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Author Topic: Another alpine mesemb  (Read 2584 times)

iann

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Another alpine mesemb
« on: November 18, 2009, 04:45:43 PM »
Perhaps more of a steppe mesemb.  Neohenricia sibbettii is certainly very hardy and can be grown outdoors in Denver, CO, but it does its growing in the heat of summer when it can be thirsty.  The flowers are nocturnal and strongly scented.
near Manchester,  NW England, UK

mark smyth

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2009, 04:49:23 PM »
Ian that's a lot of root for a tiny plant
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
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iann

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2009, 04:59:01 PM »
I think it takes a lot of root to grow in South Africa in the summer.  The plant is succulent but so tiny that it can't store much water and rainfall is erratic so I guess it chases the water down into the ground.
near Manchester,  NW England, UK

Maggi Young

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2009, 05:02:52 PM »
Yes, Iann... and doesn't your photo of its root system illustrate that point really well?   8)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Jean-Patrick AGIER

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2009, 08:35:02 PM »
Hi Iann,
Very interesting indeed.Do all the plants living in arid zones develop this kind of roots? I thought Aizoaceae, Cacti and baobab-like plants had quite a poor root system and  also survive by accumulating rain drops and mist  not only through their roots
Lyon / FRANCE

iann

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2009, 09:54:26 PM »
Succulent roots can be large or small.  Aizoaceae range from completely minuscule roots on Conophytums and Argyrodermas to absolutely enormous roots on Fenestrarias and some of the summer growers, and sometimes taproots.  Absorption of water through the skin has not been documented in Aizoaceae and personally I don't think it occurs on any of them.  Stomata in the family are adapted to reduce water loss and are poorly structured for taking up water.  Many cacti have large taproots with quite minor fibrous roots, others have fairly extensive spreading roots.  Some Avonias have tiny fibrous roots attached to a caudex.

Here are:
Fenestraria rhopalophylla
Delosperma dyeri
Delosperma deilanthoides
Mammillaria luethyi
Ariocarpus kotschoubeyanus
Ferocactus herrerae
Ectotropis alpina, Avonia alstonii, and Conophytum frutescens seedlings
near Manchester,  NW England, UK

maggiepie

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2009, 11:36:00 PM »
Fantastic thread, thanks Iann.
It is so interesting to see the different root formations.
Helen Poirier, New Brunswick, Canada-Zone 4b

cohan

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2009, 02:23:42 AM »
Hi Iann,
Very interesting indeed.Do all the plants living in arid zones develop this kind of roots? I thought Aizoaceae, Cacti and baobab-like plants had quite a poor root system and  also survive by accumulating rain drops and mist  not only through their roots

great photos, iann...i had a failed cutting of the neohenricia, once, will have to try it again, though i doubt its hardy here;

very true that xerophytic plants have numerous strategies--even within a genus, you can find plants with very fat roots, only fibrous, more or less succulent tops, no leaves, succulent leaves--they've tried everything!

Jean-Patrick AGIER

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Re: Another alpine mesemb
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2009, 10:28:30 PM »
A very interesting lesson from a specialist.
Thanks a lot Iann
Lyon / FRANCE

 


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