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Author Topic: Anemonellas  (Read 4221 times)

Diane Clement

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Anemonellas
« on: March 30, 2007, 10:11:02 PM »
Following all the interest in Hepaticas, I thought people might be interested in sharing pics of Anemonellas.  The Japanese have been selecting and breeding in a similar way to hepaticas but there's a lot of catching up to do.  Here's a few of mine to start the ball rolling, should be some more later on.
Anemonella thalictroides single white
ditto, double green (thanks to Chris V)
ditto, double pink (very nice Japanese cv)
Diane Clement, Wolverhampton, UK
Director, AGS Seed Exchange

Carlo

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2007, 01:14:58 AM »
I grow 'Betty Blake' 'Oscar Schoaff' and a couple of others. They are bone hardy here...and were also impossible to lose in Wisconsin where they went through several winters in pots totally neglected.

They are now considered Thalictrum thalictroides--although like many who grow them, I still like the name Anemonella.

Carlo
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Susan Band

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2007, 07:20:59 PM »
One of the main problems with identifying anemonellas that the flower changes so much when ageing . I know I have bought what I thought are different ones only to get them home and find out that after a few days they turn into something I already have, or something I have develops into the 'new one' The worst offender are the green doubles, they can change they looks 3 or 4 times from start to finish.
Susan Band, Pitcairn Alpines, ,PERTH. Scotland


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henkw

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007, 08:31:54 PM »
Dear Diane,

I have also Thalictrum thalictroides Alba under this name but the leaves are a total different colour more brownish.

Is this a different specie?
in the Netherlands

Susan Band

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2007, 07:41:13 AM »
Henk,
Same species, different form. Better in my humble opinion.
Sowing seed from these can give slightly different plants, if you choose a good pink one you gan select them darker and darker.
Susan Band, Pitcairn Alpines, ,PERTH. Scotland


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Afloden

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2007, 11:02:25 PM »

 The leave color shows this variation almost throughout the native range. I have not noticed any correlation with soil, flower color, or weather, but it is always consistent on the plants I grow.
 The forma rubra/rosea from the mountains out east fades white in my spring heat, but those from warm spring areas keep the pink flower color better for me.

 Here are a few nice ones; 1) Betty Blake, the full green double as it is known here, it was bought as Green Hurricane.
 2) Cameo, a light pink double
 3) Heather, one I found in Alabama. This is its first blooming since transplanting and then being dug up by a squirrel. When I found it the flower had 2-3 rows of equal sized tepals of a pale pink that were held tightly together.
 4) A good large sepaled pink.
Missouri, at the northeast edge of the Ozark Plateau

illingworth

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2007, 03:12:34 PM »
I have posted versions of these pictures in the old forum when Anemonellas came up as a topic.
I'm not certain of the name for the "Snowball",  as the label is, appropriatley, still under snow. It was obtained in a trade from a Brit. Here, the most vigorous grower is Betty Blake which seems to have thrown a few seedlings in addition to numerous tubers. I'm waiting for these seedlings to bloom to see the results.
Rob and Sharon,
Our garden at http://www.flickr.com/photos/illingworth/
Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

Carlo

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2007, 03:29:11 PM »
Rob,

I'll have to give a closer look to my 'Jade Feather' when it blooms this year (as it will soon). It seems to me it's much different than yours--both lovely to be sure--but different.

Carlo
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Paul T

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Re: Anemonellas
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2007, 07:38:07 AM »
Beautiful.  I have the "basic" version here and it is the only one I have ever seen.  I'm guessing there are others around in collections.  Maybe I will get into these once I have all the Hepaticas!! <grin>
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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