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Author Topic: Pulsatilla 2021  (Read 3940 times)

Susann

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2021, 06:00:26 PM »
The Pulsatillas in my garden do not really follow their natural order of flowering time. So while species in the albana group is just about to flower two species from the Alps are in full glory despite there are hardly any pollinators.

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Pulsatilla alpina. I do not know which subspecies

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Pulsatilla alpina ssp apiifolia

Talking about nomenclature mysteries; here is one. The species Pulsatilla alpine is divided into endless subspecies. Pulsatilla alpina ssp apiifolia is one of them. A few of the subspecies are very questionable. Do they really deserve to exist? With this one I believe it is the other way around. Should it not be a separate species? It has a very distinct morphology regarding both basal- and involucre leaves, flower color as well as seedhead. It is also invasive which I would not describe as being typical for the rest of the  Pulsatilla alpina group.

« Last Edit: May 25, 2021, 10:58:19 PM by Maggi Young »
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brianw

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2021, 12:15:46 PM »
These are now so readily available in colour strains in garden centres they have been demystified somewhat. P. vulgaris is looked upon as a rare meadow plant here in SE UK. Is it because of digging for the garden or discouraged because it is apparently poisonous to cattle? My pheasants eat if if i don't cage the plants, and even peck at the flowers through the netting, although they seem to lose interest in the seed heads. Before caging they pecked away the growing centre and some plants died. I assume like "buttercups" they lose the poisonous quality when dried in hay.
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England

Susann

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2021, 05:34:24 PM »
Brian, interesting to learn about your pheasants eating the Pulsatillas. I remember observing a "white bird" enyoing a Pulsatilla meal. I was secretly happy it would give him a bad experience teaching him to leave these beauties alone in the future. But, if it would affect birds you would have noticed it. So, bird are now added the list of Pulsatilla predators. At least pheasants and "Russian white birds".

However, cattle do not touch them nor do horses or sheep. But, they can still, unknowingly, contribute to the extinction of them if the farmers use fertilizers for the pastures. I was told this was the cause if extinction in a place I visited in Hungary.

And a thank you to our Forum Fairy that helps me with the pictures! How many years have you been dedicating to us, Maggi? And do you ever sleep?



 
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Carolyn

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2021, 06:41:45 PM »
Susann,
Why would the fertilisers kill the pulsatillas? Is it because they are  a high strength dose? I remember reading - I donít know where - that you should not feed your pulsatillas. I do feed my young plants in pots with dilute fertiliser and they have come to no harm. I donít bother to feed the ones in the garden though, I think the soil has sufficient nutrients for them. I would be interested to know your views on pulsatillas and fertiliser.
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Tristan_He

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2021, 10:14:25 PM »
Carolyn, the usual reason fertilizers are bad news in grassland is that it promotes very lush grass growth, which then results in Pulsatillas (and other interesting flowers) being outcompeted. But there can be direct toxic effects too especially from ammonia.

In the garden that isn't a problem by and large, though probably it's possible to damage some plants by overfeeding.

Best wishes, Tristan

Carolyn

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2021, 09:45:38 AM »
Yes, that makes sense. I notice the same effect in my orchard area, where I fertilise around the apple trees - no yellow rattle etc grows in those patches.
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Guff

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #36 on: November 18, 2021, 07:23:58 PM »
How long from seed to flower?

Thinking about growing some. Do Honey Bees like them?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2021, 08:55:25 PM by Guff »

Tristan_He

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #37 on: November 22, 2021, 07:41:54 PM »
Hi Guff, probably 3 years, possibly 2 if you are really efficient (I'm not). 5 years to get a decent sized clump.

Well worth growing from seed, they are easy provided seed is fresh.

Guff

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #38 on: November 22, 2021, 11:06:21 PM »
Tristan, thanks.

Ordered Pulsatilla alpina ssp. apiifolia and Pulsatilla patens. Bought two packets of each, will be starting 20-25 seeds of each type, the rest of the seeds will be planted outside in a bed come Spring

Curious, do I need to add limestone(pellet or powder) to my leaf compost mix for seedlings? I'm going to grow them under lights through the winter if I can get some to germinate.

Thinking, I will start them in a plastic shoe box and place the seeds on top of my compost mix. When they start to germinate, into single cups they go.

Thanks for info.

Tristan_He

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #39 on: November 24, 2021, 08:25:51 AM »
Re: lime, it depends on the species and your mix. To be honest I never bother with it unless it is a species that really needs lime. P. alpina subsp. apiifolia dislikes lime anyway so definitely no in this case.

I use my standard alpines mix which is generally about half and half a loam based compost such as JI No. 2 and perlite, sown in a fairly large pot. Pulsatilla seedlings have quite deep roots and do not like being repotted, so you need to give them space. Once they germinate, I have found this year that growth seems to be very good if you put the pot in a sand plunge bed outdoors where temperatures are stabilised and the roots can go down. Weak liquid feeding (as for bulbs) is also beneficial.

If you have access to the seed exchanges this is well worth trying as germination will be quicker.

Good luck!
Tristan

Guff

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #40 on: November 27, 2021, 01:56:14 AM »
Tristan, thanks for the help.

I may buy a couple plants in the Spring if they come back in stock , found this web site that has a collection. No clue how much they cost, will check again towards Spring.

https://www.highcountrygardens.com/pasque-flower-pulsatilla-collection


Seeds came today. Might start some tomorrow, or Sunday.





« Last Edit: November 27, 2021, 02:07:36 AM by Guff »

Tristan_He

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #41 on: November 28, 2021, 10:06:40 AM »
Those are alplains packets aren't they Guff? Did you order them recently?

I contacted him a while back as I wanted to order, but never received a response, so wondered if he had stopped trading. His website (or at least the front page) has not been updated recently and I imagine seed collecting would have been difficult with Covid and all the wildfires.

Hoy

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #42 on: November 28, 2021, 10:25:27 AM »
Alan, Alplains, was out seedhunting in November. He is still in business.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Guff

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #43 on: November 28, 2021, 03:45:43 PM »
Yes from Alplains. When I asked Alan about ordering, he said he had plenty of both that I had ordered.

He also has Anemone occidentalis listed. Would have gotten a packet of those also, but didn't see them until after I sent out payment. I was googling and it says it's also a Pulsatilla.

Guff

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Re: Pulsatilla 2021
« Reply #44 on: December 02, 2021, 03:34:48 AM »
Seeds soaking

Pulsatilla alpina ssp. apiifolia must be a bigger flower then Pulsatilla patens? Big difference in the size of seeds.

Should the long barb part at the end of seed be cut back, or is it not a problem with rot/fungus? Not sure what it's called, to be honest.

Thanks for info
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