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Author Topic: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties  (Read 8865 times)

annew

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2006, 11:29:56 PM »
Hoy! You lot! I don't hear anybody talking about eating crocuses or frits - hands off the ferns! ;)
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Dryad Nursery, Yorkshire, England

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KentGardener

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #16 on: December 02, 2006, 06:12:27 AM »
mmmmmmm...... fiddleheads.......

John

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Paul T

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #17 on: December 02, 2006, 10:59:12 PM »
John,

Those pics of the various varieties of the fern are awesome.  I don't think I've actually come across this species before, or at least not that I am aware of anyway.  I rather like crested types of ferns, and a couple of the ones you posted definitely fit that category.  I must keep an eye out in the future for them.  What is their hardiness?
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

KentGardener

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2006, 06:13:17 AM »
Hi Paul

they are all varieties of one type of fern called Aspleniun scolopendrium (Basic plant shown below).  These crop up all over England (on walls, in woodlands, just about anywhere (I am thinking of doing a study of weird places I have seen them grow for one of the fern magazines).  Fortunately for me, and the few others who are really into these ferns, they sometimes have the strangest variations in form.  The Victorian fern crase did lots to find these, either when natuarly occuring or raising them from spore.  One of my friends is currently applying for National Collection status for his excellent collection of Scollies - part of the reason I put my request on this forum for any odd / old / unusual variteties to be added to the collection.

Spore raised plants do not always turn out like the parents but there is usually a good chance that you will get something unusual.  Have you grown ferns from spore before?  If you would like to try, and are allowed to receive spore in Australia, I could send you some next year.  For great instructions on how to have success with fern spores contact AnneW who has written a wonderful fact sheet for the fern society - she has offered to send copies to the guys on here too.

If you do want me to send some over next year give me a little reminder in about April and I shall start checking the leaves on some of the better forms.  Is it the crested ones (normalish leaf with cresting at the tips) or the crisped ones (with wavy edges to the leaves) that you like?  Or would you just want a selection of spore to see what pops up?

cheers

John

(Normal Asplenium scolopendrium)
« Last Edit: December 03, 2006, 07:13:33 AM by KentGardener »
John

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Paul T

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2006, 11:16:50 AM »
John,

Are these the 'Hart's Tongue' ferns (I think that is the spelling)?  I was watering this evening and realised that what I have as that (I couldn't find the tag in the dusk so I couldnt' verify the scientific name) matches one of the rippled ones you have.  I must admit I rather like all of them, but the crested forms are the ferns I am particularly partial to.  If they are all over England then they must be pretty cold hardy too!!  I'll check up on or quarantine and see whether they are OK to bring in, but I'd would imagine that the genus should be OK for spores.  That reminds me as well..... I owe Anne some spore of a couple of ferns I have here (I recall one of them was my variegated Maidenhair fern, and I still have the email so I will check for the other one too Anne!).  I had forgotten until just now, so I must rectify that. 

Anne, I would be interested in seeing your fern spore growing instructions that John mentioned, as it has been quite some time since I last sowed fern spore.  I used to grow them around the 8 to 12yo mark, when I had a collection of over 50 different types of ferns (not bad for where I grew up, particularly with how dodgy our weather was out on the farm!  ;D).  I think I recall how I used to do it, but some expert instructions definitely wouldn't hurt!  I have some spores of the NZ Silver Fern to sow at the moment too, so the instructions would be rather timely!!  :D

Once again, thanks John for the spore offer.  Hopefully I can take you up on it as they look like wonderful forms and particularly as they are likely to be hardy!! Yeah!!  8)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Paul T

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2006, 09:39:39 AM »
John,

I remembered to find the tag for my plant today and we are talking about the same thing.  Mine is obviously not quite the straight species, as mine has ruffles along the edge, but it is different again to the pictures that you put on the first page of this thread.  I'm glad that I know exactly what fern you are talking about now, and I definitely am interested in the different forms of it.  I just love the one I have, but never realised there were different ones to find!  ;D  I can feel another collection coming on!! LOL
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

KentGardener

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2006, 10:35:50 AM »
Hi Paul

it is good to hear that scollies can be grown succesfully where you are.  If you give me a gentle reminder next year I shall send a selection of spore.

regards

John
John

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Paul T

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Re: Asplenium Scolopendrium varieties
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2006, 10:51:23 AM »
John,

Now I just need someone to give me a gentle reminder to give you a gentle reminder!!  ;D

Thanks in anticipation.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

 


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