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Author Topic: Chimaphila maculata  (Read 651 times)

Nik

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Chimaphila maculata
« on: November 04, 2021, 02:38:14 PM »
Another wildflower that grows freely in our yard. Some are slightly pink.

Chimaphila maculata

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« Last Edit: November 04, 2021, 05:33:35 PM by Nik »
Connecticut, zone 7a

Vinny 123

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2021, 03:16:59 PM »
Extremely attractive plant. Thanks again for sharing.

Maggi Young

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2021, 05:04:08 PM »
Super little plant, Nik - and one I haven't succeed in growing from seed.  :'(
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2021, 05:33:09 PM »
Hi Maggi, thanks for fixing the pictures.
I am sure you probably know all of this, but this is from pfaf.org:

"This species is difficult to propagate and grow in cultivation, mainly because it has certain mycorrhizal associations in the wild and these are necessary if the plant is to thrive. It is best to use some soil collected from around an established plant when sowing seed or planting out into a new position. "
"Seed - very difficult to germinate ... It is best sown on moist sphagnum peat. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a shady position in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. "

I have never tried to propagate it myself. It self-seeds and spreads on its own. Our yard has very acidic soil and in general we have very high air humidity year round. It is in shady, dry soil spots under trees. I hope this helps in your efforts.
I will try to take some pictures of the seed capsules and seeds later today (they are all mature by now, I am sure; the flower pictures are from the summer). And the nice foliage. Will post later.
Connecticut, zone 7a

Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2021, 08:31:25 PM »
I didn’t realize the seeds are so tiny!
Connecticut, zone 7a

Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2021, 08:33:41 PM »
Leaf shape and markings are quite variable between plants. I suspect it’s genetic, not habitat influence.
Connecticut, zone 7a

Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2021, 08:34:43 PM »
Few more
Connecticut, zone 7a

Maggi Young

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2021, 10:40:35 PM »
We tried sowing the seeds in mossy areas beside where  we have other Wintergreens growing, in the hope they would share  a similar mycorrhizal association - but no luck.

I didn't realise  the  Chimaphila  could have such great  leaf variations - makes  me  like them even more! They're almost as varied as Cyclamen.   Gorgeous- thank you so much for sharing these  photos, Nik!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2021, 09:07:13 AM »
We tried sowing the seeds in mossy areas beside where  we have other Wintergreens growing, in the hope they would share  a similar mycorrhizal association - but no luck.


Maggi, don’t give up. According to University of Washington, they may need few years of stratification:

“ Sow as soon as ripe on moist peat with small amount of inoculated soil from parent site.  It is very possible however that seeds that have germinated in trials are actually seeds already within the soil seed bank rather than those collected and sown.  This suggests that extensive stratification may be required.  Efforts to germinate Chimaphila have met almost entirely with failure, therefore it may be easier to propagate from cuttings and rhizomes “

They say “almost entirely” , not “entirely”.
Best,
Nik

Connecticut, zone 7a

MarcR

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2022, 03:23:01 AM »
Super little plant, Nik - and one I haven't succeed in growing from seed.  :'(

Maggi,

If you have access to E.B.Stone potting mix; it is fortified with several helpful microrhizae and bacteria. If you don't have access to it, I am willing to send you a baggie full.  The Chimaphila needs 3-7 alternating 90 day cycles of 4c and 20c.

The E.B. Stone, as it comes out of the bag is not acid enough so add some pine or fir finds.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2022, 04:35:09 AM by MarcR »
Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F  -9.4C.  Rainfall 50"+  but none  June-+September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight.  soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus.  Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix.

Maggi Young

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2022, 09:37:44 PM »
Maggi,

If you have access to E.B.Stone potting mix; it is fortified with several helpful microrhizae and bacteria. If you don't have access to it, I am willing to send you a baggie full.  The Chimaphila needs 3-7 alternating 90 day cycles of 4c and 20c.

The E.B. Stone, as it comes out of the bag is not acid enough so add some pine or fir finds.
Very kind of you, Marc, but I no longer have any seed.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2022, 10:37:28 PM »
Very kind of you, Marc, but I no longer have any seed.
Maggi,
If you are interested, I can collect and send you seeds later this year (November-ish). Just let me know.

Connecticut, zone 7a

Maggi Young

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2022, 06:00:01 PM »
Maggi,
If you are interested, I can collect and send you seeds later this year (November-ish). Just let me know.


How kind - I'll try to remember!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2022, 01:21:43 PM »
The cold during winter intensifies the red color of the stem and the leaf base.
Connecticut, zone 7a

Nik

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Re: Chimaphila maculata
« Reply #14 on: April 09, 2022, 02:34:35 PM »
One more example (closeup).
Connecticut, zone 7a

 


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