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Author Topic: Anemone nemorosa  (Read 30020 times)

Bjarne

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2006, 08:10:17 AM »
Lovely picture Hannelotte  :) Here are a very pink flower I found last year, but it is in the end of the flowering period… I have not seen it newly out.

« Last Edit: December 19, 2006, 08:23:38 AM by Bjarne »
Bjarne Oddane
Jaeren, Southwest Norway

Joakim B

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2006, 11:19:01 AM »
What lovely ones You have found Bjarne and Hannelotte.
The Stockholm pink is better than most found in the woods, but the one Bjarne found was the pinkest I have seen ever.
Maybe there are pinker but I have not seen them. I am far from an expert, but looked a bit for pink ones in the woods.
Bjarne did you get part of the plant home? I presume the A. Nemorosa is not protected more than that You will need the permission of the land owner. At least that is the rule in Sweden.
Good luck with the plant if it is in the wood or if it is under more control :)

Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

Bjarne

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #17 on: December 19, 2006, 04:57:21 PM »
Yes, a plant is now in my garden  ;D
« Last Edit: December 19, 2006, 06:43:57 PM by Maggi Young »
Bjarne Oddane
Jaeren, Southwest Norway

Joakim B

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2006, 10:28:35 PM »
Well done!
If You took the whole plant You can transfer some back to the woods after thay have grown in the garden and become many more.
Then there is possibility for nature to take the next steps with this plant. Imagine a double version of this!!! Almost like the Japanese hepaticas!!?? Are You going to try to mix it with any of the doubles or multipetals You have?

Good luck and hopfully it grows well for You.

Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

mark smyth

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2006, 10:52:53 PM »
very nice and an excellent find
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
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Hkind

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2006, 07:55:52 AM »
Bjarne,

It is lovely! Please report in spring how pink it is when the flowers start blooming.
Hannelotte in Sweden

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Paddy Tobin

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2006, 01:47:49 PM »
Bjarne,

The pink-coloured Anemone nemerosa is certainly an excellent colour to have sourced. I cannot recall seeing such a strong coloured variation previously.

For you it is one to treasure as you found it yourself. May it grow well and increase and always bring happiness.

Paddy
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

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Bjarne

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2006, 06:23:35 PM »
Thank you all for the nice comments  :)  This plant was not the only pink plant, so it is still some in the nature. Yes i will try to mix it with other Anemone nemorosa in my garden. But I don’t think any of my doubles are fertile...
Bjarne Oddane
Jaeren, Southwest Norway

Olga Bondareva

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2006, 07:37:16 PM »
Bjarne
Fantastic color! Wish it was the same next spring!

Hannelotte
I’ve never seen A. uralensis or A. caerulea. Probably the last I saw at Elena’s garden. And A. nemorosa is always white here. You are happy finding so colored varieties.

 
Olga Bondareva, Moscow, Zone 3

razvan chisu

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2007, 08:32:04 AM »
Hello
Does anyone have access to Journal of Japanese Botany Vol.79 , 2004? I am interested in the following article, which deals with Anemone Svetlana Ziman, Carl S. Keener, Yuichi Kadota, Elena Bulakh, Olga Tsarenko and Bryan E. Dutton :
A Taxonomic Revision of Anemone L. Subgenus Anemonanthea (DC.) Juz. sensu lato (Ranunculaceae)

Also does anyone grow: Anemone nemorosa ssp. altaica?
Razvan
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Hkind

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2007, 12:17:02 PM »
I grow A. nem. altaica - some from Siberia and some from Japan ('pseudo-altaica'). None of the roots have flowered yet.
Hannelotte in Sweden

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Joakim B

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2007, 01:02:07 PM »
Razvan I do not have acces to that Journal, but I found some interesting articles from a group of Holderegger.
They have studied central European Anemone nemorosa and seen that the A.N is much more fertile when crossed with an other plant than with it self, but there is sometimes seed of the selfings as well. As a result the genetic closenes is just around the plant and more than 50 cm away there is not more close DNA than 150m.

Maybe this will influence how the breeding will be done.

So far I have only read the abstracts but I think the articles will be interesting.

Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

razvan chisu

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2007, 11:40:43 AM »
Dear Joakim
Could you give me the exact particulars of that article? The title, authors, journal?
Thanks
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Joakim B

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2007, 01:47:19 PM »
Razvan I can later post links to the abstracts and if You send Your email in a private message I might be able to get the articles
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

Joakim B

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Re: Anemone nemorosa
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2007, 10:02:14 PM »
Here are the articles and their abstracts.
Title
Estimation of the relative importance of sexual and vegetative reproduction in the clonal woodland herb Anemone nemorosa
Author
Holderegger, Rolf; Stehlik, Ivana; Schneller, J. Jakob
Abstract

Abstract Anemone nemorosa is a perennial rhizomatous plant of European woodlands. The "probability of clonal identity" method estimated the relative proportion of sexual to vegetative reproduction in this species to be 4.4% from allozyme genotype distributions. This result is congruent with investigations on the germination, short-term demography, population genetics, and breeding system of this species, and supports the hypothesis that even low levels of seedling recruitment can maintain considerable intrapopulational genetic diversity.

Keyword
Key words Anemone nemorosa . Clonal identity . Repeated seedling recruitment . Sexual reproduction . Vegetative reproduction
Magazine
Oecologia
Publisher
Springer
ISSN
00298549
År
1998
Volym
117
Nummer
1-2
Page
105-107
Titel
Spatial Genetic Structure and Clonal Diversity of Anemone nemorosa in Late Successional Deciduous Woodlands of Central Europe
Författare
Ivana Stehlik; Rolf Holderegger
Abstract
1 We tested whether established populations in similar environmental conditions exhibit similar or varying spatial genetic structures by comparing populations of the long-lived species Anemone nemorosa from a number of late successional deciduous woodlands in Central Europe. We discuss the ways in which genetic structure may have been shaped by clonal growth and sexual reproduction. 2 A standardized sampling strategy was used to collect 30 ramets from each of 20 populations. Genotypes of the samples were determined by allozyme electrophoresis and analysed assuming that A. nemorosa shows tetraploid-tetrasomic inheritance. 3 Genetic variation and clonal diversity were high compared with other clonal species. Most (95%) of the sampled ramets had unique multilocus genotypes with only 22 examples occurring more than once. Differences between observed and expected heterozygosities within populations were generally small to moderate. Fixation indices (mean of over 14 loci) in the populations ranged between 0.08 and 0.56 (grand mean = 0.21) confirming reports that the breeding system in A. nemorosa is predominantly outcrossing or mixed-mating. 4 Limited historic gene flow among populations (Nm = 0.62) was reflected by high population differentiation (G<latex>ST</latex> = 0.29), low genetic identities among populations and a non-significant correlation between these identities and geographical distances. 5 Spatial autocorrelation (Moran's I) showed no significant differences in genetic structures between populations under similar environmental conditions. Samples taken less than 0.5 m apart were genetically more closely related than to more distant samples, but similarity of genotypes decreased only slightly with further increase in distance. 6 The high levels of genetic variation found in populations of A. nemorosa are probably due to repeated seedling recruitment and the outcrossing or mixed-mating breeding system, whereas vegetative propagation and short-distance seed dispersal may contribute to the positive genetic autocorrelation observed at a small spatial scale.
Nyckelord
Allozymes; Clonal Size; Repeated Seedling Recruitment; Spatial Autocorrelation; Tetrasomic Inheritance
Tidskrift
Journal of Ecology
Förlag
British Ecological Society
ISSN
00220477
År
2000
Volym
88
Nummer
3
Sida
424-435

