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Author Topic: Rhodohypoxis  (Read 2034 times)

Palustris

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Rhodohypoxis
« on: March 27, 2011, 01:41:22 PM »
Just been cleaning up the pots of Rhodohypoxis, dry stored over winter in the Summer House. They seem to have survived the frost, but hard to tell really as there is no sign of growth. The question is, do I do as I have done in the past and wait for them to appear or should I begin watering now? What do other folks do?

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 05:25:39 PM »
As far as I am concerned - I prefer to have them in flower as late as possible - after the main flush of flowering is over.. so I wait another 2 weeks before watering them for the first time !
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

Lesley Cox

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2011, 10:44:15 PM »
I don't think anywhere in NZ it's important to lift them over the winter, certainly not where I am (to about -6-8 in a cold winter) so they get whatever rain falls from the sky through the year. They start to flower mid spring and will go on almost indefinitely so long as water is applied through the summer. 4-5 months is usual. As soon as watering stops, flowering also stops.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Palustris

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 08:48:46 AM »
You are lucky then Leslie, none of the ones I have tried outside here have ever survived. Tried them over the years in every possible situation and zilch. Even in the Alpine House they struggle and do not thrive. In pots, however, dry stored, frost free(ish) they increase really well. Mind it could be mice which decide their fate in the garden. We lose an awful lot of Crocus to mice and I know that rodents adore Rhodohypoxis too.

Graham Catlow

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2011, 08:53:25 PM »
Palustris
The Rhodohypoxis in the photo has been in the ground for several years including the last two! - and multiplies really well. It is just poking its nose through now.
As you can see it is quite tall compared to the ones that are usually seen, and the leaves are not at full height until after flowering ends. It looks more like long grass. I'm not sure what it is. The label is almost illegible. There is a possibility that the variety says 'biscuit' but it is really unclear.
I bought it from Gardening Scotland about 5 years ago but have no idea from which nursery.

If you would like some just let me know before they really get going. Although I have moved them in the green (I sound like a Galanthophile) with no problems.

(just realised I hadn't added the photo ???)

And another edit - just carefully cleaned the label and although the permanent marker has disappeared it has discoloured the label enough to reveal - Rhodohypoxis milloides 'Claret'.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 07:21:22 AM by Graham Catlow »
Bo'ness. Scotland

Palustris

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2011, 11:03:04 AM »
Thank you very much Graham. I have just been and looked at my labels and I appear to have a decent pot full of that one. I really do think we must lose them to rodents rather than the weather out in the garden. I have just found a tray of 40 small pots of Rh. Dulcie which I potted up last year and every pot appears to have good hard bulbs in them. They were under the staging in the Alpine House and the plunge in there was frozen solid for weeks. Must have words with the cats and get them to do their jobs properly!

Gail

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2021, 07:54:20 AM »
Resurrecting this thread as I had been looking up images of 'Claret'. The plant that I bought as Claret definitely looks more Rosé;
691453-0
« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 04:38:08 PM by Maggi Young »
Gail Harland
Norfolk, England

Graeme

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Re: Rhodohypoxis
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2021, 11:18:01 PM »
Resurrecting this thread as I had been looking up images of 'Claret'. The plant that I bought as Claret definitely looks more Rosé;
Gail that is not 'Claret' which is much darker
That one looks more like one of the Hebron Farm types


"Never believe anything you read on the Internet" Oscar Wilde

 


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