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Author Topic: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed  (Read 13558 times)

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2012, 08:09:22 PM »
The next part definitely requires 2 people.
The hinge halves are put together and the pins inserted. The centre point of each light and where it should be placed on the ridge pole are each marked. Each light, depending where it is on the frame will need part of the flap on the F-section removing to clear the diagonal braces and king posts. I used strong snips, and a power file.
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The completed light is offered up to the ridge pole, matching the 2 marks. The roll part of the hinge just hooks over the outer corner edge of the ridge pole. The other half of the hinge is then screwed to the ridge. Keep checking that the lights stay away from their neighbours by about 5-6mm all the way down so that they will not catch on each other. The other lights are attached in the same way.
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« Last Edit: February 16, 2012, 08:29:04 PM by annew »
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Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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ronm

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2012, 08:12:39 PM »
Best I've ever seen Anne. Last a lifetime. Congrats!

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2012, 08:13:29 PM »
To complete the stays, a 300mm length of the narrow aluminium section is cut and both ends rounded off. A 6mm hole is drilled at each end from side to side, at about the centre point of the circle you have made of the ends of the section. This will act as the pivot. One end is attached to the piece of wide aluminium section on the lower side of the frame light, using a 5mm diameter machine screw and locking nut.
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The light is lowered into the closed position. A piece of the wide aluminium section is applied vertically under the light against the side plank, until it just comes short of touching the light. The stay is then laid along it and the position of the bottom hole marked onto the wider piece. The wider piece is then cut to 10mm below the point where the hole in the stay matches up to, and the corners rounded.
7 or 8mm holes are then drilled through the sides of the wide piece at the marked point, at the top, and half way along. 2 smaller countersunk holes are drilled in the channel so that the piece can be screwed to the side plank. To do this, the bottom holes of outer and inner stay are aligned and a nail or pin threaded through, then the wider section is placed against the side plank, and held in position while the nail is removed, when the screws can then be drilled and applied.
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The ridge is capped with a length of PVC pond liner, stapled to the point of the ridge.
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MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

www.dryad-home.co.uk

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2012, 08:17:15 PM »
For the triangular end lights:
Cut a piece of polycarbonate to shape so that it overlaps the end braces, tucking under the lights, with a flat top.
Tape and edge the piece with U-section moulding along the sides and top. For each end, cut 2 pieces of wood the width of the slab top, to fit between the king post and the side planks. Screw into position.
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Using a piece of the F-section moulding with the flap removed, attach 2 hinges to the triangle, drilling and bolting right through the moulding and sheeting together. Edge the remaining part of the triangle base with U-section moulding.
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The triangle is then offered up to the end of the frame and the other half of the hinge screwed into the wooden bearers. A simple catch for the top of the triangle can be made from a small block of wood, and a short piece of the flap removed from the F-section moulding, loosely screwed to the block so it swings freely.
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MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

www.dryad-home.co.uk

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2012, 08:22:59 PM »
I live in a windy place, so I have made extra precautions to prevent the lights being wrenched off by the wind. This is simply a length of webbing long enough to go over the lights when in the open position, with half of a quick release bucle at each end. The other halves of the buckles are screwed to the end slabs, with a short length of webbing. It is quick to fasten and undo. I tend to leave it on every night, just in case the wind gets up I dont want to have to go down the garden in the middle of the night!
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MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2012, 08:27:31 PM »
Finally, it is useful to have a long prop for the lights for when you want to work under them.
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This can be made from a 30mm wide x 800-900mm piece of timber. At the bottom end, on the back, a short piece of the narrow aluminium channel is attached, drilled from side to side as usual. This can be pinned to the top hole in the bottom part of the stay.
At the top end I used 20mm square section aluminium, cut 80mm long. This is screwed to the front of the wood so that when the narrow part of the stay is inserted through it, just enough of the stay pokes out so that a pin can be pushed through the stay to stop it lifting out.
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I attached the pin to the prop with a short length of chain and a staple so that it wouldnt get lost. I made a separate prop for each light. They are narrow enough to store on their sides on top of the slabs inside the frame when not in use.
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Right then, lads and lasses, for homework I want you all to have a go, and please tell me any refinements you come up with, because Ill probably be making some more, since these 2 are already full up.
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

www.dryad-home.co.uk

ronm

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2012, 08:42:53 PM »
Are you sure you can't come and refine them in situ here. I always got E- for homework!

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2012, 09:39:43 PM »
Practice makes perfect, Ron. ;D
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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ArnoldT

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2012, 10:42:31 PM »
Anne:

Are those espaliered fruit trees in the background.
Arnold Trachtenberg
Leonia, New Jersey

Maren

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2012, 10:55:36 PM »
Anne,

that's very good, nice detail and pitfalls explained. Well done.  :) :) :)

« Last Edit: February 16, 2012, 10:59:42 PM by Maren »
Maren in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom - Zone 8

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angie

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2012, 11:43:21 PM »
Thanks Anne for taking the time to download all the pictures and explaining everything, it would have taken me 8 weeks to get these instructions onto my computer so well done.


Angie  :)
Angie T.
....just outside Aberdeen in North East Scotland

ronm

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2012, 08:31:27 AM »
Great topic Anne. You have certainly inspired me to have a go.  ;D ;D
Now where did I put that big hammer  :P

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2012, 08:41:04 AM »
Ron, you have to remember my husband's motto - 'never use a nail when a 6" screw will do'.
Arnold, yes there are espaliered apples and fan-trained plums etc.
Also an awful lot of mess left over from last season, since I spent all my time constructing these babies instead of tidying up.
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

www.dryad-home.co.uk

John85

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2012, 08:45:16 AM »
Anne when I see how much work you have done and how much money you have invested I wonder what are the advantages of a pluge bed made that way instead of a plunge bed in a tunnel?
I found the tunnel easier to build and you are out of the rain all the time while gardening.Even if I am a continental guy I made it the yorkshire way:from the frame under the tarpaulin of a lorry.I got a 2,5m X 8m tunnel for the price of the scrap metal and the sheet of plastic.For good ventilation I can open the front and the back(yes made from pallet wood ;)) and roll up the sides for about 60cm.
it doesn't have the beautiful look of your construction but it may be a cheap and easy alternatve.

annew

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Re: Constructing an outdoor covered plunge bed
« Reply #29 on: February 17, 2012, 09:01:16 AM »
Hi John, I would have to get planning permission for a tunnel, I think. I already have 3 greenhouses in quite a smallish garden, and my mini-nursery is in the part of the garden behind my neighbours' house, so it would be intrusive to them as well.
Respect to you for your Yorkshire approach!
I'll try and tot-up how much the 2 frames cost to make.
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

www.dryad-home.co.uk

 


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