Title: Variation in breeding system among populations of the common woodland herb Anemone nemorosa (Ranunculaceae)
Author(s): Muller N, Schneller JJ, Holderegger R
Source: PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION 221 (1-2): 69-76 2000
Document Type: Article
Language: English
Cited References: 29      Times Cited: 3      Find Related Records Information
Abstract: Recent studies of germination in natural habitats, of genetic variation within populations and of the relative proportion of vegetative and sexual reproduction in the clonal plant species Anemone nemorosa suggest that sexual recruitment by seeds from outcrossed flowers is important for the maintenance of this species' populations. Because published reports on its breeding system are controversial, pollination experiments were performed in five natural populations of A. nemorosa. Differences in ovule number per flower were recorded among populations, but they were not related to obvious habitat differences. Seed/ovule-ratios were significantly higher after open pollination and artificial crossing than after either artificial or spontaneous selfing. Populations had no effect on seed/ovule-ratios. Different breeding indices indicated that A. nemorosa is mainly self-incompatible. Nevertheless, some seed set also occurred after selfing, and both artificial and spontaneous selfing exhibited higher variation in seed/ovule-ratios than open pollination and artificial crossing. Continuous variation in seed/ovule-ratios after selfing suggested that the expression and effectiveness of the self-incompatibility system of A. nemorosa is influenced by both genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity.
Author Keywords: Anemone nemorosa; breeding system; pollination experiments; self-incompatibility; woodland species
KeyWords Plus: SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY; BIOLOGY; LITTER
Addresses: Muller N (reprint author), Univ Zurich, Inst Systemat Bot, Zollikerstr 107, CH-8008 Zurich, Switzerland
Univ Zurich, Inst Systemat Bot, CH-8008 Zurich, Switzerland
Publisher: SPRINGER-VERLAG WIEN, SACHSENPLATZ 4-6, PO BOX 89, A-1201 VIENNA, AUSTRIA
Subject Category: PLANT SCIENCES; EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
IDS Number: 331MG
ISSN: 0378-2697
Title: Effects of litter removal on the germination of Anemone nemorosa L
Author(s): Holderegger R
Source: FLORA 191 (2): 175-178 APR 1996
Document Type: Article
Language: English
Cited References: 12      Times Cited: 16      Find Related Records Information
Abstract: In a recent article, ERIKSSON (1995) showed high germination rates in Anemone nemorosa. To check whether ERIKSSON'S results are also valid in Central Europe, a litter removal experiment was carried out in Northeastern Switzerland. In both experimental series, litter removal plots and control plots, high germination of A. nemorosa occured. Nevertheless, litter removal greatly enhanced germination of A. nemorosa. A significant correlation between seedling number and ramet density within the plots; pointed to a dominance of very local dispersal. These facts lead to the hypothesis that reproduction by seeds in A. nemorosa as well as vegetative reproduction by clonal growth are of great importance for the maintenance of populations of this species. Surprisingly, no successful germination of A. nemorosa was detected in seed bank investigations.
Author Keywords: Anemone nemorosa; germination; litter removal; local dispersal; seed bank
Addresses: Holderegger R (reprint author), UNIV ZURICH, INST SYSTEMAT BOT, ZOLLIKERSTR 107, CH-8008 ZURICH, SWITZERLAND
Publisher: GUSTAV FISCHER VERLAG JENA, VILLENGANG 2, D-07745 JENA, GERMANY
Subject Category: PLANT SCIENCES
IDS Number: UH547
ISSN: 0367-2530

Title: SEEDLING RECRUITMENT IN DECIDUOUS FOREST HERBS - THE EFFECTS OF LITTER, SOIL CHEMISTRY AND SEED BANK
Author(s): ERIKSSON O
Source: FLORA 190 (1): 65-70 JAN 1995
Document Type: Article
Language: English
Cited References: 28      Times Cited: 54      Find Related Records Information
Abstract: A litter removal experiment, in combination with analyses of soil chemistry and seed bank, were performed to investigate the role of these factors for seedling recruitment of herbs and grasses in a deciduous forest fragment in Sweden. An additional experiment was used to investigate effects of seed availability and seed predation on germination of one selected species, Anemone nemorosa. Removal of litter increased both seedling number and species diversity among seedlings. No species was directly favoured by litter but a few species, most notably A. nemorosa, were capable of germination under litter. No relationships were found between recruitment and soil chemistry. Only 26% of the species in the established vegetation were found in the seed bank. Recruitment in the field, after litter removal, was positively correlated to size and diversity of the seed bank. Seedling recruitment of A. nemorosa was partly limited by seed availability and seed predation. As a generalization, it is suggested that an increase in seed size among deciduous forest herbs implies (1) that litter effects of recruitment decrease, (2) that species become less likely to have a persistent seed bank, (3) that effects of seed predation increase, and (4) that recruitment limitation by seed availability becomes increasingly important.
Author Keywords: GERMINATION; LITTER; PLANT COMMUNITY STRUCTURE; SEED BANK; SEED SIZE; SPECIES DIVERSITY
KeyWords Plus: ANEMONE-NEMOROSA L; GROUND COVER; LEAF LITTER; HERBACEOUS VEGETATION; SPECIES COMPOSITION; LATHYRUS-VERNUS; PLANT COMMUNITY; EMERGENCE; PREDATION; DYNAMICS
Addresses: ERIKSSON O (reprint author), UNIV STOCKHOLM, DEPT BOT, S-10691 STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
Publisher: GUSTAV FISCHER VERLAG JENA, VILLENGANG 2, D-07745 JENA, GERMANY
Subject Category: PLANT SCIENCES
IDS Number: QF048
ISSN: 0367-2530

Enjoy the scientific abstract and I hope it will improve the ways to propagate anemone nemorosa

Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

 


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