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Author Topic: A strange cactus  (Read 2781 times)

ruweiss

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A strange cactus
« on: October 01, 2008, 04:11:43 PM »
In the last warm days in September my plant of Digitostigma (Astrophytum) caput-medusae surprised
me with this nicely scented flower. This Mexican plant is rather new in cultivation and was described
in 2002. It is amazing, that it could stay undiscovered for such a long time. Due to lack of space I can
cultivate only very few cactii, but at our local plant sale in march I could not resist to buy this small grafted plant.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Carlo

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Re: A strange cactus
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2008, 04:25:19 PM »
such a pity it's grafted...

Beautiful flower though. I grow several Astrophytums on their own roots...I think it's a much nicer look--despite the fact that they may grow slowly and be more difficult...

Well grown; congratulations.
Carlo A. Balistrieri
Vice President
The Garden Conservancy
Zone 6

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ruweiss

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Re: A strange cactus
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2008, 07:48:44 PM »
Dear Carlo, thank you for your kind comment, My main interest are alpine plants,so
I have only very few cactii in a corner of my alpine house,because the space for winter
on my windowsills is very limited. As a schoolboy I once saw a picture of Astrophytum
asterias in an old Haage catalogue and was fascinated about this showy and interesting
genus and this interest is still alive.That was the reason for me to buy this grafted plant for
easier cultivation.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

mark smyth

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Re: A strange cactus
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2008, 11:41:35 AM »
I only just saw this. That's a very interesting Cactus. How long has it taken to flower?
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

KentGardener

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Re: A strange cactus
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2008, 05:21:54 AM »
Very interesting Rudi.  I had not heard of that cactus before.  I have been out of touch with the BCSS since I sold my entire collection, and didn't renew my membership, in the early 1990's.  The last cactus I remember being discovered was the Aztekium discovered in the 80's.  It is indeed amazing how there are still brand new plants and bugs continuing to be discovered in this century.

Thank you for showing the picture of this interesting new plant.

John
John

John passed away in 2017 - his posts remain here in tribute to his friendship and contribution to the forum.

ruweiss

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Re: A strange cactus
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2008, 08:36:53 PM »
Mark, I bought this plant at the plant sale of our cactus club in march 2008. There were 2 grafts on a fat stock plant, each one
about 2 cm long. One of them refused to grow, but the other one grew amazingly quick and flowered at the end of september.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

 


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