hmmmm..
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Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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zephirine

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #63 on: November 07, 2007, 05:28:07 AM »
I have received from Matthias Thomsen, in Germany, a small rhizome of a fantastic A. nemerosa which is a stable, double green form. Much better than bracteata plena.
Here are 2 pics he sent me of his plant, which he names A. nemerosa 'Sammerberg'.
Another  related plant that I am extremely fond of, is the cross between anemone nemerosa and anemone ranunculoides : the daintiest pale and soft yellow you could dream of...
Zephirine
« Last Edit: November 07, 2007, 06:51:11 AM by zephirine »
Between Lyon and Grenoble/France -1500 ft above sea level - USDA zone 7B

annew

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #64 on: November 07, 2007, 08:35:26 AM »
The hybrid is a favourite of mine too, Zephirine. I have it under 3 different names - x lipsiensis, x seemanii and 'Pallida'. Maybe someone can tell us which is correct.
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Joakim B

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #65 on: November 07, 2007, 09:42:15 AM »
Nice anemones :)
The wild cross is x lipsiensis and exists for example in Sweden where it is known under the name "svavelsippa" sulfur anemone would be the English translation. I do not know what the name is for an artificial cross of it.

Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

gote

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #66 on: November 07, 2007, 10:17:56 AM »
I have been trying to collect Anemone nemorosa and its close relatives for some years. It started by finding my grandfather's robinsoniana in the woods. I will try to post pictures but I cannot do it today   :( 
My experience is just as has been pointed out previously.
Some of them vary from year to year. Some are probably mis-named.
The worst offenders are the pink ones. I have many clones of nemorosa on my premises and I sometimes try to move pink ones into the garden but they usually turn white. I have received pink named ones from others and they are not more pink than my native ones. A REAL pink one is what I would like to see like the one posted by Bjarne? last year.
Most of the blues are very very similar.
I have had blue eyes two years. It had no blue eye but the shape was right.
I have ranuncloides plena and semiplena and the only difference I can see is the label.
I have monstrosa and bracteata plena and they differ more from year to year than between themselves. I wonder whether they in reality have mycoplasma infection.
This is a good topic today. It is snowing
Göte
 
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

Carlo

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #67 on: November 07, 2007, 11:31:08 AM »
x seemanii is a synonym for x lipsiensis. I don't think I've heard 'Pallida' being used for it. NYBG grew a nice clump of it at the base of a black oak in the rock garden...
Carlo A. Balistrieri
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Susan Band

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #68 on: November 07, 2007, 02:05:17 PM »
there are 2 forms of 'x seemanii/x lipsiensis/pallida' going around, i have or did have both of them, one is much paler than the other with darker foliage and is later/earlier? than the other.I think the paler one is often refered to as Pallida. I also heard but I don't know if it is true that x seemanii and x lipsiensis are the reverse cross of each other.
Susan Band, Pitcairn Alpines, ,PERTH. Scotland


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zephirine

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #69 on: November 07, 2007, 03:52:55 PM »
I had never heard of either of the 3 names for this nemerosa x ranunculoides  cross, which had (so far) made my life simpler!  ;D

I have similar experience regarding pink ones from our woodland (they are nearly invasive in N/E France!), emerging disappointedly white in my garden the next year....
I guess the quality of the soil (acidic, alkaline, all kinds of in-betweens)has a large influence on the colour: the more acidic, the more colourful they seem to be. And, alas, my soil is slightly alkaline, hence with less intense colouring! :(
Did you notice similar (apparent) link?
The only nemerosa which I had problems to get settled in my garden is 'Vestal'.
I hope the 3rd try will be the good one : it did bloom last spring, which makes me hope it will return...
Zephirine
Between Lyon and Grenoble/France -1500 ft above sea level - USDA zone 7B

gote

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #70 on: November 08, 2007, 05:14:02 PM »
No Zephirine,
I have the same alkalinity everywhere so it is not that.
I guess that
A: They just vary from year to year.
B: I feed them too well and the pink sometimes is s stress symptom.
You could have luck with one - I hope I will have.


The cross ranuncloides x nemorosa is not VERY uncommon when they grow together. For this reason, a number of slightly different crosses have been brought into gardens. It seems to me that the three names should be regarded as synonyms - One of the names should be the correct one according to the rules but I do not know which. If we want to distinguish different clones we should give them cultivar names.
Göte
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

Maggi Young

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #71 on: November 08, 2007, 05:26:03 PM »
Anemone x lipsiensis'Pallida' is a form which was awarded and AGM from the RHS Joint Rock Committee. See here for a page on this plant :
http://www.rhs.org.uk/WhatsOn/gardens/rosemoor/archive/rosemoorpom06mar.asp
you will see that is is described as a "vigorous hybrid between A. nemorosa and A. ranunculoides "
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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